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Oratamin YTB-347 - History

Oratamin YTB-347 - History


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Oratamin
(YTB-347: dp. 218; 1. 100'; b. 25'; dr. 9'7"; cpl. 12; s. 16 k. T. V2-ME-A1)

Oratamin (YTB-347), ex- YT-347, ex- Port Kent, exM.C. Hull 451, was built by Ira S. Bushey & Sons, Inc. Brooklyn, N. Y.; launched for the Maritime Commission 23 December 1942; completed 15 February 1943, and immediately taken over by the Navy. Her first Fleet assignment took her to the 10th Naval District, where she provided multifaceted tug services in San Juan Harbor through 1951.

Oratamin then shifted to the 5th Naval District for duty in the Tidewater regions of Norfolk and Hampton, Va. Redesignated YTM-347 in February 1962, she remains active out of Norfolk through 1969.


How the American Museum of Natural History addressed a dated diorama

Today, millions of Americans will sit down to enjoy a Thanksgiving Day spread of turkey, cranberry sauce, mashed potatoes, pumpkin pie, and a plethora of other artery-clogging foods, yet delicious, foods. Presently, Thanksgiving is more or less a day in which many spend time with family and think of all the things they’re thankful for in life, large and small. It isn’t often a day when people take a long, hard look at the oppressive history of the holiday.

While the narrative is beginning to change, historically, Thanksgiving Day is taught as a day when European settlers broke bread with Native American tribes after the two groups worked together so that the settlers were able to sustain life. It’s a picturesque idea but we know and are now quicker to recognize that that was not at all the way history really played out.

One way in which the narrative has been adjusted is at the American Museum of Natural History (AMNH) where one of its dioramas got a bit of a facelift last year. Known as the ‘Old New York Diorama,’ it was originally built in 1939 and over the last decade or so, it had received its fair share of question and critique.

The life-size model depicts a 1660 encounter between the Lenape, an Indigenous people who inhabited the area that is now New York City, and Dutch settlers. Two Dutchmen, one carrying a firearm on his shoulder and the other recognized as Peter Stuyvesant, a colonial governor of what was then New Netherland, greet two Lenape men, one of which is now recognized as Oratamin, a leader, or sachem of the Munsee branch. The Lenape men, carrying offerings for the settlers, are dressed in red loincloths and headdresses of varying degrees of intricacy. In the background we see the settlers’ ships in the harbour as Lenape women walk towards the men in calf-length skirts, chests bare, with their heads bowed downwards.

For some, the scene might not raise any eyebrows, but it perpetuates inaccurate stereotypes of how the interaction would have actually gone and it diminishes the colonization that was in motion. For instance, on such an occasion, the Lenape would have would have worn symbols of leadership and fur robes as opposed to loincloths. Additionally, the women in the background would not have been subservient in Lenape culture, women did and still hold positions of power and leadership.

When the AMNH decided to take a serious look at how to resolve these issues, they contemplated how best to work with the diorama. ‘We could have just covered it over,’ said Lauri Halderman, vice president of the exhibition for the AMNH, to the New York Times. ‘What was actually more interesting was not to make it go away, but to acknowledge that it was problematic.’

In the end, the AMNH removed the glass protecting the model and added labels to highlight the inaccuracies in the dated diorama. Having taken most of 2018 and a sizable, undisclosed budget, the labels ask viewers to ‘reconsider the scene.’ The annotations only go so far, but the museum acknowledges that they haven’t pointed out every issue…mainly because the glass isn’t large enough to show them all. However, it makes those looking at the diorama realize that such works usually don’t tell the full story.

The ‘Old New York Diorama’ isn’t the only work at the AMNH that has gotten more attention recently. In fact, a statue of the person the diorama’s gallery is named for, Theodore Roosevelt, has been a point of contention as well. In recent months, the museum has asked the public to weigh in on the 1925 statue, which stands in front of the AMNH, that shows Roosevelt atop a horse flanked by a Native American man and an African man. While it is still undecided how the AMNH will address the statue, the diorama is one step made in the direction of highlighting problematic pasts.


Aaron Franklin’s Butcher Paper Brisket

SCF fans may remember our trip to Franklin Barbecue back in 2010. Well that little barbecue trailer has become the most popular barbecue restaurant in Austin, which is to say it is some of the most popular barbecue in the country.

Aaron Franklin, the owner (above, and you can see him working the ‘cue in those photos in the link above), grew up on barbecue at Martin’s in Bryan, Texas, and then moved to Austin to join a band. It didn’t go anywhere so he started cooking brisket. He got very good at cooking brisket, and then got a job at John Mueller’s Barbecue on Manor Road in Austin. That went out of business and he bought the smoker, got a trailer and opened a barbecue joint around the corner from Sarah and Wilson’s house. The brisket and the espresso sauce are like barbecue ambrosia.

How do I know all this? A very excellent new cookbook from Robb Walsh, a former food writer for the Houston Press and Austin Chronicle who has a new book out called Texas Eats. It’s as much a history of Texan food as it is a recipe book, but it is both, with stories from all regions of the great state and tales from its immigrants. I plan to read it like a novel, and I can’t recommend it enough. Head over to his site or Amazon or your local bookstore and buy yourself a copy.

After paging through and dog-earing half the book for recipes I’d like to make, I zeroed in on three recipes for Memorial Day weekend. The centerpiece of my cooking extravangza: Aaron Franklin’s Butcher Paper Brisket. Now those of you who’ve watched our barbecue exploits over the years (and those of you who have lived through the time when Greg thought he would barbecue for our wedding and all of its 150 guests) know that we’ve tried a lot of barbecue recipes.

We especially appreciate the technique shown to us by John Stage of Dinosaur BBQ (who eventually catered our wedding after Greg came to the conclusion that barbecuing for 150 on the day he was to be married was not a wise idea). John likes to smoke his ‘cue for a while, then wrap it in foil so it will still cook low and slow but won’t get a lot more smoke and git too smoky.

It seems to us that’s the point of Aaron Franklin’s recipe, as written by Robb Walsh. He smokes the brisket for 6 hours, then sprays it with some Worchestershire sauce mixed with water, then wraps it in butcher paper. The thing about butcher paper, we think, is that it lets in more smoke than the foil, but also lets the meat breathe a little better. People seem to agree with us. It also seems to protect the crispy edges of the ‘cue a little better than foil does.

Whatever the case, the recipe was an enormous hit. My advice, as with all barbecue, is to start really really early in the day. Or, if you can’t, do like we did and cook it the day before you plan to eat it. We lobbed off the last hour and a half of cooking that the recipe called for and instead used that time the next day to put the brisket in the oven at 200 for two hours before mealtime.

This recipe takes a very long time to make: 11 or 12 hours. But that’s what makes good barbecue. Low and slow. Have patience and you will be rewarded.

Aaron Franklin’s Butcher Paper Brisket

Aaron Franklin smokes his briskets with post oak or live oak, according to Robb Walsh. He also cooks them to the “unheard-of internal temperature of 201 to 203 F.” We cain’t git oak for smoking around here, so we used a combination of briquettes and hickory. Not exactly the same, I know, but the ‘cue came out mighty good. I’ll give you both recipes here, and should you be able to replicate Aaron’s exactly, by all means, try. Our instructions are in ital.

1 (8-10 pound) first-quality beef brisket, untrimmed
Salt and coarsely ground pepper
1/4 cup Worchestershire sauce
1/4 water

Sprinkle the brisket on both sides with salt and pepper. Combine the Worchestershire sauce and water in a mister.

Prepare a fire for indirect-heat cooking in your smoker (the coals on one side only) with a water pan. Use wood chips, chunks or logs and keep up a good level of smoke. The smoker is ready when the temperature is between 275 and 300.

Put the brisket in the smoker on the cool side of the grate and close the lid. Cook for 6 hours, adding wood as needed to keep the fire burning evenly. At this point, test the brisket with an instant-read thermometer the internal temperature should read 165.

What we did here was use an off-set smoker: Crumple one broadsheet newspaper page and place it under a chimney starter. Fill the chimney 3/4 full of Kingsford briquettes. Light the paper and wait 1/2 hour until the briquettes are glowing orange with grey ash around them. Set them in the smoker’s box. Place several large hunks of hickory on top.

The coals last between 1 to 1 1/2 hours, so you will need to repeat this process every hour. It takes 30 minutes for the coals to be ready (glowing orange with grey ash around them), and you need to always be ahead. Set your timer, and start the coals each hour. Wait until they are ready, then put them in the box, and place the hickory. Wait. Wait and watch. Watch the smoke coming out of the chimney watch the temperature. Barbecue is an art, not a science.

Remove the brisket from the smoker. Spray it with some of the Worchestershire solution (there will be a lot leftover), wrap it in butcher paper and return it to the smoker. Let it cook in the paper for 2 hours longer.

Remove the wrapped brisket from the smoker and place it in an empty cooler or a 200 degree oven for 3 or 4 hours. The brisket is done when a toothpick passes effortlessly through the fat or an instant-read thermometer inserted into the center registers at least 185 but preferably as high as 203.

Put it in the oven for 2 hours. Placed the butcher paper-wrapped brisket in a gallon freezer bag and put it in the downstairs fridge. (Our downstairs fridge only has beer and wine, so the hope is that the amazing smoky smell won’t infuse any other foods that might be in there. If you don’t have an extra fridge, you might want to do a double-wrap.) Three hours before dinner, remove the brisket from the fridge. Preheat the oven to 250. Let it sit out for an hour. Then reheat, wrapped in paper, on a sheet pan, for 2 hours, until the internal temperature reaches between 170 and 200.)

To ensure the brisket remains moist, do not trim away the fat cap before serving. Slice only as much brisket as needed and serve immediately. The remainder will keep well wrapped in the refrigerator for up to a week.


What’s Wrong With This Diorama? You Can Read All About It

On the first floor of the American Museum of Natural History, a diorama depicts an imagined 17th-century meeting between Dutch settlers and the Lenape, an Indigenous tribe inhabiting New Amsterdam, now New York City. It was intended to show a diplomatic negotiation between the two groups, but the portrayal tells a different story.

The scene takes place in what is now known as the Battery, with ships on the horizon. The tribesmen wear loincloths, and their heads are adorned with feathers. A few Lenape women can be seen in the background, undressed to the waist, in skirts that fall to midcalf. They keep their heads down, dutiful. In front of a windmill are two fully clothed Dutchmen, one of them resting a firearm on his shoulder. The other, Peter Stuyvesant, colonial governor of New Netherland, is graciously extending his hand, waiting to receive offerings brought by the Lenape.

Critics have said the diorama depicts cultural hierarchy, not a cultural exchange. Museum officials said they had been aware of these implications for a while, and now they have addressed them.

The narrative, created in 1939, is filled with historical inaccuracies and clichés of Native representation, said Bradley Pecore, a visual historian of Menominee and Stockbridge Munsee descent. “These stereotypes are problematic, and they’re still very powerful. They shape the American public’s understanding of Indigenous people.”

About a year ago, the museum asked Mr. Pecore to help solve the diorama problem. Should it be removed entirely? Could the protective glass be temporarily taken out, and what was behind it altered?

Lauri Halderman, the museum’s vice president for exhibition, said, “We could have just covered it over.” Instead, museum officials decided on a more transparent approach. “What was actually more interesting was not to make it go away,” Ms. Halderman continued, “but to acknowledge that it was problematic.”

The solution offers a lesson in the changing nature of history itself. And it’s written on the glass.

Image

While the scene remains intact, 10 large labels now adorn the glass, summarizing various issues. They were carefully chosen after a research process that took most of 2018. The largest one, visible from a distance, invites visitors to “reconsider this scene.”

The labels say, for instance, that if the scene had been historically accurate, the Lenape would have been dressed for the occasion in fur robes and adornments that signified leadership positions. Canoes would have been seen in the water next to the European ships. These were vital to colonial trade, providing access to items found further inland, where the larger ships could not navigate. The women did not wear impractical skirts. Further, some are likely to have been part of the negotiations, as women in Lenape societies (past and present) typically hold leadership roles. While only Stuyvesant was originally identified, the new labels also take note of Oratamin, a respected leader of the Hackensack, a Munsee branch of the Lenape. The list goes on, but it is not complete there’s only so much room on the glass.

“One thread that runs through this work is understanding who gets to tell the story in museums,” Ms. Halderman said.

Along with Ms. Halderman, Mr. Pecore worked on the project with the museum’s curator of North American ethnology, Peter Whiteley, who said the diorama’s problems came up early in his tenure, which began in 2001. Asked the cost of the project, a museum representative estimated the amount at “tens of thousands of dollars,” but officials did not provide a precise figure.

The diorama is one of four in the Theodore Roosevelt Memorial Hall, unveiled shortly after the president’s death in 1919. The others honor the president’s life and conservation efforts. The New Amsterdam scene was meant to honor his Dutch ancestry, although Mr. Roosevelt was not a direct descendant of Stuyvesant himself. Mr. Pecore said the presence of Indigenous people in this display signifies their role in history. “You can only be so American without Native Americans,” he said. “For me, that’s the reason it’s in the Roosevelt memorial.”

A new panel placed on the wall near the diorama addresses an often-overlooked question: Where are the Lenape now?

Before the arrival of the Dutch, around 30,000 Lenape lived in their homeland, territory that is now the northeastern United States. Forced to move repeatedly over several generations, the roughly 16,000 remaining tribe members now live across Canada and in Kansas, Oklahoma and Wisconsin. The panel shows a map with arrows starting in the regions they had to leave, and pointing to their new locations.

It was important to Mr. Pecore that the exhibition signal the continuing effects of colonization, as well as correct the stereotypical representations. “I’ve walked through different museums, and when you see Native people, they’re in the corner playing with stones. We never arrive to be fully modern humans.”

The changes come after three years of protests by members of Decolonize This Place, a movement urging institutions to acknowledge the struggles of Indigenous peoples, and other groups asking the museum to change demeaning displays.

“There’s no question that the controversies around the memorial quickened our attention,” said Lisa Gugenheim, a senior vice president for strategic planning at the museum.

Among the group’s requests was the removal of the statue in front of the museum showing Roosevelt on his horse, and the formation of an independent commission that would assess cultural representations across the museum.

Reassessing representations is, in part, the purpose of a current $14.5 million reconstruction of the Northwest Coast Hall, set to reopen next year. Showcasing Indigenous artifacts collected on an expedition, the gallery presented them as belonging to cultures stuck in time, immune to historical change. The updated exhibition will include contemporary practices and the lives of present-day descendants, and will contextualize the artifacts presented.

One of the best-known artifacts from the collection is what the museum calls the Great Canoe, displayed right outside the exhibit.

Ms. Gugenheim said that amending the Stuyvesant diorama, as opposed to removing it, created the opportunity for dialogue. “We’re revealing the making of the cake and not just the end of the process,” she said. “We’re inviting visitors to imagine themselves, why did we feel the need to update it? And of course that applies to teachers and kids, too.”

Alan Czemerinski was visiting recently when he spotted the labels from across the hall, and spent a few minutes reading them. “I probably would have walked by it otherwise,” he said. “It’s important to look back at historical representations and see what’s wrong.”

Another visitor, Alana Steinberg, said her experience was enhanced this way. “It’s interesting,” she said, “to see how cultural knowledge has changed over time.”


What's wrong with this diorama? You can read all about it

NEW YORK — On the first floor of the American Museum of Natural History, a diorama depicts an imagined 17th-century meeting between Dutch settlers and the Lenape, an indigenous tribe inhabiting New Amsterdam, now New York City.

It was intended to show a diplomatic negotiation between the two groups, but the portrayal tells a different story.

The scene takes place in what is now known as the Battery, with ships on the horizon. The tribesmen wear loincloths, and their heads are adorned with feathers. A few Lenape women can be seen in the background, undressed to the waist, in skirts that brush the ground. They keep their heads down, dutiful. In front of a windmill are two fully clothed Dutchmen, one of them resting a rifle on his shoulder. The other, Peter Stuyvesant, colonial governor of New Netherland, is graciously extending his hand, waiting to receive offerings brought by the Lenape.

Critics have said the diorama depicts cultural hierarchy, not a cultural exchange. Museum officials said they had been aware of these implications for a while, and now they have addressed them.

The narrative, created in 1939, is filled with historical inaccuracies and clichés of Native representation, said Bradley Pecore, a visual historian of Menominee and Stockbridge Munsee descent. “These stereotypes are problematic, and they’re still very powerful. They shape the American public’s understanding of indigenous people.”

About a year ago, the museum asked Pecore to help solve the diorama problem. Should it be removed entirely? Could the protective glass be temporarily taken out, and what was behind it altered?

Lauri Halderman, the museum’s vice president for exhibition, said, “We could have just covered it over.” Instead, museum officials decided on a more transparent approach. “What was actually more interesting was not to make it go away,” Halderman said, “but to acknowledge that it was problematic.”

The solution offers a lesson in the changing nature of history itself. And it’s written on the glass.

While the scene remains intact, 10 large labels now adorn the glass, summarizing various issues. They were carefully chosen after a research process that took most of 2018. The largest one, visible from a distance, invites visitors to reconsider the scene.

The labels say, for instance, that if the scene had been historically accurate, the Lenape would have been dressed for the occasion in fur robes and adornments that signified leadership positions. Canoes would have been seen in the water next to the European ships. These were vital to colonial trade, providing access to items found further inland, where the larger ships could not navigate. The women did not wear impractical skirts that dragged behind them. Further, some are likely to have been part of the negotiations, as women in Lenape societies (past and present) typically hold leadership roles. While only Stuyvesant was originally identified, the new labels also take note of Oratamin, a respected leader of the Hackensack, a Munsee branch of the Lenape. The list goes on, but it is not complete there’s only so much room on the glass.

“One thread that runs through this work is understanding who gets to tell the story in museums,” Halderman said.

Along with Halderman, Pecore worked on the project with the museum’s curator of North American ethnology, Peter Whiteley, who said the diorama’s problems came up early in his tenure, which began in 2001. Asked about the cost of the project, a museum representative estimated the amount at “tens of thousands of dollars,” but officials did not provide a precise figure.

The diorama is one of four in the Theodore Roosevelt Memorial Hall, unveiled shortly after the death of former President Theodore Roosevelt in 1919. The others honor his life and conservation efforts. The New Amsterdam scene was meant to honor his Dutch ancestry, although Roosevelt was not a direct descendant of Stuyvesant. Pecore said the presence of indigenous people in this display signified their role in history. “You can only be so American without Native Americans,” he said. “For me, that’s the reason it’s in the Roosevelt memorial.”

A new panel placed on the wall near the diorama addresses an often-overlooked question: Where are the Lenape now?

Before the arrival of the Dutch, about 30,000 Lenape lived in their homeland, territory that is now the northeastern United States. Forced to move repeatedly over several generations, the roughly 16,000 remaining tribe members now live across Canada and in Kansas, Oklahoma and Wisconsin. The panel shows a map with arrows starting in the regions they had to leave and pointing to their new locations.

It was important to Pecore that the exhibition signal the continuing effects of colonization, as well as correct the stereotypical representations. “I’ve walked through different museums, and when you see Native people, they’re in the corner playing with stones. We never arrive to be fully modern humans.”

The changes come after three years of protests by members of Decolonize This Place, a movement urging institutions to acknowledge the struggles of indigenous peoples, and other groups asking the museum to change demeaning displays.

“There’s no question that the controversies around the memorial quickened our attention,” said Lisa Gugenheim, a senior vice president for strategic planning at the museum.

Among the group’s requests was the removal of the statue in front of the museum showing Roosevelt on his horse and the formation of an independent commission that would assess cultural representations across the museum.

Reassessing representations is, in part, the purpose of a current $14.5 million reconstruction of the Northwest Coast Hall, set to reopen next year. Showcasing indigenous artifacts collected on an expedition, the gallery presented them as belonging to cultures stuck in time, immune to historical change. The updated exhibition will include contemporary practices and the lives of present-day descendants and will contextualize the artifacts presented.

One of the best-known artifacts from the collection is what the museum calls the Great Canoe, displayed right outside the exhibit.

Gugenheim said amending the Stuyvesant diorama, as opposed to removing it, created the opportunity for dialogue. “We’re revealing the making of the cake and not just the end of the process,” she said. “We’re inviting visitors to imagine themselves, why did we feel the need to update it? And of course that applies to teachers and kids, too.”

Alan Czemerinski was visiting recently when he spotted the labels from across the hall and spent a few minutes reading them. “I probably would have walked by it otherwise,” he said. “It’s important to look back at historical representations and see what’s wrong.”

Another visitor, Alana Steinberg, said her experience was enhanced this way. “It’s interesting,” she said, “to see how cultural knowledge has changed over time.”


Oratamin YTB-347 - History


JUST ANNOUNCED!
Join Coach and Scott
Saturday Night at Funshine
in Orlando!
Saturday, Sept. 26, 7-9 pm

YTBI Founder J. Kim Sorensen

Kansas City Area
Super Saturday Training Event
Saturday, September 19
9:00 am - 1:00 pm
(Registration begins 8:30 am)


Directors PJ Jensen, Deb and Phil Brasel, Julie Vest, Kriss Hansen

Offering outstanding training are Directors Peter "PJ" Jensen,
Deb and Phil Brasel, Julie Vest, Kriss Hansen, along with
Coach's Corner members Doc Filberth, Brett Wren,
Dan and Sigi Hill, and Van and Mia Torian

Announcing YTB's All New
RPM Training Program

Ladies and Gentlemen: Start your engines!

YTB is proud to announce the launch of our new training program for Reps and Associates - Regional Product Marketing (RPM) Training!

Coming soon to Orlando, Florida and San Francisco and Irvine, California.
(Please see schedule below)

RPM Training Classes will be taught by Certified Trainers, bringing to our Reps and Associates the most updated, relevant information. The curriculum includes a complete study of all YTB products, how to sell them, how to build your YTB marketing business and much more.

The registration fee for RPM is $45 per person and is open to all Reps and Associates. This training-intensive meeting is not appropriate for guests.

To register for any of the RPM Training Classes, please call 618-655-9477, option 2 during regular Home Office hours: Monday through Friday, 7:00 am - 7:00 pm Central time. The only way to attend is to pre-register. Registration is now live for the first three RPM Training Classes.

RPM TRAINING CLASS SCHEDULE

Sunday, September 27, 2009

Gaylord Palms
6000 West Osceola Parkway, Orlando, Florida 34746
Time: 1:00 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. Eastern Time
To book hotel room: 877-784-6835

Saturday, October 3, 2009

Hyatt Regency Irvine
17900 Jamboree Blvd, Irvine, California 92614
Time: 8:00 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Pacific Time
To book hotel room: 949-975-1234

Sunday, October 4, 2009

Hyatt Regency Burlingame
1333 Bayshore Highway, San Francisco, California 94010
Time: 1:00 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. Pacific Time
To book hotel room: 650-347-1234

ONE TEAM ONE DREAM
YTB 2.0 TOUR
Ft. Lauderdale, FL Area
Saturday, September 19
9:00 am (see schedule)


Jerome Hughes, Roland Athouris, Demond Crump

Hear from Directors Jerome Hughes, Roland Athouris, Aisle 19 President Mr. Travis Baggett, and MVP of TeamVision Demond Crump . Just added: Director Fabian Martinez!

9:00 am - 10:00 am YTB OPPORTUNITY PRESENTATION IN (SPANISH)
10:00 am - 11:00 am President of Aisle 19 Travis Baggett Presentation & Training in Spanish
11:00 am - 12:00 noon YTB OPPORTUNITY PRESENTATION IN (ENGLISH)
12:00 noon - 1:00 pm Break
1:00 pm - 2:30 pm YTB Training
2:30 pm - 4:30 pm President of Aisle 19 Travis Baggett Presentation & Training
4:30 pm - 5:00 pm Q & A

Tickets are on sale now! Click here! This event will sell out!
$15.00 in advance/$20.00 at the door. Guests are FREE!
For more information, please contact
Coach's Corner Member Alex Council at (561) 827-8584


Cypress Creek Sheraton Hotel & Suites
555 N.W. 62nd
Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33309

SECOND ANNUAL RECESSION PROOF YOUR INCOME WORKSHOP

Orlando, Florida Area
Thursday, September 24, 2009
7:00 pm (doors open 6:00 pm)


Key Speakers: Directors James Prewitt and Craig Sweet
Come learn how to Recession-Proof Your Income
through the power of Internet E-commerce at our
2nd Annual Recession-Proof Your Income Workshop!

First Brazilian Baptist Church of Orlando (PIBBO)
4364 West 35th Street, Orlando, FL 32811
Doors open 6:00 pm
Dinner will be provided from 6:00pm to 6:45pm
Cost: $10 per person. Guests are free.

Purchase your tickets in advance.
Call Gillian Wilson at (917) 804-6559
Bring guests to help build your business!

Conference Calls are a great way to build your business!

Travel Site Owner Opportunity Call Monday-Thursday 9:00 pm ET
Three-way a guest on to the call and watch your sales explode!
641-594-7578 Pin 180621#

Grow Your Business!
ATTEND THE NEXT
RED CARPET DAY
Tuesday, October 27, 2009

Chicago Meeting Recap
September 9, 2009

Founders and Directors present at the September 9 event at the Ramada Lake Shore in Chicago were YTBI Founders Scott Tomer and Lauri Tomer, YTB Circle of Champions Donald Bradley, Director Phyllis Nash and Director Jil Greene. The event was also hosted by Dream Bonus Earners David and Sharron Gilty

"Over 200 attendees were present at this meeting and it appeared to be a new momentum that revived many of Reps. Everyone is looking for something and Scott Tomer's YTB 2.0 presentation gave everyone a belief system on how this business can benefit their families." - David Gilty, YTB Dream Bonus Earner

"Fantastic! Inspirational! Motivational! Energetic!" - Stephanie Carter-Logan, PowerTeam Leader, Multiple Leadership Bonus Earner

Special thanks to Shavone Brooks, Montez Holmes, Stephanie Carter-Logan, Leslie and Stephanie Lee, Kelly Butler, Danielle Lee, and the entire TEAM GILTY Family!

"The South will rise again!" South Carolina that is. This was the battle cry as YTB MVP Director Donald Bradley, along with other YTB Directors, hosted a main event in Columbia, SC last Monday night, September 14th.


Bradley set the stage before this excited group
of Reps and guests as he challenged the crowd to take control of their own business for their families and for the future.

The highlight of the evening was when YTB CEO Scott Tomer and Lauri Tomer took center stage. Scott shared with the crowd the history of YTB, where we are today, and where we are going in the future.

The apex of the night was when YTB field leaders participated in an informal round table discussion and engaged in some- one-on-one with Scott Tomer. The night was completed with a photo session.


North Carolina Reps visiting the Columbia, SC event pose for a photo with Scott and Lauri Tomer.


Buffy St. Marie’s Book for Kids Shows Her Love for Animals

“Singer-songwriter Buffy Sainte-Marie’s long career includes an expansive catalogue of music, art and work in activism. And now she can add children’s book author to that list, with the publication of Hey Little Rockabye .” CBC Radio

Excerpt:Buffy Sainte-Marie’s loveof Animals Shines through her first Picture Book for Kids CBC Radio

“Featuring illustrations by Ben Hodson, Hey Little Rockabye conveys an important message about finding love and acceptance: a young girl rescues a little dog and tries to convince her parents to let her keep him.

An accompanying song was released and the book features sheet music for readers to sing along…

Hey Little Rockabye is about the many wonderful pets who need a forever home. We’re hoping that people will consider adopting a little Rockabye of their own through shelters. There are all kinds of reasons why a pet may need a home… Over the years, I came to be not only a dog people but a cat people. So I’m both. Cats and dogs are very different. Most people who start out with dogs they think that a cat is going to speak the same language as a dog. But you can’t train cats, you just have to learn a different language…’As a little girl, I had rabbits. There was a dog and there was a cat that everybody ignored. When I was a little girl I wanted to be a zookeeper — and would envision that would get me close to animals!’

“I’m always longing for a pet. When I’m on the road —I like to go down to the local shelter or the local pet stores where they have pets out for adoption. I like to go in to socialize with the animals who are there…It’s a major commitment and I’m so proud that people are finding forever homes for these animals.”

Indian Country Today:

Resource Sites for the COVID-19:

Are you a Native student whose college or university has been closed or switched to online classes? Visit this spreadsheet for resources involving technology in Native communities. It is updated by San Juan College’s Native American Center.

• Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Basic information.

“I’ve said from the outset of this election that we are in a battle for the soul of this nation. Who we are. What we believe. And maybe most important — who we want to be. It’s all at stake.”

Democratic Presidential Leader Joe Biden

STAY SMART — STAY STRONG — STAY SAFE!


State of the artisan

Along with its tech, the E-Class tradition of craftsmanship advances as well. Upholstery is hand-fitted to heated front seats. Choose from five woods at no charge. Options range from acoustic glass to a giant sunroof.

PERFORMANCE

The measure of an E-Class is still how it moves, and the way it moves you. Agile and athletic, it's engineered and tuned to evoke your confidence and inspire your joy on city streets, open highways, and the road to the future.

Driving forces unite

Standard on the E 450 and an E 350 option, 4MATIC® all-wheel drive adds confidence in challenging conditions. Selective damping or available AIR BODY CONTROL® each respond to sharpen handling and smooth the ride.

Progress accelerates

The 255-hp turbo E 350 squeezes more power from less fuel, self-tuning every few milliseconds. The E 450's 362-hp turbo inline-6 is electrified with EQ Boost technology, for added gas-free response and responsibility.

Tuning you can tune in

DYNAMIC SELECT dials in performance with the tap of a console button. The 9-speed transmission, throttle and more sharpen in Sport mode, ease up in ECO. There's even a mode you can set up as you like.

First Look


Type V ship

The Type V ship is a United States Maritime Commission (MARCOM) designation for World War II tugboats. Type V was used in World War II, Korean War and the Vietnam War. Type V ships were used to move ships and barges. Type V tugboats were made of either steel or wood hulls. There were four types of tugboats ordered for World War II. The largest type V design was the sea worthy 186-foot (57 m) long steel hull, V4-M-A1. The V4-M-A1 design was used by a number of manufacturers a total of 49 were built. A smaller steel hull tugboat was the 94-foot (29 m) V2-ME-A1 26 were built. The largest wooden hull was the 148-foot (45 m) V3-S-AH2, of which 14 were built. The smaller wooden hull was the 58-foot (18 m) V2-M-AL1, which 35 were built. Most V2-M-AL1 tugboats were sent to England for the war efforts under the lend-lease act. The Type V tugs served across the globe during Work War II including: Pacific War, European theatre and in the United States. SS Farallon and other Type V tugs were used to help built Normandy ports, including Mulberry harbour, on D-Day, June 6, 1944 and made nine round trips to Normandy to deliver Phoenix breakwaters. [1] [2]

Tugboats are used to maneuver vessels and barges by pushing or towing them. Tugs are needed to move vessels that either should not move by themselves, such as large ships in a crowded harbor or a narrow canal, or those that can not move by themselves, like as barges, disabled ships, or log rafts. [3] Tugboats are powerful for their small size and are strongly built. Early tugboats used steam engines, but most have diesel engines now. Many tugboats have firefighting water cannons, allowing them to assist in firefighting, especially in harbors. Some minesweepers like USS Vireo, USS Lark and USS Kingfisher were converted to ocean tugs for the war.


8 years of ink

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Thanks to Dave Zornow for investing over a decade of his life to build NyackNewsAndViews.com. Few communities have a daily digital platform for thoughtful, curated local content.

I thank the Nyack Chamber of Commerce for helping me find work that accommodates all of my art forms.

And most importantly I thank the love on my life Marisol Diaz, for sharing and shaping a household that accommodates tons of content and constant deadlines.

Special thanks to my sponsors during these eight years: Hal Parker, owner of The Corner Frame Shop, Lisa Hayes, founder of Creative Financial Planning and Sabrina Weld, of Weld Realty. Weld has been with me for the last six years. Without their support, I would not have been able to stay the course.

And to everyone who has read a word, seen a sketch, or bought a card, book, t-shirt, mug, or hat, thank you for your time, attention, consideration and patronage.

As a guide to how I view this collection of sketches and short essays, I have selected one favorite per year. I’d be curious to know which are your favorites.

My Eight Favorites from Eight Years of Ink

This house and this street are the remnants of Nyack’s oldest middle class black neighborhood. In the early twentieth century, when Edward Hopper was a teenager, a group of African American families bought homes in Nyack. Homeownership by blacks in Nyack was a stunning achievement when you consider the fact that merely fifty years earlier blacks owned nothing: blacks were owned.

In 1884, Nyack, NY was a bustling river community and the commercial heart of Rockland County. This sketch is from a widely circulated map made by L. R. Burleigh. The bird’s-eye view rendering depicts a jumble of homes, businesses and churches. When you take a closer look at this historical document you’ll discover that our 19th century republic on the Hudson was not as indivisible as the promise made in our pledge of allegiance.

Pierre Bernard, America’s first yogi, lived on an ashram he called the Clarkstown Country Club in Nyack from 1920 until his death in 1955. The complex of buildings is now the campus of Nyack College. Equal parts Harry Houdini and Howard Hughes, Bernard achieved degrees of success as a yogi, animal trainer, baseball manager, and aviation expert. But millions knew him by his dubious tabloid title, Oom the Omnipotent.

When printmaker Sylvia Roth moved into her home in South Nyack in 1977, she had no idea it was the birthplace of a major figure in American art, Joseph Cornell. This house on Piermont Avenue seems to have its own designs, selecting artistic occupants for over a century.

After operating under the ownership of an O’Donoghue for 63 of the last 65 years, the pub near the corner of Main Street and Broadway in Nyack served their last call on April 23. There has been an O’Donoghue behind the bar since 1949, when Paul O’Donoghue Sr. started working as a night barman for what was then called Charlie’s Bar & Grill.

O’D’s reopened under new management and is thriving and continuing the legacy of music, food and libation.

Before we had a skatepark, Nyack was home to one of the first skateboard teams in New York, The Wizards. Acclaimed photographer Charlie Samuels is launching an Indiegogo campaign to complete his documentary that will feature the Wizards and the Village of Nyack called Virgin Blacktop. There will be a fundraising party tonight, Tuesday, March 15 at Nyack’s Pour House, 102 Main Street from 6-9p to launch the online fundraising effort.

The intersection of Midland Avenue and Main Street has become a reliable incubator for new family-run restaurants in Nyack. Once the home of Maura’s Kitchen, that recently moved to South Broadway, the crossroads now boasts Cuñao, a taqueria and across the street Karenderya, which was launched this month by Paolo Mendoza and Cheryl Baun.

While the name of Nyack’s only record shop has changed, the staff, stylings and singer/songwriter owners remain the same. Amy Bezunartea and Jennifer O’Connor announced this weekend that their store will no longer share the name of their record label, Kiam. Main Street Beat is now emblazoned on the door where music fans can find new releases from the indy label, previously owned classic vinyl records and an eclectic offering of books and clothing, curated by Amy.

I have to chose my words very carefully, because of the extremely litigious history of this topic. Simply put, because I am Billy Batson, I am Shazam.


Watch the video: SABATON - Defence Of Moscow Official Music Video (June 2022).


Comments:

  1. Sashicage

    Excuse for that I interfere... here recently. But this theme is very close to me. I can help with the answer.

  2. Kagam

    Great idea, I maintain.

  3. Jameson

    It is strange to see that people remain indifferent to the problem. Perhaps this is due to the global economic crisis. Although, of course, it's hard to say unequivocally. I myself thought for a few minutes before writing these few words. Who is to blame and what to do is our eternal problem, to my mind Dostoevsky spoke about this.

  4. Sloan

    This theme is simply incomparable



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