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18 July 1943

18 July 1943

18 July 1943

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Eastern Front

Soviet Steppe Front joins Operation Kutuzov, the counterattack that followed the German defeat at Kursk.



Civilian Displacement: Hanford, WA

Stretching from coast to coast, the Manhattan Project grew into an enormous national effort during World War II, employing more than 600,000 temporary and permanent workers. In January 1943, the remote Hanford site in eastern Washington State was selected for the Manhattan Project’s top-secret site for plutonium production. The site occupied approximately 580,000 acres with some fifty miles of the Columbia River flowing through the high desert steppe. Within months, 50,000 workers were constructing the first-of-a-kind reactors and other plutonium production facilities.

Before the government took over, about two thousand people lived in the communities of White Bluffs, Hanford, and Richland or managed farms and orchards nearby. For centuries, four different Native American tribes enjoyed the land along Columbia River for camping, hunting, and fishing. Abruptly, the government notified them that they had to leave the land, disrupting their personal lives, communities, and traditional ways.


The U.S. Has A History Of Linking Disease With Race And Ethnicity

People eye each other with suspicion while dealing with the fear of Coronavirus.

(Encore episode.) The coronavirus is all over the headlines these days. Accompanying those headlines? Suspicion and harassment of Asians and Asian Americans.

Our colleague Gene Demby, co-host of NPR's Code Switch podcast, explains that this is part of a longer history in the United States of camouflaging xenophobia and racism as public health and hygiene concerns. We hear from historian Erika Lee, author of "America For Americans: A History Of Xenophobia In The United States."

LEARN MORE:
Check out Code Switch's full digital story and podcast episode.
And here's a collection of NPR's coverage on the rise in violence against Asian Americans.
Erika Lee's book "America for Americans: A History of Xenophobia in the United States"

Follow Code Switch hosts Gene Demby and Shereen Marisol Meraji on Twitter. They're @GeeDee215 and @RadioMirage. Plus, follow Emily on Twitter, @EmilyKwong1234, for her musings on science news.

As always, reach out to the show by e-mailing [email protected]

The Short Wave version of this episode was produced by Rebecca Ramirez, edited by Viet Le and fact-checked by Emily Vaughn.


18 July 1943 - History

The Division Hermann Göring was formed in October 1942 when Brigade Hermann Göring was upgraded with the addition of 5.000 Luftwaffe volunteers and Fallschirmjäger-Regiment 5 (remnants of three separate parachute units that had fought on Crete and on the Eastern front).
The main body of the division was sent to Tunisia January - March 1943 (Jäger-Regiment HG was sent to Africa in November 1942). The HG-units were known as Kampfgruppe Schmid (named after Generalmajor Schmid, commander of the advance section of the staff) and were sent to the southern sector of the front in February were they replaced Korps-Gruppe Weber.
It fought with distinction in Tunisia but was forced to surrender with the rest of the Axis troops in North Africa in May 1943 and only a few men from the units managed to escape.

It was reformed in May 1943 as Panzer-Division Hermann Göring.

Commanders

Generalmajor Paul Conrath (15 Oct 1942 - 20 May 1943)

Area of operations

France & Italy (Oct 1942 - Jan 1943)
North Africa (Jan 1943 - May 1943)

Holders of high awards

Holders of the German Cross in Gold (12)
- Bühl, Ernst, 05.02.1944, Leutnant, I./Jäg.Rgt. "HG" [also designated (per Kartei-Karte and DRK-Suchdienst) Fsch.Jg.Rgt. "HG" ]
- Franz, . 27.05.1943, Oberfeldwebel, 10./Jäg.Rgt. "HG"
- Jungwirt, Hans, 01.04.1943, Hauptmann, I./Jäg.Rgt. "HG"
- Kempa, Werner, 25.01.1943, Leutnant, Zugführer im Jäg-Rgt. “HG”
- Quednow, Fritz, 22.05.1943, Oberleutnant, 9./Jäg.Rgt. "HG"
- Schirmer, Gerhart, 25.06.1943, Hauptmann, Kdr. III./Jäg.Rgt. "HG"
- Spieler, Christian, 05.02.1944, Hauptmann, I./Jäg.Rgt. "HG"
- Wendelken, Heinz, 22.05.1943, Feldwebel, 12./Jäg.Rgt. "HG"
- Werner, Wilhelm, 16.03.1944, Major i.G., Ia Pz.Div. "HG" [officially] [for service as Ia Div. "GG" in North Africa]
- Wezel, Dr. Rudolf, 01.04.1943, Stabsarzt, x/Jäg.Rgt. "HG"
- Wöhler, Werner, 29.04.1943, Oberleutnant, 12./Jäg.Rgt. "HG"
- Zimmermann, Julius, 05.02.1944, Leutnant, I./Jäg.Rgt. "HG"
Holders of the Honor Roll Clasp of the Heer (1)
- [Heer] Jungwirt, Hans, 26.01.1943, Hauptmann, I./Jäg.Rgt. “HG” [a late war photo shows him (Major) wearing the Lw version]
Holders of the Knight's Cross (8)
- Hoefeld, Robert 18.05.1943 Oberleutnant Führer 4./Jäg.Rgt "HG"
- Kiefer, Eduard-Heinrich 18.05.1943 Hauptmann Chef 2./Pz.Aufkl.Abt „HG“
- Quednow, Fritz 05.04.1944 Hauptmann Chef 5./Jäg.Rgt „HG“
- Schäfer, Heinrich 08.08.1944 Oberfeldwebel Zugführer i. d. 4./Jäg.Rgt „HG“
- Scheid, Johannes 21.06.1943 Oberfeldwebel Zugführer i. d. 11./Gren.Rgt 1 „HG“
- Schmid, Joseph („Beppo“) 21.05.1943 Generalmajor Kdr der in Tunesien eingesetzten Teile der Division „General Göring“ [also called Kampfgruppe Schmid]
- Schreiber, Kurt 21.06.1943 Hauptmann Kdr II./Gren.Rgt 1 „HG“
- Witte, Heinrich 18.05.1943 Obergefreiter Richtkanonier i. d. 7./Flak-Rgt „HG“

Order of Battle

Stab
Musikkorps
Grenadier-Regiment 1 HG (Oberst Ewerth)
- I. Grenadier-Bataillon
- II. Grenadier-Bataillon
- III. Grenadier-Bataillon
- 13. (schwere) Infanteriegeschütz-Kompanie
- 14. Panzerjäger-Kompanie
Grenadier-Regiment 2 HG (Oberst Schmalz)
- I. Grenadier-Bataillon
- II. Grenadier-Bataillon
- III. Grenadier-Bataillon
Jäger-Regiment HG (Obest Koch)
- I. Jäger-Bataillon
- II. Jäger-Bataillon
Panzer-Regiment HG (Oberstleutnant Straub)
- I. Panzer-Abteilung
- II. Panzer-Abteilung
Flak-Regiment HG (Oberstleutnant Hullmann)
- I. Flak-Abteilung
- II. Flak-Abteilung
- III. Flak-Abteilung
- Führer-Flak-Abteilung
Artillerie-Regiment HG (Oberst Oering)
- I. Artillerie-Abteilung
- II. Artillerie-Abteilung
- III. Artillerie-Abteilung
- IV. Artillerie-Abteilung
- V. Sturmgeschütz-Abteilung
Aufklärungs-Abteilung HG (Hauptmann Brandenburg)
- Stabskompanie
- 1. Kradschützen-Kompanie
- 2. Volkswagen-Kompanie
- 3. Panzerspäh-Kompanie
- 4. Panzerjäger-Kompanie
- 5. (schwere) Kompanie
- 6. Flak-Kompanie (2 cm)
Panzer-Pionier-Bataillon HG
- 1. Panzer-Pionier-Kompanie
- 2. Panzer-Pionier-Kompanie
- 3. Panzer-Pionier-Kompanie
- 4. Panzer-Pionier-Kompanie
Panzer-Nachrichten-Abteilung HG (Major Bettlewski)
- Stabskompanie
- 1. Panzer-Nachrichten-Kompanie (Funk-Kompanie)
- 2. Panzer-Nachrichten-Kompanie (Fernsprech-Kompanie)
Sanitäts-Abteilung HG (Oberfeldarzt Dr. Blackstein)
- 1. Sanitäts-Bereitschaft
- 2. Sanitäts-Bereitschaft
- 3. Sanitäts-Bereitschaft
Nachschub-Regiment HG (Oberst Ritter)
- I. Nachschub-Abteilung (Oberstleutnant Rahlfs)
- II. Nachschub-Abteilung
- III. Nachschub-Abteilung (Oberstleutnant Schlegel)
Ersatz und Ausbildungs Regiment HG (Oberst Schultz)
Wach-Regiment (later redesignated Führer-Begleit-Regiment)
Feldgendarmerietrupp
Feldpostamt
Flygbereitschaft
Verwaltungsdienste
- Division-Verpflegungsamt
- Bäckerei-Kompanie
- Schlächterei-Kompanie

Notable members

Dr. jur. Heinz Göring (nephew of Reichsmarschall Hermann Göring killed in action 29 July 1944 near Pogorzel, east of Warsaw posthumously promoted to Hauptmann)
Eduard-Heinrich Kiefer (KC holder, post-war actor under the name Til Kiwe)

Insignia

The "Hermann Göring" cuff title was used by this unit.

The Kradschützen-Kompanie during a visit by Hermann Göring to the division in 1943

(From Der Adler 1943 #6)

Recruitment poster

(Courtesy of Daniel)

Sources used

Roger James Bender & George A. Petersen - Hermann Göring: From Regiment to Fallschirmpanzerkorps
George F. Nafziger - The Afrika Korps: An organizational history 1941-1943
Franz Kurowski - The history of the Fallschrim Panzerkorps Hermann Göring
Gordon Williamson - Afrikakorps 1941-43

Reference material on this unit

Roger James Bender & George A. Petersen - Hermann Göring: From Regiment to Fallschirmpanzerkorps
Franz Kurowski - The history of the Fallschrim Panzerkorps Hermann Göring
Alfred Otte - The HG Panzer Division
Bruce Quarrie - Fallschirmpanzerdivision ‘Hermann Göring’
Gordon Williamson - The ‘Hermann Göring’ Division


18 July 1943 - History

Image from Wikipedia. German Tiger tanks in the Northerrn Sector

Overview
To fully understand Germany’s inability to mount strategic offensives following the Battle of Kursk in 1943, it is essential to understand the status of the Wehrmacht on the Eastern Front in 1942 – along with the state of Germany’s capabilities and resulting ground efforts following that pivotal year. After the realization that a blitzkrieg through the vastness of the Soviet Union was not going to replicate the same quick, successful, walk though France they produced in 1940, Germany’s leaders were forced to maintain under-fed, under-supplied, battle-weary troops through the brutally harsh Russian winter of 1941-1942 – all by grossly over-extended supply lines. It was poor planning and leadership of Barbarossa, the subsequent actions at Moscow, Stalingrad, and their bid for the Caucasus region that led to weakened armies and more failure after the Battle of Kursk.

German Inability at Strategic Offensives following Kursk
While the Red Army enjoyed a quantitative advantage, the German soldier was a better-trained war fighter. The Soviets were able to overcome the qualitative advantage of the Wehrmacht through a seemingly endless supply of front-line troops. Zetterling and Frankson note the Soviet advantage in replacing ground troops in the latter half of 1943, following Kursk, in what became a war of attrition: “Replacements were wholly insufficient to cover the German losses, as less than 280,000 men arrived either as replacements or returning convalescents. Furthermore, the low German replacement rate was dwarfed by the influx of replacements to the Red Army, which must have received more than two million men as replacements, returning convalescents, and reinforcements.”[1]

Zetterling and Frankson offer that the Red Army’s greater numbers enabled Stalin and his generals to “dictate the broader events.”[2] The Wehrmacht was unable to plan key strategic offensives due to the overwhelming number of Red Army ground troops dictating the fighting the German armies were often fighting a defensive war, post-Kursk. The war in the skies of the Eastern Front late in 1943 was also affected by numbers, and attrition. Luftwaffe aircraft were bled-off from the Eastern Front in order to defend the homeland, this in response to the increase in allied bombing conversely, the Red Air Force grew and was able to support the soviet ground mission.[3]

Determinative Factors of Mid-war German Ineffectiveness
Hitler’s desire for Lebensraum, or “living space,” in order to feed the German people amidst the global economic crisis, provided the same challenges in feeding over-extended armies after the war had begun. This supply-issue was felt in armor and transportation for the Wehrmacht as well which, was not as severe for the Red Army thanks to the US Lend-Lease program. Under Albert Speer, Germany was able to dramatically increase steel production, and as a result, produce more armor. The problem for the Wehrmacht’s foot-soldier was that his armored support had been grossly out-produced on the home front, by the Allies: “The ultimate problem, however, was two-fold: for all its success, German armaments output in 1943, including tank production, was being swamped by that of its enemies. In that year alone, the Allies produced just about six times more aircraft, nearly five times the number of artillery pieces, and almost four times more tanks.”[4] Glantz and House offer that “After Kursk, the strength and combat effectiveness of the German armies in the East entered a period of almost constant decline. Periodic influxes of new conscripts and equipment, especially for the mechanized units and the Waffen SS, gave the defenders the means to conduct local counterattacks . . . Yet these attacks were steadily less effective, both due to the growing sophistication of the Soviet troops and the steady decay in the level of German training and effectiveness.”[5] Germany increasing suffered manpower shortages at home which led were felt on that battlefield although, the same shortage of manpower was felt by the Red Army.

Endnotes
1. Niklas Zetterling and Anders Frankson, The Korsun Pocket: The Encirclement and Breakout of a German Army in the East, 1944 (Philadelphia: Casemate, 2008) 10, 13.
2. Ibid., 36-37
3. Ibid., 40.
4. Stephen G. Fritz, Ostkrieg: Hitler’s War of Extermination in the East (Lexington: The University Press of Kentucky, 2011) 330.
5. David M. Glantz and Jonathan House, When Titans Clashed: How the Red Army Stopped Hitler (Lawrence: University Press of Kansas, 1995) 179.

Bibliography
Fritz, Stephen G. Ostkrieg: Hitler’s War of Extermination in the East. Lexington: The University Press of Kentucky, 2011.

Glantz, David M. and Jonathan House. When Titans Clashed: How the Red Army Stopped Hitler. Lawrence: University Press of Kansas, 1995.

Stahel, David. Operation Barbarossa and Germany’s Defeat in the East. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2009. Page references are to the 2010 edition.

Zetterling, Niklas and Anders Frankson. The Korsun Pocket: The Encirclement and Breakout of a German Army in the East, 1944. Philadelphia: Casemate, 2008.


Improvements and fixes in the update

The following update will be listed as “System Firmware Update – 2/24/2016” when you view your update history.

Note: When Surface updates are provided via the Windows Update service, they are delivered in stages to Surface customers. As a result, not every Surface will receive the update at the same time, but the update will be delivered to all devices. If you have not received the update then please manually check Windows Update later.

Surface Pro System Aggregator Firmware update (v2.84.450.0) eliminates instances where the device wakes randomly.

Surface Cover Audio driver update (v1.0.360.0) improves system stability when detaching the cover.

The following updates will be listed as "System Firmware Update - 7/28/2015" or “System Hardware Update – 7/28/2015” when you view your update history.

Note: When Surface updates are provided via the Windows Update service, they are delivered in stages to Surface customers. As a result, not every Surface will receive the update at the same time, but the update will be delivered to all devices. If you have not received the update then please manually check Windows Update later.

HD Graphics 4000 driver update (v10.18.10.4252) improves graphics performance and stability on Windows 10.

Surface Accessory Device driver update (v1.0.358.0) resolves issue where Surface would wake from sleep by itself.

The following updates will be listed as “System Firmware Update – 1/15/2015” when you view your update history.

Note: When Surface updates are provided via the Windows Update service, they are delivered in stages to Surface customers. As a result, not every Surface will receive the update at the same time, but the update will be delivered to all devices. If you have not received the update, please manually check Windows Update later.

Surface Pro UEFI update (v1.7.50) enhances system security.

The following updates will be listed as “System Firmware Update – 8/12/2014” or “System Hardware Update – 8/12/2014” when you view your update history.

Note: When Surface updates are provided via the Windows Update service, they are delivered in stages to Surface customers. As a result, not every Surface will receive the update at the same time, but the update will be delivered to all devices. If you have not received the update, please manually check Windows Update later.

Wireless Network Controller and Bluetooth® (v14.69.24054.176) improves network connection stability and enables functionality on Wi-Fi networks using a hidden SSID.

The following updates will be listed as “System Firmware Update – 7/8/2014” in the Windows Update History.

Note: When Surface updates are provided via the Windows Update service, they are delivered in stages to Surface customers. As a result, not every Surface will receive the update at the same time, but the update will be delivered to all devices. If you have not received the update, please manually check Windows Update later.

Surface Pro System Aggregator Firmware (v2.84.0350) improves battery management when a Surface Cover is attached.

Surface Pro UEFI (v1.6.350) provides support for PXE boot with the new Surface Ethernet Adapter.

Intel(R) HD Graphics 4000 (v10.18.10.3496) improves Miracast wireless display experience and enhances display stability.

Intel(R) Display Audio (v6.16.00.3135) enhances compatibility and improves the display experience for DisplayPort monitors.

Surface Accessory Device (v1.0.338.0) improves the experience when using Surface accessories.

Surface Power Cover Firmware update (v1.0.339.0) improves the experience when using Surface Power Cover.

The following updates will be listed as “System Hardware Update – 3/11/2014” when you view your update history.

Surface Type Cover 2 Firmware Update Device (v1.0.317.0) update improves multiple finger support on the touchpad.

Surface Touch Cover 2 Firmware Update Device (v1.0.317.0) update improves multiple finger support on the touchpad.

Surface Power Cover Firmware Update (v1.0.323.0) provides support for Surface Power Cover.

The following updates will be listed as “System Firmware Update – 3/11/2014” when you view your update history.

Marvell AVASTAR 350N Wireless Network Controller (v14.69.24052.168) resolves wireless network connectivity issues.

Marvell AVASTAR Wireless Composite Device (v14.69.24052.168) improves Miracast support.

Marvell AVASTAR Bluetooth Radio Adapter (v14.69.24052.168) updates as part of a driver package that includes the Marvell Wireless Network Controller and Marvell Wireless Composite Device. There are no Bluetooth updates in this version of the driver.

Surface Type Cover 2 Firmware Update Device (v1.0.317.0) update improves multiple finger support on the touchpad.

Surface Touch Cover 2 Firmware Update Device (v1.0.317.0) update improves multiple finger support on the touchpad.

Surface Power Cover Firmware Update (v1.0.323.0) provides support for Surface Power Cover.

Windows 8.0 and 8.1 updates:

Surface Pro Embedded Controller Firmware (v9.00.50) resolves behavior where the Surface would reset when waking from sleep.

Surface Pro System Aggregator Firmware (v2.84.0150)

Resolves issue where Surface would reset if the Surface Cover were repeatedly attached and detached.

Resolves issue where On Screen Keyboard would unexpectedly pop up even though Surface Cover is attached.

Resolves issue where Surface Cover is not detected after wake up from sleep.

Surface Pro UEFI (v1.6.50) improves experience when using a Surface Cover on Surface Pro.

Surface Type Cover 2 firmware

These updates improve the experience of using a second-generation Surface Cover on your first-generation Surface Pro running Windows 8.1, including touchpad performance and overall product stability.

Surface Touch Cover 2 firmware

These updates improve the experience of using a second-generation Surface Cover on your first-generation Surface Pro running Windows 8.1, including touchpad performance and overall product stability.

Updated Wi-Fi and Bluetooth driver version 14.69.24049.160 enhances Miracast functionality and improves Wi-Fi stability.

Surface Type Cover 2 Firmware Update Device, version 1.0.279.0

These updates improve the experience of using a second-generation Surface Cover on your first-generation Surface Pro running Windows 8.0, including touchpad performance and overall product stability.

Surface Touch Cover 2 Firmware Update Device, version 1.0.280.0

These updates improve the experience of using a second-generation Surface Cover on your first-generation Surface Pro running Windows 8.0, including touchpad performance and overall product stability.


18 Rules Of Behavior For Young Ladies In 1831

Sketch of an unidentified woman, between 1830 and 1860.

"This is indeed," the Adams Sentinel in Gettysburg, Pa., proclaimed on Feb. 24, 1830, "the age of improvement."

The proclamation was part of a story about the Moral Encyclopaedia, a set of self-teaching books by a writer identified as "Charles Varle, Esq. of Baltimore."

An advocate of autodidacticism and good old American self-reliance, Varle explains in the introduction to the third, long-windedly titled volume — Varlé's Self-instructor, No. 3, in Literature, Duties of Life, and Rules of Good Breeding: Interspersed with Popular Quotations, Mottos, Maxims, and Adages, in Latin and Other Languages : Also with the French Words Generally Met with in Newspapers, and Works of Taste and Fancy, Faithfully Translated -- that he got the idea of writing an instructional book from Thomas Jefferson.

At a meeting in Philadelphia, Varle writes, Jefferson — then vice-president — suggested that someone should compile a book of English translation of some European words and phrases often found in American newspapers. Varle was at the gathering and he not only took Jefferson's challenge to heart, he turned the idea into a more comprehensive self-help guide — as the book's subtitle purports.

The 301-page eclectic collection contains: snippets of contemporary speeches colloquial maxims quotes from Shakespeare, the Bible and ancient philosophers and dozens of translations of internationalisms.

To get a glimpse into what one slice of American society resembled in the 1830s, here are some excerpts — in abecedary form and with original spelling — from Varle's section labeled: "Rules of behavior for Young Ladies, partly extracted from this work and the most celebrated books on Ladies education."


1st Infantry Division: The Big Red One

Tracing its heritage to the First World War, the 1st Infantry Division, also know as the ‘‘Big Red One,’’ became the most recognized U.S. Army formation of World War II. Early wartime training was conducted under Maj. Gen. Donald Cubbison, and Maj. Gen. Terry de la Mesa Allen led the division to England and Africa in 1942. Major General Clarence R. Huebner assumed command during the Sicilian operation in July 1943.

Returning to England in November, the division went ashore at Omaha Beach on 6 June as part of Major General L. T. Gerow’s V Corps. Throughout the war the 1st Infantry Division was composed of the Sixteenth, Eighteenth, and Twenty-sixth Infantry Regiments, plus the Fifth, Seventh, Thirty-second, and Thirty-third Field Artillery Battalions. For D-Day the division was reinforced with the 116th Infantry of the Twenty-ninth Division.

  • Sixteenth Infantry: Col. George A. Taylor.
  • Eighteenth Infantry: Col. George Smith, Jr.
  • Twenty-sixth Infantry: Col. John F. Seitz.
  • 116th Infantry: Col. Charles D. W. Canham.

On Omaha Beach, Second Battalion, Sixteenth Infantry found a way through the defenses at the E-1 draw leading inland, permitting the Eighteenth and 116th Regiments to advance from ‘‘Easy Red’’ sector. On D+2 the attached 116th Infantry from the Twenty-ninth Division relieved the Second Ranger Battalion at Pointe du Hoc.

One community hard hit on D-Day was Bedford, Virginia, which lost twenty-one of the thirty-five of its citizens in Company A, 116th Infantry. Landing against ferocious opposition, nineteen of the men were killed in the first fifteen minutes ashore. Through two and a half years of combat, the 1st Infantry Division suffered many casualties and lost 19,400 men, including 4,280 killed—a toll exceeded only by four other divisions.

This article is part of our larger selection of posts about the Normandy Invasion. To learn more, click here for our comprehensive guide to D-Day.

You can also buy the book by clicking on the buttons to the left.


Info Russian 18th Tank Corps

Post by Andy H » 22 Jan 2004, 02:52

From the wreckage of the tank battles of 1941, a new philosophy of organization was born for the Soviet armored forces. The complexity of the pre-war units was not sustainable, so simpler units were evolved. Beginning in August 1941, Tank brigades were formed. Below is an example of the evolution of the 18th Tank Corps from its formation in 1942 through the war until its last action in Hungary in 1945. We start with the 110th Tank Brigade to show the main combat arm of the corps.

Table of Organization & Equipment for the 110th Tank Brigade

Strength Type
1,265 Men
10 KV-1a tanks
22 T-34a tanks
20 T-60 tanks
8 8.2cm Mortars
36 Machineguns
3 Cars
56 Trucks

The tank brigades were about the size of a German Battalion with an official Table of Organization (TOE) of 1,300 men, 52 tanks, and a small collection of support guns and mortars. They were all teeth, and no depth which showed when the brigades came in close contact with the German Army forces. Often the tank brigades were thrown together whenever fresh equipment and men were available. This left them with less than their full complement of men under equipped and with little training. It was expected that these formations would simply disappear on contact with the enemy. Almost no logistical support was provided to the tank brigades. The theory was brutal and simple if relieved by other friendly forces then supply would be available.

To address this issue, the Tank Corps was developed. Simply put, the new Soviet Corps was a brigade bucket of about 9,000 men. While it was larger, it had almost no more depth and attrited in combat quickly. The 18th was typical of this organization.

Table of Organization & Equipment for 18th Tank Corps - June 1942

Strength Type
8,794 Men
30 KV-1a tanks
66 T-34a tanks
60 T-60 tanks
8 BM-8-36 rockets
9 5cm Mortars
12 3.7cm Anti-Aircraft
16 7.62cm Cannons
69 8.2cm Mortars
276 Machineguns
2 Cars
10 BA-10 Armored Cars
64 Wagons
609 Trucks

The 18th Corps was formed from 3 independent tank brigades. The 110th, the 180th, and the 181st, all formed by the Volga Military District, in March, 1942. In June, they were all then sent to Moscow Military District, and reformed as the 18th Tank Corps. In July, the 18th, was assigned to the Bryansk Front, and from there, sent the Voronezh Front. The unit suffered badly during the German drive on Stalingrad and was withdrawn to the Volga Military District in October where it was rebuilt.

Table of Organization & Equipment for 18th Tank Corps - October 1942

Strength Type
8,869 Men
10 KV-1a tanks
84 T-34a tanks
62 T-60 tanks
8 BM-8-36 rockets
9 5cm Mortars
12 3.7cm Anti-Aircraft
16 7.62cm Cannons
69 8.2cm Mortars
276 Machineguns
3 Cars
10 BA-10 Armored Cars
680 Trucks

The 180th Tank Brigade being substituted with the 170th. The KV companies were replaced by T-34 companies in the original tank brigades, but the 170th kept their KV’s. In November the 18th was assigned to the 57th Army, Southwestern Front. By December, it was assigned to the 1st Guards Tank Army and participated in the Stalingrad operations. By February 1943, with almost no remaining assets, the Corps was sent into STAVKA, and was completely rebuilt.

Table of Organization & Equipment for 18th Tank Corps - July 1943

Strength Type
12,328 Men
21 KV-1s tanks
129 T-34a tanks
60 T-70 tanks
8 BM-8-36 rockets
18 5cm Mortars
36 12cm Mortars
36 3.7cm Anti-Aircraft
36 7.62cm Cannons
63 8.2cm Mortars
258 Machineguns
2 Cars
32 BA-64 Armored Cars
715 Trucks

In July 1943, the 18th was assigned to the 5th Guards Tank Army and participated in the Kursk battles. The 18th Tank Corps went on to liberate Kharkov during that same month. It was in steady combat throughout out the year, with the 110th and the 181st brigades receiving the group honorific, “Znamenskikh”.

After a summer of heavy fighting, the Corps had a serious upgrade in equipment, replacing all the light T-70’s with T-34’s, replacing the depleted 36th Guards Heavy Tank Regiment with the 1543rd Heavy SU Regiment. Most, if not all, of the infantry companies were converted to Sub-Machine Gun companies.

Table of Organization & Equipment for 18th Tank Corps - 1944

The unit remained in heavy combat throughout the winter with the brigades piling up casualties and honors, with the 110th and the 181st, earning the Order of the Red Banner, and 170th, “Kirovogradskikh”.

Strength Type
10,775 Men
270 T-34a tanks
20 ISU-152 tank destroyers
8 BM-8-48 rockets
18 8.2cm Mortars
36 12cm Mortars
36 3.7cm Anti-Aircraft
36 5.7cm ZIS-2s
48 Machineguns
2 Cars
32 BA-64 Armored Cars
800 Trucks
http://www.lostbattalion.com/home_adwords_18TC.html

Post by Craig Crofoot » 23 Jan 2004, 02:02

I'm not sure where LBG got their information on the OB for the 18th Tank Corps (and the other Soviet formations) on their web site, but I can update the information on the units organization.

I can not only provide the combat units, but also the the service units as well. I checked the LBG web site and their service units are completely wrong. My source is Soviet military source book published in 1956 and nopt available in the west.

Post by Andy H » 23 Jan 2004, 20:57

Thanks for the headsup. Is the information so wrong as to be mis-information?, for if it is I'll pull the thread.

Post by Craig Crofoot » 24 Jan 2004, 00:46

It's more a lack of unit information. I don't have anything on the equipment totls, but I took a look on the web site and some of the unit breakdowns are wrong.

Let me a take a look this weekend and see what I can come up with.

Post by Craig Crofoot » 31 Jan 2004, 18:43

To everyone, here is my information on the 18th Tank Corps from 1942-1948:

Commanders:
Chernyakhovskii, Ivan Danilovich (General-Major) 15 June 1942 – 25 July 1942
Korchagin, Ivan Petrovich (General-Major of Tank Forces) 26 July 1942 – 10 September 1942
Bakharev, Boris Sergeevich (Colonel) 11 September 1942 – 25 July 1943
Yegorov, Aleksandr Vasil’evich (Colonel) 26 September 1943 – 10 September 1943
(promoted to General-Major of Tank Forces 14 October 1942)
Trufanov, Kuz’ma Grigor’evich (General-Major) 11 September 1943 – 16 October 1943
Firsovich, Aleksandr Nikolaevich (Colonel) 17 October 1943 – 23 December 1943
Polozkov, Vasilii Iudovich (General-Major of Tank Forces) 24 December 1943 – 28 August 1944
Kolesnikov, Ivan Mikhailovich (Colonel) 29 August 1944 – 23 September 1944
Govorunenko, Petr Dmitrievich (General-Major of Tank Forces) 24 September 1944 – 9 May 1945
(promoted to General-Lieutenant of Tank Forces 19 April 1945)

Chiefs-of-Staff:
Yeremeev, Boris Romanovich (Colonel) 7 July 1942 – 20 September 1942
Guschenko, Ivan Vasil’evich (Colonel) 20 September 1942 -- ?? February 1943
Kolesnikov, Ivan Mikhailovich (Colonel) ?? February 1943 -- ?? May 1943
Borob’ev, Konstantin Konstantinovich (Colonel) ?? May 1943 – 10 September 1943
Smirnov, Vladimir Ivanovich (Lieutenant-Colonel) 10 September 1943 – 24 December 1943
Belozerov, Fedor Mikhailovich (Colonel) 24 December 1943 – 9 May 1945

Active Army:
(The Active Army was the designation used for those forces assigned to an active combat Front, such as the war with Germany from 22 June 1941 to 11 May 1945 and with Japan from 9 August 1945 to 3 September 1945.)
4 July 1942 – 1 October 1942
28 November 1942 – 24 March 1943
10 July 1943 – 9 September 1943
7 October 1943 – 9 May 1945

Assigned Units:
110th Tank Brigade
170th Tank Brigade (assigned in October 1942)
180th Tank Brigade (assigned June to October 1942)
181st Tank Brigade
18th Motorized Rifle Brigade (assigned June to September 1942)
32nd Motorized Rifle Brigade (assigned in December 1942)
36th Guards Tank Regiment (assigned in May 1943)
1438th Self-Propelled Artillery Regiment (assigned in December 1943)
1543rd Self-Propelled Artillery Regiment (assigned in October 1943)*(removed in February 1944)
363rd Guards Heavy Self-Propelled Artillery Regiment (assigned in August 1944)
452nd Light Artillery Regiment (assigned in September 1944)**
1694th Anti-Aircraft Artillery Regiment (assigned in May 1943)
52nd Separate Motorcycle Battalion (assigned in September 1942)(removed February 1943)
78th Separate Motorcycle Battalion (assigned in August 1943)
1st Separate Armored Car Battalion (assigned in December 1942) (removed February 1943)
1000th Anti-Tank Artillery Regiment (assigned in April 1943)
736th Separate Anti-Tank Artillery Battalion (assigned in June 1943)
292nd Mortar Regiment (assigned in April 1943)
106th Guards Mortar Battalion (Rocket Launchers) (assigned in October 1943)
419th Separate Signals Battalion (assigned sometime between March – July 1943)
115th Separate Sapper Battalion (assigned sometime between March – July 1943)
(Note: this is a Construction Engineer, not a Combat Engineer unit)
119th Separate Chemical Defense Company (assigned in July 1943)
22nd Separate Auto-Transport Company (Supplies) (assigned between October and November 1942)
139th Field Tank Repair Base (assigned in August 1942)
104th Field Vehicle Repair Base (assigned in August 1942)
Aviation Flight (assigned between March – July 1943)
45th Mobile Field Bakery (assigned between March – July 1943)
2133rd Military-Postal Station (assigned in August 1942)
* designated “Heavy” in January 1944
** designated “Anti-Tank Artillery” in November 1944)

Assignments:
1 July 1942: Reserves of the Headquarters of the Supreme High Command (Stavka VGK)
1 August 1942 60th Army, Voronezh Front
1 September 1942 60th Army, Voronezh Front
1 October 1942 60th Army, Voronezh Front
1 November 1942 Volga Military District
1 December 1942 Front Reserves, Southwestern Front
1 January 1943 1st Guards Army, Southwestern Front
1 February 1943 Podvizh Operational Group, Southwestern Front
1 March 1943 1st Guards Army, Southwestern Front
1 April 1943 Reserves of the Headquarters of the Supreme High Command (Stavka VGK)
1 May 1943 Reserves of the Headquarters of the Supreme High Command (Stavka VGK)
1 June 1943 Reserves of the Headquarters of the Supreme High Command (Stavka VGK)
1 July 1943 Reserves of the Headquarters of the Supreme High Command (Stavka VGK)
1 August 1943 5th Guards Tank Army, Voronezh Front
1 September 1943 5th Guards Tank Army, Steppe Front
1 October 1943 5th Guards Tank Army, Reserves of the Headquarters of the Supreme High Command
1 November 1943 5th Guards Tank Army, 2nd Ukrainian Front
1 December 1943 5th Guards Tank Army, 2nd Ukrainian Front
1 January 1944 5th Guards Tank Army, 2nd Ukrainian Front
1 February 1944 5th Guards Tank Army, 2nd Ukrainian Front
1 March 1944 5th Guards Tank Army, 2nd Ukrainian Front
1 April 1944 5th Guards Tank Army, 2nd Ukrainian Front
1 May 1944 5th Guards Tank Army, 2nd Ukrainian Front
1 June 1944 Front Reserves, 2nd Ukrainian Front
1 July 1944 Front Reserves, 2nd Ukrainian Front
1 August 1944 Front Reserves, 2nd Ukrainian Front
1 September 1944 6th Tank Army, 2nd Ukrainian Front
1 October 1944 53rd Army, 2nd Ukrainian Front
1 November 1944 Front Reserves, 2nd Ukrainian Front
1 December 1944 Front Reserves, 3rd Ukrainian Front
1 January 1945 Front Reserves, 3rd Ukrainian Front
1 February 1945 Front Reserves, 3rd Ukrainian Front
1 March 1945 Front Reserves, 3rd Ukrainian Front
1 April 1945 Front Reserves, 3rd Ukrainian Front
1 May 1945 Front Reserves, 3rd Ukrainian Front

Awards:
“Znamenka”
“Budapest”
Order of Red Banner
Order of Suvorov
Order of Kutuzov

Post-War History:
Reorganization to the 18th Tank Division in July 1945
Returned to USSR in last-half of 1945 (Carpathian Military District)
Disbanded in 1948


Improvements and fixes in the update

The following update will be delivered as multiple updates when you view your update history:

System Firmware Update – 2/24/2016

Intel Corporation driver update for Intel® HD Graphics Family

Note: When Surface updates are provided via the Windows Update service, they are delivered in stages to Surface customers. As a result, not every Surface will receive the update at the same time, but the update will be delivered to all devices. If you have not received the update then please manually check Windows Update later.

Surface Pro System Aggregator Firmware update (v2.4.450.0) eliminates instances where the device wakes randomly.

Surface Cover Audio driver update (v2.0.306.0) improves system stability when detaching the cover.

Microsoft Surface ACPI-Compliant Control Method Battery driver update (v1.2.0.2) ensures correct surface driver is installed.

Intel® HD Graphics Family driver update (v20.19.15.4331) improves color calibration and system stability.

Intel® Display Audio driver update (v6.16.00.3189) supports compatibility with the updated HD Graphics Family driver.

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HD Graphics Family driver update (v10.18.15.4256) improves graphics performance and stability on Windows 10.

The following updates will be listed as “System Firmware Update – 7/23/2015” or “System Hardware Update – 7/23/2015” when you view your update history.

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HD Graphics Family driver update (v10.18.15.4248) improves graphics performance and stability on Windows 10.

Surface Integration driver update (v2.0.304.0) resolves the issue where Surface would wake from sleep by itself.

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Surface Pro UEFI update (v2.5.250.0) includes changes needed for compatibility with the updated graphics driver.

HD Graphics Family driver update (v10.18.14.4170) improves graphic performance and includes better Miracast (wireless display) support.

Display Audio driver update (v6.16.00.3172) improves audio experience and supports compatibility with the updated graphics driver.

The following updates will be listed as “System Firmware Update – 1/15/2015” when you view your update history.

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Surface Pro UEFI update (v2.05.0150) improves the PXE boot experience with the 1 gigabit Surface Ethernet Adapter and further enhances the system security.

HD Graphics Family driver update (v10.18.14.4029) enhances display stability and performance, improves user experience when using Miracast adapters, and improves compatibility with DisplayPort monitors and daisy chaining.

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Wireless Network Controller (v14.69.24054.176) enables functionality on wireless networks using hidden SSIDs.

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Surface Pro UEFI (v2.4.950.0) and Surface Pro Embedded Controller Firmware (v24.1.50.0) updates enhance system stability with microSD products, improve compatibility with Power Cover, and increase the reliability of sleep state transitions. Surface Pro UEFI update also provides support for PXE boot with the new Surface Ethernet Adapter.

Surface Pro System Aggregator Firmware (v2.4.350.0) update improves sleep state transitions when a Surface Cover is attached.

Surface Accessory Device (v2.0.287.0) update improves sleep state transitions when a Surface Cover is attached.

Surface Power Cover Firmware Update (v2.0.288.0) improves reliability when the Power Cover is attached to Surface and folded behind Surface.

HD Graphics Family (v10.18.10.3496) update improves Miracast wireless display experience and enhances display stability.

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Surface Pro UEFI (v2.04.0450) improves

experience when using BitLocker so that a Surface Cover can provide PIN input.

Surface Touch Cover 2 Firmware Update Device (v2.0.262.0) update improves multiple finger support on the touchpad.

Surface Type Cover 2 Firmware Update Device (v2.0.262.0) update improves multiple finger support on the touchpad.

Surface Power Cover Firmware Update Device (v2.0.268.0) provides support for Surface Power Cover.

Surface Cover Telemetry (v2.0.229.0) improves stability and experience for Surface Covers.

Marvell AVASTAR 350N Wireless Network Controller (v14.69.24052.168) resolves wireless network connectivity issues.

Marvell AVASTAR Wireless Composite Device (v14.69.24052.168) improves Miracast support.

Marvell AVASTAR Bluetooth ® Radio Adapter (v14.69.24052.168) updated as part of a driver package that includes the Marvell Wireless Network Controller and Marvell Wireless Composite Device. There are no Bluetooth updates in this version of the driver.

Intel(R) Display Audio (v6.16.00.3135) improves Miracast support.

Intel(R) HD Graphics Family (v10.18.10.3431) improves Miracast support and enables daisy chaining of monitors using DisplayPort 1.2.

Intel WiDi Audio Device (v4.5.44.0) improves Miracast support.

Surface Display Panel (v1.0.2.0) provides tuning to the Surface display calibration.

Surface Pro Embedded Controller Firmware (v24.00.50)

Resolves issue where Surface would not go into hibernation.

Resolves issue where available battery percentage was reported incorrectly.

Surface Pro System Aggregator Firmware (v2.04.0150)

Resolves issue where Surface would reset upon repeated attaching and detaching of Surface Cover.

Resolves issue where On Screen Keyboard would unexpectedly pop up even though Surface Cover is attached.

Resolves issue where Surface Cover is not detected after wake up from sleep.

Surface Touch Cover 2 Firmware Update Device (v2.0.228.0) update improves two-finger touchpad use.

Surface Type Cover 2 Firmware Update Device (v2.0.226.0) update improves two-finger touchpad use.

Updated UEFI firmware, version 2.04.0350, to resolve behavior where the Surface failed to enter sleep while idle, reducing battery life.

Performance optimization for Touch Cover 2 and Type Cover 2.

Battery life improvements.

System performance and stability improvements.

Wi-Fi network performance improvements.

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