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Jane Archer

Jane Archer


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Jane Archer was born Kathleen Jane Sissmore in 1898. She was educated at Princess Helen's College in Ealing. She became head girl and her headmistress described her as "a strong character, very straight, well principled, industrious".

In 1916 she was recruited as a clerk at MI5. In her spare time she trained as a barrister. She gained first class examination results and was called to the Bar in 1924. She rose rapidly through the ranks and was eventually appointed as MI5's first woman officer. In 1929 she became for overseeing Soviet and Communist operations in the United Kingdom. In 1937 she employed Roger Hollis as her assistant.

Jane Sissmore married Wing Commander John Archer on 2nd September, 1939. Walter Krivitsky, a former NKVD agent, escaped to the United States. In January 1940 he was brought to London and interviewed by Jane Archer. Krivitsky told her that the idea was "to grow up agents from the inside". Krivitsky added: "This method had a great disadvantage in that results might not be obtained for a number of years, but it was regularly used by Soviet Intelligence Services abroad. Krivitsky mentioned that the Fourth Department was prepared in some instances to wait for ten or fifteen years for results and in some cases paid the expenses of a university education for promising young men in the hope that they might eventually obtain diplomatic posts or other key positions in the service of the country of which they were nationals."

Krivitsky told Archer about the Soviet spy who was a "a Scotsman of good family, educated at Eton and Oxford, and an idealist who worked for the Russians without payment" from a "very good family". He added that he believed Theodore Maly and Arnold Deutsch ran the source. However, both men had returned to the Soviet Union. Krivitsky claimed that the agent who worked in the Foreign Office was "ideological". Verne W. Newton, the author of Cambridge Spies: Untold Story of Maclean, Philby and Burgess in America (1991), has argued that only six to eight university graduates passed the Foreign Office entrance exam each year and that it should have been possible for MI5 to discover the name of the agent, Donald Maclean.

Krivitsky also pointed out that Theodore Maly also ran a young English aristocrat, who was a journalist who had working for a British newspaper during the Spanish Civil War. This man was a friend of the agent in the Foreign Office. Maly apparently sent this agent to Spain with the orders to assassinate General Francisco Franco. Some experts such as Gary Kern have argued that the information given by Krivitsky should have led to the arrest of Maclean's friend, Kim Philby.

Christopher Andrew, the author of The Defence of the Realm: The Authorized History of MI5 (2009) has defended Archer's reputation. "Her interrogation of the Russian defector Walter Krivitsky, early in 1940, was a model of its kind the first really professional debriefing of a Soviet intelligence officer on either side of the Atlantic. In November 1940, however, she was sacked after denouncing the incompetence of Kell's successor as director, Jasper Harker."

Although Guy Liddell believed that Archer "had unfortunately gone too far" Oswald Harker was to blame because "but for his incompetence, the situation would never have arisen, and he had, moreover, over a period of many years, encouraged frank criticism from Jane Archer."

Wing Commander John Archer was killed on 27th September, 1943.

There was no wartime expansion, however, in the number of female MI5 officers. At the outbreak of war, the Security Service had only one such officer: Jane Archer (nee Sissmore), its main Soviet expert, who married the Service's RAF liason officer, Wing Commander John "Joe" Archer, during the lunch-hour on the day before war was declared. Her interrogation of the Russian defector Walter Krivitsky, early in 1940, was a model of its kind the first really professional debriefing of a Soviet intelligence officer on either side of the Atlantic. In November 1940, however, she was sacked after denouncing the incompetence of Kell's successor as director, Jasper Harker.


Jane (Kilgore) Archer (1772 - 1844)

Jane Kilogore was born 4 April 1772 in Cumberland, Pennsylvania.

From unsourced newspaper clipping which was originally found in the Clark County Genealogy Library, Marshall, Illinois:

"At the close of his military service he (Zachariah Archer) moved to Scott County, Ky and married Miss Jane Kilgore on Wednesday, November 15, 1789. At the time of their marriage he was thirty-seven and she was seventeen years of age."

"The family moved from Kentucky to Ohio and purchased a farm near Ridgeville in Warren County in the year 1801. "

The mother and two sons travelled overland driving a number of cattle. The rest of the family travelled by river and were alarmingly delayed but eventually reached their destination in Illinois.

"Jane Kilgore, the daughter of Charles and Jane Kilgore and the wife of Zachariah Archer was born in Cumberland County, Penn. on Saturday, April 4th, 1772, the same day that her husband Zachariah, landed in this country. At the age of 69 years, or 19 years after the death of her husband Zachariah Archer she applied to the government for a widow's pension. She died at the residence of her daughter Mrs. Jane Bartlett on Saturday, December 14, 1844.


The good, the bad and the finicky

Sheldon also wrote the paragraph below:

In any case, the quality of Taiwanese production from SunRace/Sturmey-Archer so far has been excellent, generally better than the quality of later English production. Sturmey-Archer's selection of multi-speed hubs is much wider than that of the other manufacturers. Some folks don't believe that the Taiwanese can make stuff as well as the British did, but there's no factual basis for that belief, and in many cases this attitude may be traced to racism.

I find that Taiwan-made bicycles and bicycle components are generally of good quality, but, as Sheldon's observations about earlier English production make clear, problems with Sturmey-Archer hubs are nothing new. Problems have occurred with Shimano and SRAM hubs as well. So, it is not shocking to discover that problems have occurred with Sturmey-Archer in Taiwan. The problems occur due to marketing-driven design issues which are described in more detail in the Trends section of our article on internal-gear hub theory. Sheldon didn't live long enough to see these problems play out with Sturmey-Archer under SunRace management.

The problems are least with three-speed hubs. Generally speaking, their designs have been stable, and replacement parts are available either from Sturmey-Archer, or for the classic AW three-speed, from aftermarket suppliers including Harris Cyclery, or a conscientious pack-rat bike shop mechanic or trash picker. SJS Cycles and Oldbiketrader in the UK maintain stocks of discontinued Sturmey-Archer hubs and parts and Aaron's Bicycle Repair in Seattle, Washington, USA has old and new parts. Complete parts lists and rebuilding information on hubs from the original 1902 model up through the year 2000 is available at the Sturmey-Archer Heritage Web site. Sheldonbrown.com has information on the hubs you are at all likely to see, and some rare ones.

A knowledgeable mechanic writes the following:

On the plus side, the current range of hubs has never been any larger than it is now. The traditional virtues of the brake hubs are still present, and if I were to choose a set of wheels for a robust city bike right now, they would probably have SA hubs in them. The brake hubs are (unlike Shimano Rollerbrakes) drag-free and the IGH's do at least coast well. Despite being ancient beyond belief, and vulnerable to knocks if not protected, the toggle chain is still the simplest and best method of controlling a 3-speed hub IMHO.

The no-intermediate-gear 3-speed and 5-speed hubs have a 'pawl actuator plate' fitted which is a common source of trouble. The plate either breaks up or comes detached from the driver it sits on. If you backpedal when shifting, this failure happens more quickly. If you wheel the bike backwards with your foot on the pedal slightly, I think you can damage the hub instantly. The part itself is not expensive but the consequences of failure can be.

The no-intermediate-gear hubs all have design features that create more drag when pedaling than necessary, in a similar way to the drag spring in a coaster brake. Probably these are no worse than running a good hub generator when the lights are off this wouldn't be so bad if it were unavoidable, but it isn't, certainly not at a design stage. In some cases, it is possible to mitigate these losses with simple modifications, but in other cases it isn't.

The situation isn't as rosy with the five-speeds and eight-speeds. Sturmey-Archer has offered one series of these, then another since the move to Taiwan. It's too early to pass judgment on the newest hubs. There have been numerous reports of failures of the earlier versions. The Sturmey-Archer Web site no longer carries parts lists for them. -- though, again, parts are often available through aftermarket suppliers. The mechanic also comments:

The [previous version] (W) 5-speed hubs are not well designed the planet pinion bushings are wholly inadequate, the dog locking is not strong enough (esp if the hub slips. ), and the slot in the axle weakens it considerably.

If you buy a new (W) 5-speed hub and matching SL-50 shifter, you can expect trouble. Well before the hub wears normally, the gears will slip (on downshifts especially) because the shifter itself is too draggy and does not return to its detent positions correctly. It doesn't help that the instructions for shifting the hub are not accurate, either.

Brake hubs are currently supplied with cables for flat bars that have a nipple at both ends, but there is no lubrication on the cable. The brake action is draggy from day one when fitted with these cables. Most good Dutch manufacturers appear to use different cables.

The hub-brake shoes appear no longer to be readily available as spare parts SA expect you to buy a whole new brake plate instead. The brakes themselves can take a year or so (of daily use) before they are bedded in properly, and then (because the brake mechanism isn't allowed to 'float' properly) the braking performance isn't as powerful as it could be. A very simple modification can improve the power of these brakes considerably.

If the above sounds like a condemnation of SA in particular, it isn't meant to be. I could similarly list design and manufacturing flaws from other IGH makers. The frustrating thing is that SA could so easily do better than this. Right now they are in a price war with SRAM (now also manufactured in Taiwan) for the original-equipment-market bread-and-butter stuff. This does not bode well for quality.


Archer History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

The ancestors of the Archer family brought their name to England in the wave of migration after the Norman Conquest of 1066. The name Archer is for a bowman, and derives from the French L'Archer of the same meaning.

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Early Origins of the Archer family

The surname Archer was first found in Warwickshire, where "Fulbert L'Archer, the patriarch of the Lords Archer of Umberslade, in the county of Warwick, appears among the warriors at Hastings, who received recompense from the victor. His son, Robert L'Archer, obtained additions to his territorial possessions by grant from Henry I., whose tutor he had been, and still further increased his patrimony by marrying Sebit, daughter of Henry of Villiers, and thus acquiring the lands of Umberslade." [1]

However, another noted source claims Hampshire was the founding place for the family. "Willelmus Arcarius" held a barony in the hundred of Sunburne, in Hampshire. [2] This family took its name from the office it held under the Dukes of Normandy before the Conquest. Its derivation is rather uncertain, but a family of L'Archer, still flourishing in Brittany, bears the same three arrows that were borne by the English Archers, differenced in tincture. The latter claim as their ancestor Fulbert l'Archer, the father of Robert, to whom the Conqueror entrusted the charge of his son, afterwards Henry I. " [3]

Robert Larchier was listed in the Pipe Rolls of Hampshire and Warwickshire in 1166. Hugh le Archer was listed in the Feet of Fines of Cheshire in 1199. [4]

Odo le Archer was listed in Devon during the reign of Henry III and John le Archer was listed in Yorkshire in the reign of Edward I. The Hundredorum Rolls of 1237 list Thomas le Archer in Derbyshire. [5]

Some of the family were found to the far south in the parish of St. Ewe in Cornwall. "There was formerly a manor called Trelewick, but this has many years since been totally dismembered. The barton house was for some time the seat of John Archer, Esq. who died in 1733, to which family the estate belonged. Soon after this gentleman's death the house fell to decay, and remained for many years without an inhabitant. About twenty three years since the fee of Trelewick was sold by Addis Archer, Esq. to the late Mr. John Harris, by whom the dilapidated mansion was taken down, and a genteel farm house erected in its stead." [6]

"There are two gentlemen's seats in the parish of [Lewannick, Cornwall], both of which are ancient Trewanta Hall, the residence of William Hocken, Esq. and Treliske or Trelaske, the property and abode of Samuel Archer, Esq." [6]


What Archer family records will you find?

There are 427,000 census records available for the last name Archer. Like a window into their day-to-day life, Archer census records can tell you where and how your ancestors worked, their level of education, veteran status, and more.

There are 45,000 immigration records available for the last name Archer. Passenger lists are your ticket to knowing when your ancestors arrived in the USA, and how they made the journey - from the ship name to ports of arrival and departure.

There are 49,000 military records available for the last name Archer. For the veterans among your Archer ancestors, military collections provide insights into where and when they served, and even physical descriptions.

There are 427,000 census records available for the last name Archer. Like a window into their day-to-day life, Archer census records can tell you where and how your ancestors worked, their level of education, veteran status, and more.

There are 45,000 immigration records available for the last name Archer. Passenger lists are your ticket to knowing when your ancestors arrived in the USA, and how they made the journey - from the ship name to ports of arrival and departure.

There are 49,000 military records available for the last name Archer. For the veterans among your Archer ancestors, military collections provide insights into where and when they served, and even physical descriptions.


Out of the West

Jane Archer is the bestselling author of eight historical romances. Her Zebra titles include Rebel Seduction, Captive Desire, Captive Dreams, and Hidden Passions. A frequent speaker at writers&apos conferences across the country, she is a former advertising art director with a degree in graphic design. A native Texan, she makes her home in the Dallas area, although she enjoys travel and has lived in m Jane Archer is the bestselling author of eight historical romances. Her Zebra titles include Rebel Seduction, Captive Desire, Captive Dreams, and Hidden Passions. A frequent speaker at writers' conferences across the country, she is a former advertising art director with a degree in graphic design. A native Texan, she makes her home in the Dallas area, although she enjoys travel and has lived in many parts of the United States. Currently at work on another novel, she looks forward to the release of her next historical romance from Zebra in the summer of 1991.

- from the back cover of "Rebel Seduction" 1990 edition . more


Jane Archer - History

He was married three times. His first wife's surname was Tomasin and by 1637 had married his second wife, Ann. In about 1645 he married Katherine Banks in Henrico County VA. Katherine was born in Northamptonshire, England in 1627, daughter of Christopher Banks. Katherine's second husband was Henry Isham, Sr. She died December 1, 1686 in Henrico County, VA. Katherine Banks Royall Isham was great-great-great grandmoter to Thomas Jefferson, 3rd President of the United States.

In 1637 Joseph Royall, Sr., received 300 acres of land in Henrico County, Virginia on the south-east side of Turkey Island Creek for transporting colonists to America. According to the record, he was "due 50 acres for his own personal adventure, 50 acres for the transportation of his first wife Thomasin, 50 acres for the transportation of Ann, his now wife, 50 for the transportation of his brother Henry, and 100 for the transportation of two persons, Rob(er)t Warrell and Jon(athan) Wells." In 1638 he received 200 acres in Charles City Co., VA for transporting four persons. In 1642, he received 600 more acres for transporting twelve people, including his third (to be?) wife Katherine Banks. This plot bounded the lands of Edward Maddox "above Sherley hundred &c. on the river, to Dickinans Creeke."

His plantation eventually grew to 1,100 acres, and he built a residence called Doghams , named after the French river D'Augham. Doghams was located on the banks of the James River above "Shirley Hundred". This tract of land remained in the possession of the Royall family for almost 300 years.

Children of Joseph Royall Sr. and Katherine Banks
Capt. Joseph Royall (1646-1732) m. Mary Archer
Sarah Royall m. John Wilkinson
daughter who married Mr. Dennis
daughter who married Mr. Maschell
Katherine Royall m. Richard E. Perrin, s/o Thomas Perrin

(Note: After the death of Joseph Royall, Sr., Katherine Banks Royall married Henry Isham (1628-1676), s/o William Isham and Mary Brett.

Children of Catherine Banks Royall and Henry Isham
Anne Isham m. Col. Francis Eppes (m. 1685)
Mary Isham (abt. 1660-1735) m. Col. William Randolph (1650-1711), s/o Richard Randolph and Elizabeth Ryland
Henry Isham, Jr. (?-1678) (died at sea)

To follow William Randolph's line to the Thomas Jefferson link, Click Here

Children of Capt Joseph Royall and Mary Archer
Henry Royall (abt. 1680-1747) and Elizabeth Liege (1688-?) 2) Mary Bevell Kennon
Joseph Royall (1681-1747) m. Elizabeth Kennon (m. Dec., 1698)
Sarah Royall (abt. 1686-1740) m. William Tyler
William Royall (1688-1737) m. Sarah Povall Baxter (1690-?) (m. 1714, Powathan, VA)

Joseph Royall was Captain of Virginia Colonial Troops, a Vestryman in Curl Neck Church, Justice in Henrico County, VA, Sheriff of Henrico County, VA and a large landowner. His half-sister, Mary Isham, married Col. William Randolph.

Children of Henry Royall and 1) Elizabeth Liege
Francis Royall (abt. 1721-bef. 1746)

Children of Henry Royall and 2) Mary Bevell Kennon
Joseph Royall (?-bef. 1755) m. Sarah
William Royall (1724-1794) m. Mary (moved to Sampson Co., NC)

John Royall, Sr. (1729-1810) and Mary (moved to Surry Co., NC in 1807)

Children of Joseph Royall and Elizabeth Kennon
William Royall
John Royall
Elizabeth Royall m. John Archer

Children of William Royall and Sarah Povall Baxter
John Royall (1725-1766) m. Susannah

Children of William Royall and Mary
Young Royal (abt. 1755-1818) (died in Sampson Co., NC)
Edna Royal (1761) m. Mr. Anders
Lucy Royal (1763) m. Alexander Carrol
Hardy Royal (1767-1832) (died in Sampson Co., NC)
Isham Royal (1767-1832) m. Elizabeth
Betsey Royal (1769)

Children of John Royall, Sr. and Mary
William Royall (?-1823) m. Sally Robertson (abt. 1775-aft. 1830), prob. d/o James Robertson (died in Surry Co., NC)
Henry Royall m. Letty Hutt (m. in 1805)
Sarah Royall m. William Henry Allgood (buried in Allgood Cem., Surry Co., NC)
John Royall, Jr. (abt. 1750)
Joseph Royall (abt. 1765-1830) m. Elizabeth Rial or Elizabeth Thomas? (Joseph died in Ashe Co., NC)

Children of John Royall and Susannah
Mary Royall (1750-1830) m. William Bates

Children of William Royall and Sally Robertson
Henry Royall (abt.1795-1828) and Sarah Elizabeth Weatherman (abt. 1801-aft. 1860), d/o Christian Weatherman
Lodewick Royall (1807-aft. 1880) m. 1) Jane Faircloth (abt. 1808-aft. 1860), prob. d/o Jacob and Mary Faircloth 2) Sarah Day (abt. 1827-aft. 1880)

Children of John Royall, Jr. and Elizabeth Thomas
Thomas Royall (1795-1877) m. 1) Martha Norman (?-bef. 1819) 2) Elizabeth Hicks (?-bef. 1830) 3) Sarah (?-bef. 1850 4) Rosannah Sanders

Lodewick Royall and 1) Jane Faircloth
William Royal (abt. 1830) Henry Royal (abt. 1832-aft. 1858) m. Catherine Bell or Ball Nancy B. Royal (abt. 1835-aft. 1855) m. Simpson Duval Jacob Royal (abt. 1837) Mary Royal (abt. 1840-aft. 1880)
Willie D. Royal (abt. 1842-aft. 1866) m. E J. Gross Isaac R. Royal (abt. 1846-aft. 1865) m. Eliza M. Vanhoy Rosannah Malinda Royal (abt. 1848-aft. 1865) m. James R. Whitaker Lucinda C. Royal (abt. 1853-aft. 1870)
John A. Royal (abt. 1854-aft. 1870)

Children of Lodewick Royall and 2) Sarah Day
George Royall (abt. 1872-aft.1880)

Children of Henry Royall and Sarah Elizabeth Weatherman
Martha Caroline Royal (abt. 1820-aft. 1860) m. Joseph Reavis (abt. 1817-aft. 1860)
Christian Royal (1823-abt. 1870) m. Rosannah (abt. 1826-aft. 1880)
William Royal (1824-1900) m. Fannie Holcomb (abt. 1830-aft. 1900)
John Royal (1827-aft. 1880) m. Margaret J. King (abt 1829-aft. 1880), prob. d/o Charles King (m. 1851, Yadkin Co., NC)

Children of Christian Royal and Rosannah
John C. Royal (abt. 1843-aft. 1880) m. Sarah Jane Weatherman
Martha Jane Royal (abt. 1846-aft. 1860) m. William Moxley
E. Louisa Royal (abt. 1849-aft. 1880)
Racheal Malinda Royal (abt. 1851-aft. 1870) m. John S. Weatherman (abt. 1851-aft. 1870)
Sarah Elvira Royal (abt. 1854-aft. 1870)
Thomas Allen Royal (abt. 1858-1901) m. Sarah Caroline Mackey
Mary P. Royal (abt. 1860-aft. 1870) m. John Swaim
Christopher Columbus Royall (abt. 1861-1925) m. 1) Lettie C. Ireland (abt. 1882-bef. 1920) 2) Mary A. Hauser
Hanard Royal (abt. 1869-aft. 1870)

Children of William Royal and Fannie Holcomb
John Henry Royal (1850-aft. 1860)
William Asbury Royal (1852-1938) m. Emma Racinda Reinhardt (1854-1937), d/o Frederick Reinhardt and Rachel Holcomb
Nancy Jane Royal (1854-aft. 1860) m. Reid Hudspeth
James Pleasant Royal (1856-aft. 1880) m. M. Mary Hinson (abt. 1859-aft. 1900)
Calvin D. Royal (1859-1951) m. Martha P. Long (1859-aft. 1930)
Jones Wilson Royal (1866-1893) m. M. Emma Wood
A. Mary Royal (abt. 1871-aft. 1880)
Barrett Walter Royal (abt 1874-aft. 1900)

Children of John Royal and Margaret J. King
Slyvester L. Royal (abt. 1853-aft. 1860)
James E. Royal (abt. 1855-aft. 1860)
Nancy J. Royal (abt. 1856-aft. 1870)
William A. Royal (abt. 1857-aft. 1870)
Sarah E. Royal (abt. 1859-aft. 1870)
Mary F. Royal (abt. 1863-aft. 1870)
N. John Royal (abt. 1866-aft. 1880)
V. Lulu Royal (abt. 1868-aft. 1880)
E. Carrie Royal (abt. 1872-aft. 1880)

Children of William Asbury Royal and Emma Racinda Reinhardt
Fannie E. Royal (1875-aft. 1880) m. C. C. Marshall
James Fred Royall (1876-1952) m. Emma Rebecca Vannoy (1882-1930)
Theophilia Royal (1877-aft. 1880)
Paul Royal (1879-aft. 1900)
Rachel Vestie Royal (1884-aft. 1900) m. James Dudley (1901)
Sarah A. Royal (1887-aft. 1900) m. Charles Reece
Winnie J. Royal (1890-1987) m. Thomas R. Howell
Miles Shelah Royal (1897-1978) m. Elsie Renegar (abt. 1902-2002)

Children of Christopher Columbus Royall and Lettie C. Ireland
Robert Gray Royall (1904-aft. 1930) m. Mary Lillian Gilson abt. 1907-aft. 1930)

Children of James Fred Royal and Emma Rebecca Vannoy
Gurney Harold Royall (1905-1945) m. Grace Boggs
James Dawson Royall (1906-1986) m. Daisy Wood
Thomas L. Royall (1906-1926)
Walter Royall (1910-1971) m. Valeria Campbell (1916-1982), d/o John Campbell and Mary Catherine (Mamie) Gaddy
Fred Royall (1911-1990) m. Frances Steelman
John Frank Royall (1914)
Clarence Royall (abt. 1916)
Hoover Royall (abt. 1918)

Children of Walter Royall and Valerie Campbell
Worth Nelson Royall (1941-1974)
Helen Rebecca Royall (1943) m. 1) Jack Holleman 2) Vaughn Rose

This page is dedicated to the memory of my good friend, Worth Royall (1941-1974) and his sister, Helen, my oldest friend.

1850, 1860, 1870, 1880, 1900, 1910, 1920, 1930 US Federal Census Records from Forsyth and Yadkin Counties, NC


Life in Virginia

Thomas Farley and his wife Jane came to America in the ship named Ann. They arrived in Archers Hope, near Jamestown, Virginia, Feb. 23, 1623, the year after the terrible Indian Massacre of three hundred forty-seven inhabitants on the colony of Jamestown 1622. [Hotten's Lists, pp231-235.]

Accompanying them was a servant, Nicholas Shotten, age 40 yrs. [Original lists of persons of Quality, Lists of the livinge and dead in Virginia Febr 16,1623 Settlers living at "James Citty" in Virginia, February 4, 1624/5.]

Thomas Farley had a large plantation along the James River, across from Jamestown. He produced great quantities of tobacco for the English markets. He was twice elected to the House of Burgesses for the plantations between Harrop and Archer's Hope and Martin's Hundred at the session of March 1629-30 and for Archer's Hope February 1631-32. [Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. 19, page 132 and pp 147-8.].

He was a member of the established Church, the Episcopal Church. He was somewhat dilitary about church attendance as we find him arraigned before the Court in James City, 21 August, 1626, at which he, Thomas Farley, gent, confessed to "being absent from church on the Sabbath day for three months. It was determined by the Court that a fine of one hundred pounds of tobacco would restore him to his spiritual status. [Ibid., Vol. 26, page 4.]

From the minutes of the Council and General Court, 1622-1629: "Thomas Farley of Archer's Hope bargained with Widow Bush for the land he was settled on." [Ibid., Vol. 24, pages 240-241.]


Archer History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

The noble French surname Archer is of occupational origin, deriving from the trade or profession pursued by the first bearer. In this instance, the surname Archer derives from the French word "archer" which signifies "bowman," deriving from the Latin word "arcuarius or arcarius" which signifies "bow." Therefore, the surname Archer was used to distinguish a bowman or a maker of bows.

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Early Origins of the Archer family

The surname Archer was first found in the southern region of Provence. An early reference to the Archer name, shows that the Arquier family in Provence was listed among the ancient aristocracy of France.

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Early History of the Archer family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Archer research. Another 76 words (5 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Archer History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

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Archer Spelling Variations

Spelling variations of this family name include: Arquette, Arquier, Archer, Larquer, Larcher and many more.

Early Notables of the Archer family (pre 1700)

More information is included under the topic Early Archer Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Archer migration +

Some of the first settlers of this family name were:

Archer Settlers in United States in the 17th Century
  • Gabriel Archer, who arrived in New England in 1602 [1]
  • Georg Archer, who landed in Virginia in 1618 [1]
  • Samuel Archer, who arrived in Salem, Massachusetts in 1630 [1]
  • Jo Archer, who arrived in Virginia in 1635 [1]
  • Geo Archer, who landed in Virginia in 1635 [1]
  • . (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)
Archer Settlers in United States in the 18th Century
  • Robert Archer, who landed in Virginia in 1700 [1]
  • Michael Archer, who landed in Virginia in 1726 [1]
  • Thomas Archer, who arrived in Georgia in 1747 [1]
  • George Archer, who landed in New Jersey in 1764 [1]
  • Alexander Archer, his wife Jane, and four children, settled in Charles Town [Charleston], South Carolina in 1767
  • . (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)
Archer Settlers in United States in the 19th Century
  • Vincent Archer, aged 10, who landed in Key West, Fla in 1839 [1]
  • Mary Archer, aged 6, who landed in Key West, Fla in 1839 [1]
  • Augustus Archer, aged 12, who landed in Key West, Fla in 1839 [1]
  • Benj Archer, aged 35, who arrived in Key West, Fla in 1839 [1]
  • Charlotte Archer, aged 32, who landed in Key West, Fla in 1839 [1]
  • . (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

Archer migration to Canada +

Some of the first settlers of this family name were:

Archer Settlers in Canada in the 18th Century
  • Christopher Archer settled at St. John's, Newfoundland, in 1703 [2]
  • Richard Archer was a Constable in Trinity, Newfoundland, in 1730 [2]
  • Hy Archer, who landed in Nova Scotia in 1749
Archer Settlers in Canada in the 19th Century
  • James Archer, who landed in Nova Scotia in 1826
  • Margaret Archer, who arrived in Saint John, New Brunswick aboard the ship "Eleanor" in 1834
  • Thomas Archer, who arrived in Saint John, New Brunswick aboard the ship "Eleanor" in 1834
  • Ellen Archer, who landed in Nova Scotia in 1844

Archer migration to Australia +

Emigration to Australia followed the First Fleets of convicts, tradespeople and early settlers. Early immigrants include:

Archer Settlers in Australia in the 19th Century
  • William Archer, English convict from Oxford, who was transported aboard the "Arab" on July 3, 1822, settling in Van Diemen's Land, Australia[3]
  • Mr. William Archer, British convict who was convicted in Shropshire, England for life, transported aboard the "Bussorah Merchant" on 1st October 1829, arriving in Tasmania ( Van Diemen's Land) [4]
  • Mr. Thomas Archer, (b. 1802), aged 31, English gardener who was convicted in Somerset, England for 7 years for larceny, transported aboard the "Atlas" on 27th April 1833, arriving in Tasmania ( Van Diemen's Land) [5]
  • Mr. William Archer, (b. 1803), aged 30, English labourer who was convicted in Essex, England for life for stealing, transported aboard the "Captain Cook" on 2nd May 1833, arriving in New South Wales, Australia[6]
  • Mr. William Archer, English convict who was convicted in Oxford, Oxfordshire, England for life, transported aboard the "Augusta Jessie" on 27 September 1834, arriving in Tasmania ( Van Diemen's Land) [7]
  • . (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

Archer migration to New Zealand +

Emigration to New Zealand followed in the footsteps of the European explorers, such as Captain Cook (1769-70): first came sealers, whalers, missionaries, and traders. By 1838, the British New Zealand Company had begun buying land from the Maori tribes, and selling it to settlers, and, after the Treaty of Waitangi in 1840, many British families set out on the arduous six month journey from Britain to Aotearoa to start a new life. Early immigrants include:


Archer: The History Of Abbiejean, Archer's Daughter, Explained

Let's look at how Sterling Archer and Lana Kane ended up having a surprise daughter, Abbiejean, and how she's already grown.

Archer typically features a cast of destructive and unpredictable loose cannons, with the most chaotic being the titular Sterling Archer. But the birth of his daughter with Lana changed everything for Sterling -- and the entire trajectory of the show as a whole. Let's look at how Sterling and Lana Kane ended up having a surprise daughter and how she's already grown.

During the early seasons of Archer, Lana Kane had an on-again-off-again romance with Cyril Figgis, while denying any lingering attraction to her ex, Sterling. However, after leaving Cyril and hinting at a desire to become a mother, Lana eventually took a frozen sperm sample from Archer and used it to induce a pregnancy -- which was revealed in the second half of Season 4's "Sea Tunt." Lana spent most of Season 5 pregnant, largely keeping her out of the field. At the end of the season, Lana gives birth to a girl, Abbijean, and reveals the truth of her parentage to Archer. A recurring plot element of Season 6 was how the existence of Abbijean -- who naturally picked up elements of her father's personality -- affected Archer and Lana's relationship, with the pair eventually deciding to give an actual romance another shot.

But this crumbled over the course of Season 7, which ended with Archer in a coma after being gunned down by Veronica Deane. When Archer awoke in the final moments of Season 10, he learned everyone around him had changed in his absence. Notably, Lana had married a wealthy businessman named Robert and convinced Lana to send AJ to a Swiss boarding school -- an idea that enrages Archer, who had terrible experiences growing up in such an environment. AJ has also developed a close relationship with Robert, even referring to him as her father.

But AJ is kidnapped in Season 11's "Caught Napping," requiring Archer, Lana, Robert, and the rest of their allies into motion to rescue her. The episode forces Lana to confront the possibility that, as Mallory did with Archer, she purposefully sent AJ further away so she could focus on her work in the world of spycraft. Confronting the kidnapper -- the villainous Peregrine -- AJ was almost taken away to be turned into an assassin who would one day return to kill her parents. But AJ escaped, and her parents were able to rescue her and gun down Peregrine. AJ represents a genuine rarity in Archer -- a source of unmitigated kindness from the cast of typically aggressive characters.

AJ has been shown bringing out the softer side in everyone, from Pam to even the constantly cold Mallory. When AJ was in trouble, the whole group went into "rampage" mode, giving them incredible fury over any potential harm that befell her. AJ is also the ultimate test for Archer's morality, with the typically unflappable super-spy actually becoming highly protective of her as time wears on. She's one of the few possible chances Archer and Lana have ever had to actually make the world a better place, as opposed to just blowing stuff up in the name of profit.

Archer has also, despite himself, matured in some small but fundamental ways since becoming a father, with that element of his life hinting at his true potential to grow as a person. It'll be interesting to see how the character develops going forward into the upcoming Season 12, especially with her now having finally gotten the chance to meet her birth father and have him be a part of her life.


Watch the video: Jane Archer Canada Day Performance (June 2022).


Comments:

  1. Gabriel

    In it something is. Thanks for an explanation. All ingenious is simple.



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