History Podcasts

Dred Scott Case - Decision, Definition and Impact

Dred Scott Case - Decision, Definition and Impact



We are searching data for your request:

Forums and discussions:
Manuals and reference books:
Data from registers:
Wait the end of the search in all databases.
Upon completion, a link will appear to access the found materials.

The Dred Scott case, also known as Dred Scott v. Sandford, was a decade-long fight for freedom by a Black enslaved man named Dred Scott. The case persisted through several courts and ultimately reached the U.S. Supreme Court, whose decision incensed abolitionists, gave momentum to the anti-slavery movement and served as a stepping stone to the Civil War.

Who Was Dred Scott?

Dred Scott was born into slavery around 1799 in Southampton County, Virginia. In 1818, he moved with his owner Peter Blow to Alabama, then in 1830 he moved to St. Louis, Missouri—both slave states—where Peter ran a boarding house.

After Blow died in 1832, army surgeon Dr. John Emerson purchased Scott and eventually took him to Illinois, a free state, and then to Fort Snelling in Wisconsin Territory where the Missouri Compromise had outlawed slavery. There, Scott married Harriet Robinson, also enslaved, in a rare civil ceremony; her owner transferred ownership of Harriet to Emerson.

In late 1837, Emerson returned to St. Louis but left Dred and Harriet Scott behind and hired them out. Emerson then moved to Louisiana, a slave state, where he met and married Eliza (Irene) Sandford in February 1838; Dred Scott soon joined them.

In October 1838, Emerson, his wife Irene and their enslaved workers returned to Wisconsin. After the army honorably discharged Emerson in 1842, he and Irene returned to St. Louis with Scott and his family (which now included two daughters), but they struggled to find success and soon moved to Iowa. It’s unclear if Scott and his family accompanied them or stayed in St. Louis to be hired out.

John Emerson died suddenly in 1843 in Iowa, and his enslaved workers became Irene’s property. She returned to St. Louis to live with her father and hired out Scott and his family. Scott tried multiple times to purchase his freedom from Irene, but she refused.

For unknown reasons, Dred and Harriet Scott never tried to run away or sue for freedom while living in or traveling through free states and territories.

Dred Scott v. Sandford

In April 1846, Dred and Harriet filed separate lawsuits for freedom in the St. Louis Circuit Court against Irene Emerson based on two Missouri statutes. One statute allowed any person of any color to sue for wrongful enslavement. The other stated that any person taken to a free territory automatically became free and could not be re-enslaved upon returning to a slave state.

Neither Dred nor Harriet Scott could read or write and they needed both logistical and financial support to plead their case. They received it from their church, abolitionists and an unlikely source, the Blow family who had once owned them.

Since Dred and Harriet Scott had lived in Illinois and the Wisconsin Territory — both free domains — they hoped they had a persuasive case. When they went to trial on June 30, 1847, however, the court ruled against them on a technicality and the judge granted a retrial.

The Scotts went to trial again in January 1850 and won their freedom. Irene appealed the case to the Missouri Supreme Court which combined Dred and Harriet’s cases and reversed the lower court’s decision in 1852, making Dred Scott and his family enslaved again.

In November 1853, Scott filed a federal lawsuit with the United States Circuit Court for the District of Missouri. By this time, Irene had transferred Scott and his family to her brother, John Sandford (although it was determined later that she retained ownership). On May 15, 1854, the federal court heard Dred Scott v. Sandford and ruled against Scott, holding him and his family in slavery.

In December 1854, Scott appealed his case to the United States Supreme Court. The trial began on February 11, 1856. By this time, the case had gained notoriety and Scott received support from many abolitionists, including powerful politicians and high-profile attorneys. But on March 6, 1857, in the infamous Dred Scott decision, Scott lost his fight for freedom again.

Chief Justice Roger Taney

Roger Taney was born into the southern aristocracy and became the fifth Chief Justice of the United States Supreme Court.

Taney became best known for writing the final majority opinion in Dred Scott v. Sandford, which said that all people of African descent, free or enslaved, were not United States citizens and therefore had no right to sue in federal court. In addition, he wrote that the Fifth Amendment protected slave owner rights because enslaved workers were their legal property.

The decision also argued that the Missouri Compromise legislation — passed to balance the power between slave and non-slave states — was unconstitutional. In effect, this meant that Congress had no power to prevent the spread of slavery.

Despite Taney’s long tenure as a Supreme Court justice, people vilified him for his role in the Dred Scott v. Sandford decision. In an ironic historical footnote, Taney would later swear in Abraham Lincoln, the "Great Emancipator," as president of the United States in 1861.

Dred Scott Wins His Freedom

By the time the U.S. Supreme Court handed down its Dred Scott decision, Irene had married her second husband, Calvin Chaffee, a U.S. congressman and abolitionist. Upset upon learning his wife still owned the most infamous slave of the time, he sold Scott and his family to Taylor Blow, the son of Peter Blow, Scott’s original owner.

Taylor freed Scott and his family on May 26, 1857. Scott found work as a porter in a St. Louis hotel, but didn’t live long as a free man. At about 59 years of age, Scott died from tuberculosis on September 17, 1858.

Dred Scott Decision: Impact On Civil War

The Dred Scott Decision outraged abolitionists, who saw the Supreme Court’s ruling as a way to stop debate about slavery in the territories. The divide between North and South over slavery grew and culminated in the secession of southern states from the Union and the creation of the Confederate States of America. The Emancipation Proclamation of September 22, 1862 freed enslaved people living in the Confederacy, but it would be another three years until Congress passed the 13th Amendment abolishing slavery in the United States.

Sources

Missouri State Archives: Missouri’s Dred Scott Case, 1846-1857. Missouri Digital Heritage.
Primary Documents in American History: Dred Scott v. Sandford. The Library of Congress.
Roger B. Taney. United States Senate.
The Dred Scott Case. National Park Service.


Dred Scott impact

Dred Scott Decision: Impact On Civil War The Dred Scott Decision outraged abolitionists, who saw the Supreme Court's ruling as a way to stop debate about slavery in the territories The Dred Scott decision served as an eye-opener to Northerners who believed that slavery was tolerable as long as it stayed in the South. If the decision took away any power Congress once had to regulate slavery in new territories, these once-skeptics reasoned, slavery could quickly expand int

Dred Scott Case - Decision, Definition & Impact - HISTOR

  1. The Dred Scott decision thus increased tensions and pushed the country closer toward the outbreak of the American Civil War (1861-65)
  2. The Dred Scott had a major impact on the blacks during the period of the middle 1800s. The decision had affected Scott by showcasing he is still a slave, so therefore no correct way to file a lawsuit in the United States (ecision, 1800). Scott acknowledged that the Missouri Compromise, was a success for the individuals who live in the South
  3. Impact of Dred Scott The Dred Scott decision was an eye opener to Northerners who believed that slavery was tolerable as long as it stayed in the South. It was feared that if Congress lost power to regulate slavery in new territories, it could expand quickly into the western U.S and then into once-free states
  4. The Dred Scott Decision A Nation Torn Apart In 1857, the United States Supreme Court heard the case of an enslaved man named Dred Scott, who filed suit to free himself and his family. Slavery in the United States was a hotbed issue at the time, an issue that was about to boil over into the bloodiest conflict in American history
  5. g of the Civil War and Abraham Lincoln's presidency four years later. The case of Dred Scott v. Sandford was one of the most controversial decisions in the court's history
  6. Dred Scott was a slave who was owned by John Emerson of Missouri. In 1833 Emerson undertook a series of moves as part of his service in the U.S. military. He took Scott from Missouri (a slave state) to Illinois (a free state) and finally into the Wisconsin Territory (a free territory)
  7. The Dred Scott decision sparked outrage in the northern states and glee in the South — the growing schism made Civil War inevitable. Too controversial to retain the Scotts as slaves after the..

Dred Scott: Impact of Dred Scott - watson

The Dred Scott Case (1857) From the climate in America in 1857 and the background Dred Scott's suit for freedom to the impact of the Supreme Court's decision, this website by a Brown University student presents a comprehensive look at this important event The Dred Scott case also led to the war. The decision drove the Republicans to elect Abraham Lincoln three years later, and his goal was to preserve the Union. However, the tension was so high at that point that South Carolina seceded the same year. The Civil War started a year later. This shows that the tensions caused by the Dred Scott case. Dred Scott was an enslaved African American man within the United States who unsuccessfully sued for his freedom and of his spouse and their two girls within the Dred Scott v. Sandford case of 1857, famously known as the Dred Scott case. The Dred Scott decision was the culmination of the case of Dred Scott v Impact of Dred Scott in the United States The Beginnings Of Scott V. Sandford Slavery is founded on the selfishness of man's nature-opposition to it on his love of justice. These principles are in eternal antagonism and when brought into collision so fiercely as slavery extension brings [] Law is our Passio The Dred Scott case destroyed the delicate agreement between slave and free states and created national anger that helped lead to the Civil War

Dred Scott Decision Causes & Effects Britannic

Dred Scott (c. 1799 - September 17, 1858) was an enslaved African-American man in the United States who unsuccessfully sued for his freedom and that of his wife, Harriet Robinson Scott, and their two daughters in the Dred Scott v. Sandford case of 1857, popularly known as the Dred Scott decision The infamous Dred Scott v. Sandford case was decided on March 6th, 1857 and ruled in a 7-2 for Sandford. This case sparked a flame that would turn a disagreement between parts of the United States into a Civil War just three years after the case was decided Sandford, where the U.S. Supreme Court rejected Scott's claim to freedom by a vote of 7-2. While the verdict had a personal impact on Scott and his family, it also had legal, political, social, and economic ramifications that reverberated throughout the country in the years immediately preceding the Civil War The impact of Dred Scott and the questions it raised—who is an American and is citizenship a requirement for basic constitutional rights—remain with us today. Samuel Nelson, 1864 Carl B. Brandt, oil on canvas Fenimore Art Museum, Cooperstown, New York Gift of W.B. Simmonds, N0086.1957 Photograph by Richard Walker Dred Scott v. Sandford, 60 U.S. (19 How.) 393 (1857), was a landmark decision of the US Supreme Court in which the Court held that the US Constitution was not meant to include American citizenship for black people, regardless of whether they were enslaved or free, and so the rights and privileges that the Constitution confers upon American citizens could not apply to them

The Impact of the Dred Scott Case on the United States

  1. ing that no Negro, the term then used to describe anyone with African blood, was or could ever be a.
  2. Dredd Scott The first major eruption in Mr. Lincoln's and the nation's attitude toward slavery was the passage of the Kansas-Nebraska Act in 1854. The second major upheaval was the Supreme Court's decision on the Dred Scott case
  3. Dred Scott v Sanford was one of the most controversial cases in history, with a Georgian sitting on the Supreme Court that decided it. Dred Scott was a Missouri slave who sued for freedom after his master took him to the free territories of Illinois and Wisconsin
  4. Scott was born into slavery around 1795 in Southampton Country, Virginia. Originally named Sam, he chose the name Dred after an older brother who had died. In 1830 Scott was sold to a doctor with the United States Army named John Emerson
  5. Thereof, what was the impact of Dred Scott v Sandford? The Dred Scott decision of March 6, 1857, brought to a head the tension surrounding the issue of slavery in the United States.In the case, the Supreme Court ruled that Scott was still a slave, and therefore, and no right to file suit in a United States court as he was not a citizen and did not have the rights of such
  6. In 1857, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled in the Dred Scott decision that African-Americans were not citizens of the United States. Yet within 18 years, Black Americans would not only have citizenship, but would be guaranteed the right to vote and equal access to transportation, housing, and other facilities by the Civil Rights Act of 1875.Although many of these rights would be lost through the.

Impact of Dred Scott - Exploro

  1. This entry about Impact of Dred Scott has been published under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0) licence, which permits unrestricted use and reproduction, provided the author or authors of the Impact of Dred Scott entry and the Encyclopedia of Law are in each case credited as the source of the Impact of Dred Scott entry
  2. The Dred Scott Case had a huge impact on the United States as it is today. The Thirteenth and Fourteenth Amendments have called it the worst Supreme Court decision ever rendered and was later overturned. The Dred Scott Decision was a key case regarding the issue of slavery the case started as a slave seeking his rightful freedom and mushroomed.
  3. ent national conflict
  4. Dred Scott, a case that intensified national divisions over the issue of slavery. In 1834, Dred Scott, a slave, had been taken to Illinois , a free state, and then Wisconsin territory, where the.
  5. Scott was born into slavery around 1795 in Southampton Country, Virginia. Originally named Sam, he chose the name Dred after an older brother who had died. In 1830 Scott was sold to a doctor with the United States Army named John Emerson

February is Black History Month, and with that, Scruggs Law wants to help shine the light on a Missouri case that changed the country: Dred Scott v. Sanford. The Dred Scott Decision changed the Civil War by increasing tensions. Mainly this decision increased tension between the North and the South, but it did increase other tensions. First of all, for the North and the South, in the courtroom the majority of the justices were from the South, and just like Taney (the main justice recognized) accepted.

Which of the following describes the impact the Dred Scott v. Sanford case had on slavery and enslaved persons? A. It declared slavery to be unconstitutional B. It denied Congress the power to abolish slavery in the territories C. Though still legal, it gave enslaved people more rights D. It left the decisions of slaves' rights up to individual states How did the proposals in the Crittenden. In 1847 an enslaved African American, Dred Scott, went to trial to sue for his freedom. This case, which later became known as Dred Scott v. Sanford, impacted the citizenship of all African Americans throughout the United States. Dred Scott was born a slave in Southampton County, Virginia and was owned by Peter Blow Dred Scott v Sanford was one of the most controversial cases in history, with a Georgian sitting on the Supreme Court that decided it. Dred Scott was a Missouri slave who sued for freedom after his master took him to the free territories of Illinois and Wisconsin. The Supreme Court, led by Chief Justice Roger Taney and James Moore Wayne of Georgia, ruled that blacks had no rights which any. Dred Scott was born an . enslaved person. in Virginia around 1799. In 1834, a man named Dr. Emerson bought Dred Scott and they moved to Illinois, a non-slave (free) state. Later they moved to Minnesota, also a non-slave state. Then the Emersons and the Scotts moved to Missouri, a slave state. In 1843, Dr. Emerson died and his wife became Dred.

Dred Scott v. Sandford: History, Decision, and Impact ..

The Dred Scott decision struck a blow to those who believed Congress could legislate the bounds of slavery. The Supreme Court's ruling effectively said slavery could move into new territories and. [See the video here.]. While I won't here sketch out the history and impact of the Dred Scott case as that is a book length chore, the March 6, 1857 decision by Chief Justice Taney held that the federal Constitution created a perpetual and impassible barrier between whites and blacks. This barrier defined blacks as a subordinate and inferior class of being, with no natural rights Scott vs. Sanford. The case was brought to Federal Court in 1854. The previous decision was upheld. Dred Scott appealed to the U.S. Supreme Court suing on the basis that Sanford was a resident of New York and not of Missouri. The judge decided that they had jurisdiction to try the case. The Supreme Court decided 7-2 against Scott DRED SCOTT. In 1857, several months after President Buchanan took the oath of office, the Supreme Court ruled in Dred Scott v. Sandford.Dred Scott (), born a slave in Virginia in 1795, had been one of the thousands forced to relocate as a result of the massive internal slave trade and taken to Missouri, where slavery had been adopted as part of the Missouri Compromise The Dred Scott case (1857) vaulted the Supreme Court into the midst of the swirling controversy over slavery that erupted into the Civil War in a few brief years. There can be little doubt the case contributed to raising the level of conflict and thus contributed to the coming of the war

. His case made it to the Supreme Court prior to the American Civil War. Roger B. Taney. Roger Brooke Taney was the fifth Chief Justice of the Supreme Court, holding that office from 1836 until his death in 1864 Dred Scott v. Sandford. The Dred Scott decision was a 1857 United States Supreme Court decision involving a slave, Dred Scott, who sued his master, John Sanford ( spelled incorrectly on court.

Dred Scott decision still resonates today - National

  • The Dred Scott v. Sandford case served as a catalyst for providing blacks civil rights and civil liberties under the U.S. Constitution. Specifically, the case helped put an end to slavery in the United States and granted blacks citizenship, due process rights, equality under the law, and voting rights.Ironically, though, this expansion of rights and liberties to blacks did not come about from.
  • The Dred Scott decision did cause a genuine level of despair in northern black communities by the summer of 1856, and for some years after that. In speech after speech, in 1857 and '58, Frederick.
  • Organizations: The Dred Scott Heritage Foundation. The purpose of the Foundation is to support the acknowledgment of the 150th Anniversary of the Dred Scott Decision and support the attendant commemorative events that marked this momentous occasion and to be a vehicle for expanding the learning opportunities for individuals to be more educated about this case, its impact on slavery and the.
  • View Dred Scott Essay docx.docx from HIST 130 at College of the Mainland. The Dred Scott Case: The Impact of One Slave's Fight for Freedom Each year, the U.S. Supreme Court hears approximately
  • Because two states were now involved, Scott's appeal was filed in federal court in 1854 under the case name of Dred Scott v. John Sanford, the name that came before Taney in 1857. History is filled with dramatic and strange twists of irony and fate. Those factors can be found throughout Scott's battle for freedom
  • The Dred Scott case and its impact on this country too often have been undervalued in U.S. history. Scott was a Black man born around 1799 and had moved with the Peter Blow family from Virginia to St. Louis, Missouri. When Blow died, Scott was bought by Dr. John Emerson, an army surgeon
  • The Dred Scott Decision. Dred Scott was the name of an African-American slave. He was taken by his master, an officer in the U.S. Army, from the slave state of Missouri to the free state of Illinois and then to the free territory of Wisconsin

Dred Scott decision Definition, History, Summary

  1. Dred Scott was born into slavery in Virginia about 1799 and sold to an army physician, John Emerson, in 1830 in St. Louis. Emerson moved frequently for his army postings, first to Illinois, then to a frontier outpost of Fort Snelling in what is today Minnesota. It was at Fort Snelling that Dred Scott met and married Harriet Robinson
  2. On its way to the Supreme Court, the Dred Scott case grew in scope and significance as slavery became the single most explosive issue in American politics. By the time the case reached the high court, it had come to have enormous political implications for the entire nation. On March 6, 1857, Chief Justice Roger B. Taney read the majority.
  3. Dred Scott was born into slavery. During the 1830s, Scott's owner, a surgeon in the United States Army, took Scott to Illinois and Minnesota. At this time, slavery was illegal in Illinois and Minnesota was a free territory. In Minnesota, Scott married an enslaved woman, and she gave birth to a daughter

Dred Scott - Case, Civil War & Death - Biograph

This mini-lesson covers the basics of the Supreme Court decision that determined that Dred Scott, having lived in a free territory, was not entitled to his freedom. Students learn about the impact of the Court's decision, and how it was a stepping-stone to the Civil War. Students also examine the 13th, 14th, and 15th Amendments which overturned the decision, and the blac Jackson is the great-great-granddaughter of Dred Scott, a slave known for suing for his family's freedom. Taney is a descendant of the Supreme Court justice who denied them that freedom in 1857 Improve your social studies knowledge with free questions in Causes of the Civil War: Dred Scott to secession and thousands of other social studies skills The Dred Scott decision of 1857 went well beyond the question of whether or not Dred Scott gained his freedom. Instead, the Supreme Court delivered a far-reaching pronouncement about African Americans in the United States, finding they could never be citizens and that Congress could not interfere with the expansion of slavery into the territories Dred Scott (plaintiff) was an African American man born a slave in Virginia in the late 1700s. In 1830, he was taken by his owners to Missouri and purchased by Army Major John Emerson in 1832. Emerson took Scott with him on various assignments in Illinois and Wisconsin Territory, areas that outlawed slavery based on Congress's enactment of.

The Dred Scott Decision [ushistory

  1. Dred Scott, a slave, moved with his master, Dr. John Emerson, from Missouri, a slave state, to Illinois and Minnesota. While living in free territory, Scott considered himself a free man, but when he returned to Missouri, he returned to slavery. In 1856, in order to obtain his freedom, he sued his new owner, John Sanford. In March 1857, in Dred v
  2. Scott had brought suit in Missouri and hence he was still a slave because Missouri was a slave state. Taney ruled that the case be dismissed for lack of jurisdiction and sent back to the lower court with instructions for that court to dismiss the case for the same reason, therefore upholding the Missouri Supreme Court's ruling in favor of Sanford
  3. *On this date in 1857, the United States Supreme Court deecided the Dred Scott Case. It is believed by many to have been a key cause of the American Civil War, and of the ratification of the Thirteenth, Fourteenth, and Fifteenth Amendments to the United States Constitution, leading to the end of slavery and the beginning of civil rights for freed African slaves
  4. Scott's case was in Missouri, which had a big impact on the decision because Missouri was a slave state and the people there were biased about slavery. Dred Scott's case was the starting point for the end of slavery as it caught people's attention both in the North and the South
  5. e the rule of law? How might a true act of justice in this case have impacted the country? Do you believe a just ruling would have been easy or difficult for Taney to make? Why or why not? Duration: 20

Effects and Analysis - The Dred Scott Cas

repudiated decisions, Dred Scott carries the deepest stigma. If a proper criterion for evaluating a judicial decision is its success in achieving peaceable resolution of a social dispute, Dred Scott was a palpable failure indeed, its critics then and now have plausibly claimed that th This commentary will focus on the impact of the Dred Scott decision in America. Dred Scott was born a slave in Virginia to the family of Peter Blow originally. The family moved to St. Louis and sold Scott to Dr. John Emerson, a military surgeon stationed at Jefferson Barracks A focused video lecture explaining the Supreme Court case, Scott vs Sandford (1857), better known as the Dred Scott Decision. In this 12 minute video we look..

The Dred Scott Society is a pan-affinity group for all students of color (BIPOC & PGM), regardless of their specific race of nationality, who identify as being descendants of oppressed, colonized, segregated, and enslaved peoples (aka UDEC - United Descendants of the Enslaved and Colonized) Missouri State Archives: Dred Scott: 150th Anniversary Commemoration This Secretary of State Website offers a thorough study of the Dred Scott case as it moved through the Missouri court system and ended in the U.S. Supreme Court. Also of great interest is the link Conservation of the Dred Scott Papers, which shows how the State Archives. The Impact of the Dred Scott Decision on Slavery in U.S. Territories Name of Professor Dred Scott was an African-American slave. He struggled to gain his freedom by being a law-abiding individual

On March 6, 1857, the Supreme Court handed down its decision in the Dred Scott case, which had a direct impact on the coming of the Civil War and Abraham Lincoln's presidency four years later. The case of Dred Scott v. Sandford was one of the most controversial decisions in the court's history. At the time, the Supreme Court's majority of. The Reaction to the Dred Scott Decision. Alix Oswald. On March 6, 1857, Dred Scott's eleven-year struggle for freedom had finally come to an end. The Supreme Court of the United States rendered its decision, ruling that Dred Scott was still a slave. Even more controversially, the Court ruled that the Missouri Compromise wa The Supreme Court decision Dred Scott v. Sandford was issued on March 6, 1857. Delivered by Chief Justice Roger Taney, this opinion declared that African Americans were not citizens of the United States and could not sue in Federal courts When Dred Scott, a slave, was taken to the free Wisconsin territory, he tried to buy his freedom. When that failed, he sued that he should be set free because the Missouri Compromise dictated that..

Impact of the Dred Scott Case - UKEssays

  • ds of the people, the Northern press began a feeding frenzy on the subject
  • ation of the most famous example of judicial failure--the case referred to as the most frequently overturned decision in history. On March 6, 1857, Chief Justice Roger B. Taney delivered the Supreme Court's decision against Dred Scott, a slave who maintained he had been emancipated as a result of having lived with.
  • Generally regarded as the most odious ruling in the high court's history, the Dred Scott decision held that African-Americans, wherever they resided, could never be U.S. citizens. The decision also..
  • Welcome to Famous Trials, the Web's largest and most visited collection of original essays, trial transcripts and exhibits, maps, images, and other materials relating to the greatest trials in world history. Famous Trials first appeared on the Web in 1995, making this site older than about 99.97% of all websites. In 2016, the site seemed to be showing its age
  • In Dred Scott v. Sandford (argued 1856 -- decided 1857), the Supreme Court ruled that Americans of African descent, whether free or slave, were not American citizens and could not sue in federal..
  • On its way to the Supreme Court, the Dred Scott case grew in scope and significance as slavery became the single most explosive issue in American politics. By the time the case reached the high court, it had come to have enormous political implications for the entire nation

Dred Scott was an African American slave whose owner, army surgeon Dr. John Emerson, had taken Scott to numerous postings over the years in northern states and territories like Illinois and Wisconsin. John Emerson died in 1843. In 1846, Scott attempted to purchase freedom for himself and his family Emerson's widow, Irene, refused Dred Scott Case Background. Dred Scott was born into slavery in 1795. He moved from his home state of Virginia, with his slave master Peter Blow eventually settling in Saint Louis, Missouri in 1830. After the death of his first slave master he was eventually purchased by an army surgeon named John Emerson On March 6, 1857, in its Dred Scott decision, the Supreme Court ruled that Mr. Scott, a slave who had spent part of his life in non-slave territory, could not sue for his freedom in a federal court because, as the March 7 New York Times summarized, Negroes, whether slaves or free, that is, men of the African race, are not citizens of the United States by the Constitution Harriet Robinson Scott was a slave who tried for more than a decade to gain her freedom through the court system. In separate cases that were later combined, Harriet Scott and her husband, Dred, sued for their freedom before several courts in Missouri. Their case eventually reached the U.S. Supreme Court in Washington, DC In 1834, Dred Scott, an enslaved person, was purchased in Missouri and then brought to Illinois, a free (non-slave) state. He later moved with his enslaver to present-day Minnesota, where slavery had been recently prohibited, and then back to Missouri

Dred Scott was born a slave in Virginia. He was sold to Army Major John Emerson in Missouri, in 1830. Scott accompanied Emerson on multiple assignments in territories which outlawed slavery. Emerson allowed Scott to marry and left Scott and Scott's wife in Wisconsin and traveled to Louisiana on assignment. Emerson then married Eliza Sandford The 1857 Supreme Court case Dred Scott v. Sandford inflamed sectional tensions over slavery and propelled the United States toward civil war. In this video, Kim discusses the case with scholars Christopher Bracey and Timothy Huebner [The Dred Scott decision] gives the sanction of established law, and the guarantees of the Constitution, for all that the South has insisted upon in the recent struggles, and forces her adversaries to surrender their political organization against her rights, or assume openly the position of agitators against the Constitution During the performance I read from the text of 1857 Supreme Court Dred Scott Decision while a group of 4 nude Black performers was guarded and controlled two live German Shepherd dogs, which dogs barked continually. The audience was part of the work and had to pass through the men to go into a voting booth one at a time and respond to a.


More Comments:

Vince E Treacy - 11/20/2009

Mark Graber has torn Lincoln’s words from their context and distorted them to the point of falsification.

Graber quotes the words of Lincoln in his debate with Douglas in this way: "[T]he slaveholder [would have] the same [political] right to take his negroes to Kansas that a freeman has to take his hogs or his horses," Abraham Lincoln informed his fellow citizens, "if negroes were property in the same sense that hogs and horses are." Graber uses these words to argue that the dispute between Taney and most antebellum northerners was “whether the generally understood right to bring property into the territories entailed a right to bring human property into the territories. Once the issue is so defined, the holding in Dred Scott seems reasonable.”

But Lincoln never conceded that definition of the issue. Graber has distorted Lincoln’s words, because Lincoln never equated slaves to hogs and horses. Graber does this by cropping out the very next words that Lincoln said: “But is this the case? It is notoriously not so.” Lincoln continued to say that there are “400,000 free negroes in the United States.” Why? “These negroes are free, because their owners, in some way and at some time, felt satisfied that the creatures had mind, feeling, souls, family affections, hopes, joys, sorrows---something that made them more than hogs or horses.”

Here is Lincoln’s full quotation, with the online source. Judge for yourselves:

Mr. Lincoln: “It is said that the slaveholder has the same [political] (sic) right to take his negroes to Kansas that a freeman has to take his hogs or his horses. This would be true if negroes were property in the same sense that hogs and horses are. But is this the case? It is notoriously not so. Southern men do not treat their negroes as they do their horses. There are 400,000 free negroes in the United States. All the race came to this country as slaves. How came these negroes free? At $500 each, their value is $2,000,000. Can you find two million dollars worth of any other kind of property running about without an owner? These negroes are free, because their owners, in some way and at some time, felt satisfied that the creatures had mind, feeling, souls, family affections, hopes, joys, sorrows---something that made them more than hogs or horses. Shall the Slaveholders require us to be more heartless and mean than they, and treat those beings as property which they themselves have never been able to treat so?” Pages 245-46.

Unlike Graber’s distorted excerpt, a fair quotation of Lincoln would have read as follows:

Lincoln said “It is notoriously not so … that the slaveholder has the same [political] (sic) right to take his negroes to Kansas that a freeman has to take his hogs or his horses.” Lincoln added: “These negroes are free, because their owners, in some way and at some time, felt satisfied that the creatures had mind, feeling, souls, family affections, hopes, joys, sorrows---something that made them more than hogs or horses.”

I have provided the full quotation. Let the reader judge the historian’s use of his sources.

Note: The brackets around [political] are in the original source. Graber added the brackets aroune [would have> to Lincoln's quote.

John Edward Philips - 10/16/2006

War is not a game and you don't win on points. If it were the Confederates would have won the Civil War easily. As far as I know, the Confederate military is the only military which killed more US troops than vice versa, but that didn't mean they could beat a much bigger, better armed, and at least as determined foe.

Jason Blake Keuter - 10/15/2006

First, that the Constitution didn't take a stand against slavery is entirely consistent with what is supposed to be in the Constitution : a general reflection of consensus at the time. Few would dispute that the Constitution's "failure" to accelerate historical change and eliminate slavery, create universal suffrage, etc., would have killed it and arguably spelled the end of the US as an independent nation.

This doesn't mean that the Constitution sticks the Nation in the mud of a particular historical set of prejeudices. The Constitution can be amended and interpreted in light of what those who wrote the amendments intended. The amendment process is often seen as "laborious", as if it is designed to make amending the Constitution almost impossible, but it really isn't. The process of amendment is difficult if the proposed amendment lacks a broad consensus in the society at large. And that is the exact intent.

At the time of the Dred Scott decision, there was no national consensus on slavery and property and the rights of persons born in the United States. That consensus emerged at the end of the Civil War and was reflected in the 13th, 14th and 15th amendments. But this story is even more complicated because subsequent interpretations of those amendments (Slaughterhouse, etc) defied their clear intent.

Does this then speak to some kind of Hubris on the part of the Court? Not really. First, contemporaries were far from uniformly distressed by the Court's decisions. In sum, this suggests that the amendments that clearly should have prevented segregation and denial of political equality lacked the kind of consensus I mentioned earlier. When one takes into account that these amendments were put into place during Reconstruction (in other words, without the consent of the South), then it all makes sense.

By the mid 1950's, the Court interpreted these amendments in a manner consistent with their original language. The Citizen Councils, Little Rock and George Wallace (and the decade long Civil Rights Movement) all point to a lack of underlying consensus even at that point! In other words, while Dred Scott was out, Plessy was still standing - at least in the eyes of most of the country.

The Civil Rights Movement finally killed it and a consensus favoring eqaulity before the law was attained. Ironically, it was obtained only briefly. Soon the Court was broadening its interpretation of the Constitution beyond the bounds of societal consensus by supporting Affirmative Action, which, once again, turned the language of the 14th amendment on its head. It is a great irony that the politicized historians who beat their chests over the Plessy era Court's flagrant disregard for the intent of the 14th amendment, thunder just as vociferously against their contemporaries who wish the amendment to be respected now.

Knowing that the Civil Rights Movement established a consensus supporting equality before the law, the defenders of affirmative action immediately set themselves against it. They must look to the Court to defend affirmative action, and in the process demand that it ignore the Constitution. Ordniarily, if the Constitution is inadequate, one tries to amend it. But everyone knows an affirmative action amendment could never pass - the people are overwhelmingly against it. Which brings us to the last irony - the politicized historians who favor affirmative action thunder on and on about the subversion of democracy (usually by corporations), but are themselves dependent upon the most undemocratic branch of the government to preserve their policy wishes in the face of broad disagreement with those policies among the electorate at large.

Recall, in the last major affirmative action case it was a democraticaly elected, National Presidential administration facing off with state government, bureaucratic lifers from the University of Michigan : thus one could argue that the National government is taking a consistent position towards equality before the law while the states do not (Clinton's post Monica, beef up the base, loaded with pro-affirmative action traveling town-hall circuses aside). Which brings us back to the major sticking point surrounding most constitutional conflicts : state versus national sovereignty.

Robert Elliot Solot - 10/15/2006

It's inaccurate to say that the Dred Scott decision has no bearing on the origins of the civil war. For one thing, it exacerbated the polarized political climate. For another, it lead to the Fugitive Slave Law, which effectively brought slavery into states where it was illegal, because they were compelled to find and return fugitive slave to their owners. This further inflamed passions and brought the anti-slavery crusade into mainstream discourse, where it had been more or less restricted to religous nuts. The issue was resolved by a constitutional amendment, of course. While this was the result of the Civil War, it's inacurate to say that "a series of battlefield accidents enabled proponents of a more egalitarian policy to slaughter the proponents of greater racial inequality." They weren't accidents and the surrender of the South wasn't soley determined by unequal body-counts. The amendment passed because the US won the war and imposed it on the ex-Confederacy (which of course was under military rule and without voting rights at the time): to be re-admited into the union, these States were forced to ratify it.

Jaeffrey Jack Artz - 10/9/2006

Jaeffrey Jack Artz - 10/9/2006

The 5th Amendment Due Process issue was secondary to the primary (threshold) issue of plaintiff Scott's standing to sue. But cutting this off, the court never had to defend owner's DP right v deprivation of property (or just compensation, if you rationalize plaintiff's admission into court as a "public use" of owner's property). Lincoln knew that Taney had a choice, and could rationalize containment of slavery in the states where it was legal, and permit the loss of the "person's" property status upon migration to a territory where it was not legal but, under the political pressure of slaveowner interests, T gave in to the interpretation of the constitution (small "c" to indicate that I consider a document like the Declaration of Independence to be a part of the USA Constitution) that basically said, "Thomas Jefferson couldn't have actually meant everybody when he proclaimed that 'all men are created equal' he really meant 'white men', because he was one, and was owning slaves at the time he wrote the words." The most memorable quote from the lengthy (Taney's opinion alone was over 70 pages, and at least three other justices weighed in with opinions that brought the case to well over 100 pages) was, if I remember correctly, "a Negro has no rights that a white man need respect." Said quote came at the conclusion of his strenuous effort to refute the Declaration's "all men are created equal."

Oscar Chamberlain - 10/9/2006

Your desire to put Dred Scott in its historic context is a good one, and you are right to point out that Taney's interpretation of the Constitution is not outlandish in this context.

However, much of the disdain for this decision rests on Taney's attempt make the case a fundamental one. He could have simply argued that Scott had no standing to sue and stopped there. That would have been controversial in itself, but it would not have had near the impact as his ruling that slaves in commerce were no different than any other property. That seemed to many in the north to threaten to over turn the right of free states to keep slavery out.

I actually don't think that Taney would have ruled that way if such a case had come up, but he had opened the door to that possibility.

John Edward Philips - 10/9/2006

Let's accept the controversial argument that the Constitution follows the flag, because I do, even if the architects of Guantanamo detention don't. Let's accept for the sake of argument the claim that the slaves were nothing but property, even if the Federalist Papers defended the 3/5ths clause by claiming that they were both property and persons (which is, after all, how the Constitution referred to slaves). Let's even accept the claim that the Constitution was neither pro or anti slavery. Since it leaves it up to the individual states that's a good way to put it.

If Maine has a right, as it did, to prohibit alcoholic beverages, and if the Congress had the right (as it did) to prohibit slavery in the Northwest Territory, by what right could the Supreme Court decide that Congress lacked the power to prohibit the introduction of slave, or any other property in the territories? Heck, you can't even drive into California with fruit or vegetables in your car. They have a right to confiscate any such property, and Congress would have the same right to confiscate slaves brought into the territories.

I would accept the argument of the Missouri Supreme Court, that Dred Scott may not have legally been a slave in Minnesota, but when he voluntarily returned to Missouri he legally became a slave again. That would have legally returned Dred Scott to slavery without overturning decades of legislation for the territories.


Timeline of Samuel "Dred" Scott

In 1857, just a few years before the Emancipation Proclamation, an enslaved man named Samuel Dred Scott lost a fight for his freedom.

For almost ten years, Scott had struggled to regain his freedom--arguing that since he lived with his enslaver—John Emerson—in a free state, he should be free.

However, after a long battle, the United States Supreme Court ruled that since Scott was not a citizen, he could not sue in a federal court. Also, as an enslaved person, as property, he and his family had no rights to sue in a court of law either.

Samuel "Dred" Scott is born in Southhampton, Va.

Scott is sold to John Emerson, a United States army physician.

Scott and Emerson move to the free state of Illinois.

Scott marries Harriet Robinson, an enslaved man of another army doctor.


Issues

In the Case Scott v. Sandford was of such high impact due to the significant constitutional issues that it brought into question. We could start by pointing out the issue if a slave or African American were entitled to be able to sue in federal courts or not. Which brings us to the simplest question, was Dred Scott free or slave? If so, could an item of property, in this case, a slave (himself) be taken from its owner without fair compensation? They could argue Dred Scott was free by entering to a Free State. If Dred Scott was free upon entering a free state, it brings up the question of whether a former slave could be considered a citizen. By this it brings up the issue, are they entitled then to all the rights, privileges, and immunities granted to American citizens under the United States Constitution? These constitutional issues brought by the case Scott v. Sandford were of great historical and modern day importance, and revolutionized the judicial system till this day.


DRED SCOTT

In 1857, several months after President Buchanan took the oath of office, the Supreme Court ruled in Dred Scott v. Sandford . Dred Scott ([link]), born a slave in Virginia in 1795, had been one of the thousands forced to relocate as a result of the massive internal slave trade and taken to Missouri, where slavery had been adopted as part of the Missouri Compromise. In 1820, Scott’s owner took him first to Illinois and then to the Wisconsin territory. However, both of those regions were part of the Northwest Territory, where the 1787 Northwest Ordinance had prohibited slavery. When Scott returned to Missouri, he attempted to buy his freedom. After his owner refused, he sought relief in the state courts, arguing that by virtue of having lived in areas where slavery was banned, he should be free.


In a complicated set of legal decisions, a jury found that Scott, along with his wife and two children, were free. However, on appeal from Scott’s owner, the state Superior Court reversed the decision, and the Scotts remained slaves. Scott then became the property of John Sanford (his name was misspelled as “Sandford” in later court documents), who lived in New York. He continued his legal battle, and because the issue involved Missouri and New York, the case fell under the jurisdiction of the federal court. In 1854, Scott lost in federal court and appealed to the United States Supreme Court.

In 1857, the Supreme Court—led by Chief Justice Roger Taney, a former slaveholder who had freed his slaves—handed down its decision. On the question of whether Scott was free, the Supreme Court decided he remained a slave. The court then went beyond the specific issue of Scott’s freedom to make a sweeping and momentous judgment about the status of blacks, both free and slave. Per the court, blacks could never be citizens of the United States. Further, the court ruled that Congress had no authority to stop or limit the spread of slavery into American territories. This proslavery ruling explicitly made the Missouri Compromise unconstitutional implicitly, it made Douglas’s popular sovereignty unconstitutional.

In 1857, the United States Supreme Court ended years of legal battles when it ruled that Dred Scott, a slave who had resided in several free states, should remain a slave. The decision, written by Chief Justice Roger Taney, also stated that blacks could not be citizens and that Congress had no power to limit the spread of slavery. The excerpt below is from Taney’s decision.

A free negro of the African race, whose ancestors were brought to this country and sold as slaves, is not a “citizen” within the meaning of the Constitution of the United States. . . .

The only two clauses in the Constitution which point to this race treat them as persons whom it was morally lawfully to deal in as articles of property and to hold as slaves. . . .

Every citizen has a right to take with him into the Territory any article of property which the Constitution of the United States recognises as property. . . .

The Constitution of the United States recognises slaves as property, and pledges the Federal Government to protect it. And Congress cannot exercise any more authority over property of that description than it may constitutionally exercise over property of any other kind. . . .

Prohibiting a citizen of the United States from taking with him his slaves when he removes to the Territory . . . is an exercise of authority over private property which is not warranted by the Constitution, and the removal of the plaintiff [Dred Scott] by his owner to that Territory gave him no title to freedom.

How did the Supreme Court define Dred Scott? How did the court interpret the Constitution on this score?

The Dred Scott decision infuriated Republicans by rendering their goal—to prevent slavery’s spread into the territories—unconstitutional. To Republicans, the decision offered further proof of the reach of the South’s Slave Power, which now apparently extended even to the Supreme Court. The decision also complicated life for northern Democrats, especially Stephen Douglas, who could no longer sell popular sovereignty as a symbolic concession to southerners from northern voters. Few northerners favored slavery’s expansion westward.


History

Which of the following describes the impact the Dred Scott v. Sanford case had on slavery and enslaved persons?
A. It declared slavery to be unconstitutional
B. It denied Congress the power to abolish slavery in the territories
C. Though still legal, it gave enslaved people more rights
D. It left the decisions of slaves' rights up to individual states

How did the proposals in the Crittenden Compromise seek to avoid secession of the southern states? Select the two correct responses.
A. One proposal included reduced tariffs for the southern states.
B. One proposal included clear boundaries for where slavery could and couldn't exist.
C. One proposal included in the implementation of the Anaconda Plan.
D. One proposal included a clause to compensate slave owners if fugitives could not be returned.

Which strategies did the Union intend to use as part of its Anaconda Plan? Select the two correct responses.
A. to set up a naval blockade along the southern coast
B. to employ a more defensive strategy of surrounding borders and waiting for attacks
C. to seize control of the Mississippi River
D. to rely on European allies to provide them with supplies
E. to employ spies to infiltrate southern cities and spread panic and disinformation

What effect did the Emancipation Proclamation have on how the Civil War progressed? Select the two correct responses.
A. It decreased the likelihood that European countries would help the Confederacy.
B. It forced southern states to secede from the Union.
C. It extended the abolitionists' power to operate the Underground Railroad.
D. It gave African Americans the right to fight in the war.


The Dred Scott Decision


The Dred Scott v. Sanford Supreme Court case was a landmark decision in terms of slavery and anti-slavery arguments in antebellum America. Scott was a slave who was taken out of slave territory when his master, an army surgeon, moved to Illinois and then to Fort Snelling, in present-day Minnesota, during the 1830s. Scott sued for his freedom because he was taken out of slave territory, arguing that the Missouri Compromise prohibited slavery in Minnesota. The ruling in the case by Chief Justice Roger Taney stated that Scott and his family were slaves, not citizens, and did not have the right to sue in a federal court. In addition, the Court ruled that Scott's tenure in free territory did not make him a free man, and furthermore, that the Missouri Compromise was unconstitutional. Banning slavery conflicted with Article V of the Constitution, which stated that citizens could not be "deprived of life, liberty, or property, without due process of law," and slaves were considered property. As a result of the ruling, proslavery advocates felt their stance was reinforced and had gained the sanction of the law, while anti-slavery forces were furious. Republicans in particular condemned the decision and its implications that slavery could spread to the north.


Introduction

The Supreme Court decision Dred Scott v. Sandford was issued on March 6, 1857. Delivered by Chief Justice Roger Taney, this opinion declared that African Americans were not citizens of the United States and could not sue in Federal courts. Furthermore, this decision declared that the Missouri Compromise was unconstitutional and that Congress did not have the authority to prohibit slavery in the territories. The Dred Scott decision was overturned by the 13th and 14th Amendments to the Constitution.


Watch the video: Sound Smart: Dred Scott Case. History (August 2022).