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Chenango AO-31 - History

Chenango AO-31 - History


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ChenangoII

(AO-31: dp. 11,400; 1. 553'; b. 76'; ew. 114'3"; dr. 32';
s. 18 k.; cpl. 1,080; a. 2 6"; cl. Sangamon)

The second Chenango (CVE-28) was launched 1 April 1939 as Esso New Orleans by Sun Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Co., Chester, Pa.; sponsored by Mrs. Rathbone;acquired by the Navy 31 May 1941; and commissioned 20 June 1941 as AO-31, Commander W. H. Mays in command.

Assigned to the Naval Transportation Service, Chenango steamed in the Atlantic, the Caribbean and the Pacific as far as Honolulu on tanker duty. Chenango was present at Aruba, N.W.I., 16 February 1942 when a German submarine shelled one of the island's refineries. She was decommissioned at New York 16 March 1942 for conversion to an escort carrier.

Her conversion complete, she was recommissioned as ACV-28, 19 September 1942. Carrying Army aircraft, Chenango sailed 23 October with the assault force bound for North Africa and on 10 November, flew off her aircraft to newly won Port Lysutey, French Morocco. She put to Casablanca 13 November to refuel 21 destroyers before returning to Norfolk 30 November 1942, battling through a hurricane en route which caused extensive damage.

Quickly repaired, Chenango was underway for the Pacific by mid-December 1942. Arriving at Noumea 18 January 1943 she joined the escort carrier group providing air cover for supply convoys supporting the invasion and occupation of the Solomons. One of her air groups was sent to Henderson Field, Guadalcanal, to give close support to Marines ashore. One of Chenango's duties during this period was to stand sentry off the fiercely contested island. As part of her Solomons operations, Chenango's planes formed an air umbrella to escort to safety St. Louis (C~49) and Honolulu (CL-48) after the cruisers were damaged in the Battle of Kolombangara on 13 July 1943. Redesignated CVE-28 on 15 July 1943, Chenango returned to Mare Island 18 August 1943 for an overhaul then acted as training carrier for new air groups until 19 October when she steamed from San Diego to join the Gilbert Islands invasion force at Espiritu Santo 5 November. During the invasion of Tarawa (20 November-8 December), her planes covered the advance of the attack force, bombed and staffed beaches ahead of the invading troops, and protected off-shore convoys. She returned to San Diego for another period of training duty.

Steaming from San Diego 13 January 1944, Chenango supported the invasion landings on Roi, Kwajalein and Eniwetok in the Marshalls operation. After protecting the service group refueling fleet units engaged in the Palau strikes, Chenango arrived at Espiritu Santo 7 April. She sortied for the landings at Aitape and Hollandia (16 April-12 May), then joined TG 53.7 for the invasion of the Marianas. Her planes crippled airfleld installations, sank enemy shipping, and hammered harbor facilities on Pagan Island, as well as conducting valuable photographic reconnaissance on Guam. From 8 July, she joined in daily poundings of Guam, preparing for the island's invasion. She returned to Manus 13 August to replenish and conduct training.

From 10 to 29 September 1944 Chenango joined in the neutralization of enemy airfields in the Halmaheras in support of the invasion of Morotai, stepping-stone to the Philippines. After preparations at Manus, Chenango cleared 12 October to conduct softening up strikes on Leyte in preparation for the invasion landings 20 October. Chenango and her sister ship Sangamon (26TH) were attacked by three Japanese planes on the afternoon of D-day and splashed them all, capturing one of the pilots. Shilling to Morotai to fond new aircraft, Chenango was not in action waters during the Battle for Leyte Gulf, but returned 28 October to provide replacement aircraft to her victorious sister escort carriers, who had held the Japanese fleet off from Leyte Next day she sailed for overhaul at Seattle until 9 February 1945.

Arriving at Tulagi in the Solomons 4 March 1946, Chenango conducted training, then sortied from Ulithi 27 March for the invasion of Okinawa. She gave air cover in the feint landings on the southern tip of the island, then was assigned to neutralize the kamikaze chases in Sakashima Gunto. On 9 April a crash-landing fighter started a raging fire among the strike-loaded aircraft on Chenango's deck. Skillful work by her crew saved the ship from serious damage and she remained in action off Okinawa until 11 June. After escorting a tanker convoy to San Pedro Bay, Chenango sailed 26 July to join the logistics force for the 3d Fleet, then engaged in the final offensive against Japan. Following the cease-fire, Chenango supported the occupation forces and evacuated some 1,900 Allied prisoners of war and 1,500 civilians from slave labor camps. She cleared Tokyo Bay 25 October and after a brief overhaul at San Diego, returned to "Magic Carpet" duty, transporting veterans from Okinawa and Pearl Harbor to the west coast. Chenango sailed from San Pedro, Calif., 6 February for Boston, and was placed out of commission in reserve there 14 August 1946. She was reclassified CVHE-28, 12 June 1955, stricken from the Navy List 1 March 1969, sold, and removed from naval custody 12 February 1960.

Chenango was awarded the Navy Unit Commendation and received 11 battle stars for World War II service.


USS Chenango (CVE-28)

The second USS Chenango (CVE-28) (originally designated as T3 Tanker oiler AO-31, after re-designation as an escort carrier, was first ACV-28) was launched on 1 April 1939 as Esso New Orleans by the Sun Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Company, in Chester, Pennsylvania, sponsored by Mrs. Rathbone acquired by the United States Navy on 31 May 1941 and commissioned on 20 June 1941 as AO-31, with Commander W. H. Mays in command. [1]

  • CVE-28, 15 July 1943
  • CVHE-28, 12 June 1955
  • 75 ft (23 m)
  • 114 ft 3 in (34.82 m) extreme width
  • 2 × steam turbines
  • 2 × shafts
  • 11 battle stars

Ancient Origins of Halloween

Halloween’s origins date back to the ancient Celtic festival of Samhain (pronounced sow-in). The Celts, who lived 2,000 years ago, mostly in the area that is now Ireland, the United Kingdom and northern France, celebrated their new year on November 1.

This day marked the end of summer and the harvest and the beginning of the dark, cold winter, a time of year that was often associated with human death. Celts believed that on the night before the new year, the boundary between the worlds of the living and the dead became blurred. On the night of October 31 they celebrated Samhain, when it was believed that the ghosts of the dead returned to earth.

In addition to causing trouble and damaging crops, Celts thought that the presence of the otherworldly spirits made it easier for the Druids, or Celtic priests, to make predictions about the future. For a people entirely dependent on the volatile natural world, these prophecies were an important source of comfort during the long, dark winter.

To commemorate the event, Druids built huge sacred bonfires, where the people gathered to burn crops and animals as sacrifices to the Celtic deities. During the celebration, the Celts wore costumes, typically consisting of animal heads and skins, and attempted to tell each other’s fortunes.

When the celebration was over, they re-lit their hearth fires, which they had extinguished earlier that evening, from the sacred bonfire to help protect them during the coming winter.

Did you know? One quarter of all the candy sold annually in the U.S. is purchased for Halloween.

By 43 A.D., the Roman Empire had conquered the majority of Celtic territory. In the course of the 400 years that they ruled the Celtic lands, two festivals of Roman origin were combined with the traditional Celtic celebration of Samhain.

The first was Feralia, a day in late October when the Romans traditionally commemorated the passing of the dead. The second was a day to honor Pomona, the Roman goddess of fruit and trees. The symbol of Pomona is the apple, and the incorporation of this celebration into Samhain probably explains the tradition of bobbing for apples that is practiced today on Halloween.


U.S.S. CHENANGO

USS Chenango was the second by that name. The name comes from a river, county and town in the state of New York. The ship was built and launched as the Esso New Orleans in 1939. The Navy acquired the ship and redesignated her as AO-31 Chenango in June 1941. She did tanker duty in the Atlantic, Caribbean and Pacific.

Decommission
Her first decommission happened in March 1942 when she underwent a conversion to an escort carrier. She came back into service as ACV-28 in September 1942. She transported an assault force to Morocco before beginning a return voyage in late November. En route she was heavily damaged in a hurricane. After being repaired, the ship was sent to the Pacific.

In January 1943, Chenango provided air cover for supply convoys going to the Solomons. She also stood guard duty off of Guadalcanal. In July 1943, she was redesignated CVE-28. In August 1943, she underwent an overhaul.

Her Role in Pacific Operations
Over the next couple of years, this ship was a part of many vital Pacific operations. She was involved with the invasions of Tarawa, Roi, Kwajalein, Eniwetok, Aitape, Hollandia, Pagan Island, Guam, Morotai, Leyte, and Okinawa. She also provided support during the final offensive against Japan. She transported men and equipment home after the war. She was put into reserve Aug. 14, 1946. In 1959, she was removed from the Navy list.


Dictionary of American Naval Fighting Ships

The second Chenango (CVE-28) was launched 1 April 1939 as Esso New Orleans by Sun Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Co., Chester, Pa. sponsored by Mrs. Rathbone acquired by the Navy 31 May 1941 and commissioned 20 June 1941 as AO-31, Commander W.H. Mays in command.

Assigned to the Naval Transportation Service, Chenango steamed in the Atlantic, the Caribbean and the Pacific as far as Honolulu on tanker duty. Chenango was present at Aruba, N.W.I., 16 February 1942 when a German submarine shelled one of the island's refineries. She was decommissioned at new York 16 March 1942 for conversion to an escort carrier.

Her conversion complete, she was recommissioned as ACV-28, 19 September 1942. Carrying Army aircraft, Chenango sailed 23 October with the assault force bound for North Africa and on 10 November, flew off her aircraft to newly won Port Lyautey, French Morocco. She put in to Casablanca 13 November to refuel 21 destroyers before returning to Norfolk 30 November 1942, battling through a hurricane en route which caused extensive damage.

Quickly repaired, Chenango was underway for the Pacific by mid-December 1942. Arriving at Noumea, 18 January 1943 she joined the escort carrier group providing air cover for supply convoys supporting the invasion and occupation of the Solomons. One of her air groups was sent to Henderson Field, Guadalcanal, to give close support to Marines ashore. One of Chenango's duties during this period was to stand sentry off the fiercely contested island. As part of her Solomons operations, Chenango's planes formed an air umbrella to escort to safety St. Louis (CL-49) and Honolulu (CL-48) after the cruisers were damaged in the Battle of Kolombangara on 13 July 1943. Redesignated CVE-28 on 15 July 1943, Chenango returned to Mare Island 18 August 1943 for an overhaul, then acted as training carrier for new air groups until 19 October when she steamed from San Diego to join the Gilbert Islands invasion force as Espiritu Santo 5 November. During the invasion of Tarawa (20 November--8 December), her planes covered the advance of the attack force, bombed and strafed beaches ahead of the invading troops, and protected off-shore convoys. She returned to San Diego for another period of training duty.

Steaming from San Diego 13 January 1944, Chenango supported the invasion landings on Roi, Kwajalein and Eniwetok in the Marshalls operation. After protecting the service group refueling fleet units engaged in the Palau strikes, Chenango arrived at Espiritu Santo 7 April. She sortied for the landings at Aitape and Hollandia (16 April--12 May), then joined TG 53.7 for the invasion of the Marianas. Her planes crippled airfield installations, sank enemy shipping, and hammered harbor facilities on Pagan Island, as well as conducting valuable photographic reconnaissance on Guam. From 8 July, she joined in daily poundings of Guam, preparing for the island's invasion. She returned to Manus 13 August to replenish and conduct training.

From 10 to 29 September 1944 Chenango joined in the neutralization of enemy airfields in the Halmaheras in support of the invasion of Morotai, stepping-stone to the Philippines. After preparations at Manus, Chenango cleared 12 October to conduct softening up strikes on Leyte in preparation for the invasion landings 20 October. Chenango and her sister ship Sangamon (CVE-26) were attacked by three Japanese places on the afternoon of D-day and splashed them all, capturing one of the pilots. Sailing to Morotai to load new aircraft, Chenango was not in action waters during the Battle for Leyte Gulf, but returned 28 October to provide replacement aircraft to her victorious sister escort carriers, who had held the Japanese fleet off from Leyte. Next day she sailed for overhaul at Seattle until 9 February 1945.

Arriving at Tulagi in the Solomons 4 March 1945, Chenango conducted training, then sortied from Ulithi 27 March for the invasion of Okinawa. She gave air cover in the feint landings on the southern tip of the island, then was assigned to neutralize the kamikaze bases in Sakashima Gunto. On 9 April a crash-landing fighter started a raging fire among the strike-loaded aircraft on the Chenango's deck. Skillful work by her crew saved the ship from serious damage and she remained in action off Okinawa until 11 June. After escorting a tanker convoy to San Pedro Bay, Chenango sailed 26 July to join the logistics force for the 3d Fleet, then engaged in the final offensive against Japan. Following the cease-fire, Chenango supported the occupation forces and evacuated some 1,900 Allied prisoners of war and 1,500 civilians from slave labor camps. She cleared Tokyo Bay 25 October and after a brief overhaul at San Diego, returned to "Magic Carpet" duty, transporting veterans from Okinawa and Pearl Harbor to the west coast. Chenango sailed from San Pedro, Calif., 5 February for Boston, and was placed out of commission in reserve there 14 August 1946. She was reclassified CVHE-28, 12 June 1955, stricken from the Navy List 1 March 1959, sold, and removed from naval custody 12 February 1960.

Chenango was awarded the Navy Unit Commendation and received 11 battle stars for World War II service. Transcribed and formatted for HTML by Patrick Clancey, HyperWar Foundation


USS Chenango (CVE 28)

Launched as the Esso New Orleans. Aquired by the US Navy on 31 May 1941 and commissioned on 20 June 1941 as AO-31. Decomissioned for conversion 16 March 1942. Converted at Bethlehem, Staten Island and commissioned on 19 September 1942. Damaged by an aircraft crash on 9 April 1945. Decommissioned 14 August 1946. Stricken 1 March 1959. Sold 12 February 1960 and scrapped in 1962.

Commands listed for USS Chenango (CVE 28)

Please note that we're still working on this section.

CommanderFromTo
1Cdr. William Harold Mays, USN20 Jun 194116 Mar 1942

2T/Capt. Ben Harrison Wyatt, USN19 Sep 19421 Oct 1943
3T/Capt. Dixwell Ketcham, USN1 Oct 194313 Aug 1944
4Cdr. George van Deurs, USN13 Aug 19442 May 1945
5Cdr. Harry Donald Felt, USN2 May 194513 Jan 1946
6Cdr. Harry Donald Felt, USN2 May 194513 Jan 1946

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Chenango AO-31 - History

Sangamon class escort aircraft carriers
Displacement: 23,875 tons full load
Dimensions: 525 x 75 x 30.5 feet/160 x 22.8 x 9.3 meters
Extreme Dimensions: 553 x 114.5 x 30.5 feet/168.5 x 35 x 9.3 meters
Propulsion: Steam turbines, 4 450 psi boilers, 2 shafts, 13,500 hp, 18 knots
Crew: 830
Armor: none
Armament: 2 single 5/51 DP, 4 dual 40 mm AA, 12 single 20 mm AA
Aircraft: 36

Concept/Program: This group of ships was converted early in the CVE program, when the need for carriers was greatest and the number of available hulls was small. Following the conversion of the first 6 C3 freighter hulls there was an immediate need for additional hulls suitable for conversion, so these ships joined the CVE program. They had been built as merchant tankers but had been taken over as fleet oilers.

Design/Conversion: These ships underwent a more extensive conversion than other early CVEs. They had long hangars and flight decks, small island, and a single catapult. They were much larger and faster than the C4 and S4 types, allowing them to function more effectively in combat roles. Following conversion they retained facilities to carry oil cargo and to operate as oilers. These were by far the best of the converted CVEs.

Variations: No significant variations.

Modifications: By the end of WWII the gun battery was 2 quad and 12 dual 40 mm AA, and 13 dual 20 mm AA. A second catapult was added in 1944. Other modifications were minor in nature.

Classification: Classified as AOs when first taken over for naval service. Reclassed as AVGs when they joined the escort carrier program designations changed to ACV and later CVE as with other ships of the type. Survivors became CVHE in 1955 while in reserve.

Operational: Found to be very good aircraft operating platforms, better than any of the other CVEs (except the later T3-types), and much steadier than the CVLs. These ships operated together during much of the war. During the 1942 they supported Operation Torch, the invasion of North Africa. From late 1942 on three ships operated in the Pacific, serving as fleet carriers during the 1942-43 carrier shortage. They saw far more combat than most CVEs, although they also filled the typical transport and training roles. Santee remained in the Atlantic until early 1944 when she joined her sisters in the Pacific. At times these ships operated as oilers.

Departure from Service/Disposal: One ship discarded at the end of WWII due to damage sustained in combat others laid up during immediate postwar fleet reductions. Postwar they were seen as possible helicopter carriers or aircraft transports. Remained in reserve until discarded in 1959.

DANFS History

Built by Federal (Kearny). Laid down 13 March 1939, launched 4 Nov 1939, completed as merchant tanker (date?). Acquired by USN 22 Oct 1940 as oiler, redesignated AO 28 and renamed 12 April 1941. Redesignated AVG 26 14 Feb 1942 converted at to carrier Newport News, commissioned 25 Aug 1942. Designation changed from AVG to ACV 20 August 1942 prior to commissioning.

Designation changed from ACV to CVE 15 July 1943. Bombed 19 Oct 1944, kamikaze 25 Oct 1944 at Leyte, kamikaze 4 May 1945. In repair and overhaul for the remainder of the war. Repairs incomplete at the end of the war decommissioned and stricken for disposal 24 Oct 1945. Sold and scrapped in 1948.

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Suwannee
ex merchant Markay
AO 33 - AVG 27 - ACV 27 - CVE 27 - CVHE 27
Photos: [During WWII],

DANFS History

Built by Federal (Kearny). Laid down 3 June 1939, launched 4 March 1940, completed as a merchant tanker (date?). Acquired by USN 26 June 1941 as oiler, redesignated AO 33 and renamed commissioned as oiler 9 July 1941. Redesignated AVG 27 14 Feb 1942 converted to carrier at Newport News, commissioned 24 Sept 1942. Designation changed from AVG to ACV 20 August 1942 prior to commissioning.

Designation changed from ACV to CVE 15 July 1943. Bombed 25 and 26 Oct 1944, damaged by internal explosion 24 May 1945. Decommissioned to reserve 28 Oct 1946. Redesignated as a helicopter escort carrier (CVHE 27) 12 June 1955 while in reserve. Stricken for disposal 1 March 1959. Sold and scrapped in 1962.

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Chenango
ex merchant Esso New Orleans
AO 31 - AVG 28 - ACV 28 - CVE 28 - CVHE 28
Photos: [As tanker Esso New Orleans ], [During WWII]

DANFS History

Built by Sun Shipbuilding. Laid down 10 July 1938, launched 4 Jan 1939, completed as merchant tanker (date?). Acquired by USN 31 May 1941 as oiler, redesignated AO 31 and renamed commissioned as oiler 20 June 1941. Redesignated AVG 28 and decomissioned for conversion 16 Mar 1942, converted at Bethlehem Staten Island, commissioned 19 Sept 1942. Designation changed from AVG to ACV 20 August 1942 prior to commissioning.

Designation changed from ACV to CVE 15 July 1943. Damaged by aircraft crash 9 April 1945. Decommissioned to reserve 14 Aug 1946, Redesignated as a helicopter escort carrier (CVHE 28) 12 June 1955 while in reserve. Stricken for disposal 1 March 1959. Sold and scrapped in 1962.

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Santee
ex merchant Seakay
AO 29 - AVG 29 - ACV 29 - CVE 29 - CVHE 29
Photos: [During WWII]

DANFS History

Built by Sun Shipbuilding. Laid down 31 May 1938, launched 4 March 1939, completed as merchant tanker (date?). Acquired by USN 30 Oct 1940 as oiler redesignated AO 29 and renamed. Redesignated AVG 29 9 Jan 1942 converted to carrier at Norfolk Navy, commissioned 24 Aug 1942. Designation changed from AVG to ACV 20 August 1942 prior to commissioning.

Designation changed from ACV to CVE 15 July 1943. Torpedoed 25 Oct 1944, damaged by aircraft accident 7/45. Decommissioned to reserve 21 Oct 1946. Redesignated as a helicopter escort carrier (CVHE 29) 12 June 1955 while in reserve. Stricken for disposal 1 March 1959. Sold and scrapped in 1960.

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Commencement Bay class escort aircraft carriers
Displacement: 21,397 tons full load
Dimensions: 525 x 75 x 30.5 feet/150 x 22.9 x 9.3 meters
Extreme Dimensions: 557 x 105 x 30.5 feet/169.8 x 32 x 9.3 meters
Propulsion: Steam turbines, 4 450 psi boilers, 2 shafts, 16,000 hp, 19 knots
Crew: 1054
Armor: none
Armament: 2 single 5/38 DP, 3 quad, 12 dual 40 mm AA, 20 single 20 mm AA
Aircraft: 33

Concept/Program: The ultimate escort carriers. These ships were based on the successful T3 tanker hull all were built as carriers from the keel up. They entered service late in the war and postwar many saw little or no operational service. Many were cancelled prior to completion. Postwar they were seen as potential helicopter, fixed-wing ASW, or transport carriers.

Design: Similar to Sangamon class, but with improvements in engine and boiler layout. Two catapults were fitted.

Modifications: Gun armament was reduced after the war all 20 mm guns were removed. Several were upgraded for service as ASW carriers postwar they received strengthened and enlarged islands and gun armament was further reduced.

Modernization: No major modernizations. Extensive reconstruction plans were drawn up but not carried out.

Classification: Reclassified as CVHE or AKV while in reserve depending on the mission they would have undertaken if reactivated.

Operational: Many vessels commissioned only briefly before going into reserve. Postwar a several ships remained in service, or were reactivated, as ASW carriers these were replaced by Essex class ships and relegated to reserve.

Departure from Service/Disposal: Many ships were in and out of service during the 1940's and 1950's all ended up in reserve by the late 1950's and remained laid up until discarded around 1970.

Other Notes: Two ships were reactivated from reserve to serve as aircraft transports for Vietnam service they were stripped of all armament. They had civilian crews and operated under the Military Sea Transport Service (MSTS), not under naval control they were "in service" rather than "in commission" and their designations were preceded by "T-". One ship was converted to a major communications relay ship (AGMR).

Commencement Bay
ex St. Joseph Bay
CVE 105 - CVHE 105 - AKV 37
Photos: [During WWII]

DANFS History

Built by Todd-Pacific. Laid down 23 Sept 1943, launched 4 May 1944, renamed 5 July 1944, commissioned 27 Nov 1944.

Served mostly as a training carrier in the Pacific. Decommissioned to reserve 30 Nov 1946. Redesignated as a helicopter escort carrier (CVHE 105) 12 June 1955 redesignated as an aviation transport (AKV 37) 7 May 1959, both while in reserve. Stricken for disposal 1 April 1971. Subsequently sold and scrapped.

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Block Island
ex Sunset Bay
CVE 106 - LPH 1 - CVE 106 - AKV 38
Photos: [During WWII], [During 1950's reactivation].

DANFS History

Built by Todd-Pacific. Laid down 25 Oct 1943, launched 10 June 1944, commissioned 30 Dec 1944.

Served in the Pacific in 1945. Decommissioned to reserve 28 May 1946 used as a school ship at Annapolis while in reserve. Recommissioned as an ASW carrier 28 April 1951. Decommissioned to reserve 27 Aug 1954

Redesignated LPH 1 22 Dec 1957 while in reserve, but conversion to LPH was cancelled 6/1958 prior to start of conversion work. Returned to original designation 17 Feb 1959. Redesignated as an aviation transport (AKV 38) 7 May 1959 while in reserve. Stricken for disposal 1 July 1959. Sold and scrapped in Japan in 1960.

DANFS History

Built by Todd-Pacific. Laid down 29 Nov 1943, renamed 26 April 1944, launched 20 July 1944, commissioned 5 Feb 1945.

Served in the Pacific late in the war. Decommissioned to reserve 21 May 1946. Recommissioned 7 Sept 1951 for Korean War service served mainly as a transport. Decommissioned to reserve 15 January 1955. Redesignated as an aviation transport (AKV 39) 7 May 1959 while in reserve. Stricken for disposal 1 June 1961

Reinstated on Naval Vessels Register 1 November 1961 for conversion to a communications relay ship for service off Vietnam. Converted at New York Navy Yard 1962-1964. Redesignated AGMR 1, 1 June 1963, renamed Annapolis 22 June 1963. completed and recommissioned 7 March 1964. Conversion included removal of all old guns entire flight deck was converted to an "antenna farm", the island was rebuilt, forward flight deck modified and enclosed bow fitted 4 dual 3/50 AA added.

Decommissioned to reserve 20 December 1969. Stricken for disposal 15 Oct 1976. Subsequently sold and scrapped.

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Kula Gulf
ex Vermillion Bay
CVE 108 - AKV 8 - T-AKV 8
Photos: [As completed] [During 1950's reactivation]

DANFS History

Built by Todd-Pacific, completed at Willamette. Renamed 6 Nov 1943. Laid down 29 Nov 1943, launched 20 July 1944, commissioned 12 May 1945.

Briefly operated in the Pacific. Decommissioned to reserve 3 July 1946. Recommissioned for Korean War service 15 Feb 1951 served mostly as a transport and training carrier. Decommissioned to reserve 15 Dec 1955. Redesignated as an aviation transport (AKV 8) 7 May 1959 while in reserve.

Reactivated as aircraft transport 30 June 1965 operated with civilian crew under MSTS control as T-AKV 8. Placed out of service 6 Oct 1969. Stricken for disposal 15 Sept 1970. Subsequently sold and scrapped.

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Cape Gloucester
ex Willapa Bay
CVE 109 - CVHE 109 - AKV 9
Photos: [As completed]

DANFS History

Built by Todd-Pacific. Laid down 10 Jan 1944, renamed 26 April 1944, launched 12 Sept 1944, commissioned 5 March 1945.

Served in the Pacific late in the war. Decommissioned to reserve 5 Nov 1946. Stricken for disposal 1 June 1960 but reinstated on the Naval Vessels Register 1 July 1960. Stricken for disposal 1 April 1971. Subsequently sold and scrapped.

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Salerno Bay
ex Winjah Bay
CVE 110 - AKV 10
Photos: [As completed]

DANFS History

Built by Todd-Pacific, completed at Commercial Iron Works. Laid down 7 Feb 1944, launched 29 Sept 1944, commissioned 19 May 1945.

Served as a training carrier. Decommissioned to reserve 4 Oct 1947. Recommissioned as an ASW carrier 20 June 1951. Decommissioned to reserve 16 February 1954. Redesignated as an aviation transport (AKV 10) 7 May 1959 while in reserve. Stricken for disposal 1 June 1961. Sold and scrapped at Bilbao in 1962.

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Vella Gulf
ex Totem Bay
CVE 111 - CVHE 111 - AKV 11
Photos: [As completed]

DANFS History

Built by Todd-Pacific. Laid down 7 March 1944, renamed 26 April 1944, launched 19 Oct 1944, commissioned 9 April 1945.

Served as a training carrier Decommissioned to reserve 9 Aug 1946. Redesignated as a helicopter escort carrier (CVHE 111) 12 June 1955 redesignated as an aviation transport (AKV 11) 7 May 1959, both while in reserve. Planned conversion to AGMR 2 cancelled 1960's. Stricken for disposal 1 Dec 1970. Sold and scrapped in 1971.

DANFS History

Built by Todd-Pacific. Laid down 1 April 1944, launched 9 Nov 1944, commissioned 14 May 1945.

Laid up in reserve 11/1949 but not decommissioned. Returned to service as a transport 3/1948. Decommissioned to reserve 1/1949. Recommissioned as an ASW carrier 22 Jan 1950. Decommissioned to reserve 3 June 1956. Redesignated as an aviation transport (AKV 12) 7 May 1959 while in reserve. Stricken for disposal 1 June 1970. Sold and scrapped in 1971.

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Puget Sound
ex Hobart Bay
CVE 113 - CVHE 113 - AKV 13
Photos: [As completed]

DANFS History

Built by Todd-Pacific. Laid down 12 May 1944, launched 30 Nov 1944, renamed 5 June 1944, commissioned 18 June 1945.

Decommissioned to reserve 18 Oct 1946. Redesignated as a helicopter escort carrier (CVHE 113) 12 June 1955 redesignated as an aviation transport (AKV 13) 7 May 1959, both while in reserve. Stricken for disposal 1 June 1960. Sold and scrapped at Hong Kong in 1962.

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Rendova
ex Mosser Bay
CVE 114 - AKV 14
Photos: [During 1950's reactivation]

DANFS History

Built by Todd-Pacific, completed at Willamette. Laid down 15 June 1944, launched 28 Dec 1944, commissioned 22 Oct 1945.

Decommissioned to reserve 27 Jan 1950. Recommissioned 3 Jan 1951. During her two commissions she served at various times as an ASW, support, training and transport carrier, including Korea service. Decommissioned to reserve 30 June 1955. Redesignated as an aviation transport (AKV 14) 7 May 1959 while in reserve. Stricken for disposal 1 April 1971. Sold and scrapped in 1971.

DANFS History

Built by Todd-Pacific. Laid down 25 July 1944, launched 25 Jan 1944, commissioned 16 July 1945.

Decommissioned to reserve 14 April 1950 but recommissioned 12 Sept 1950. Saw service off Korea damaged by explosion 9 May 1951. Decommissioned to reserve 18 Feb 1955. Redesignated as an aviation transport (AKV 15) 7 May 1959 while in reserve. Stricken for disposal 1 April 1960. Sold and scrapped at Hong Kong 1/61.

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Badoeng Strait
ex San Alberto Bay
CVE 116 - AKV 16
Photos: [As completed], [1950's].

DANFS History

Built by Todd-Pacific, completed at Commercial Iron Works. Laid down 18 Aug 1944, launched 15 Feb 1945, commissioned 14 Nov 1945.

Decommissioned to reserve 20 April 1946 but recommissioned 6 Jan 1947. Saw extensive service as ASW trials and tactics development ship, and as an ASW carrier during the Korean war. Decommissioned to reserve 17 May 1957. Redesignated as an aviation transport (AKV 16) 7 May 1959 while in reserve. stricken for disposal 1 Dec 1970. Sold and scrapped in 1972.

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Saidor
ex Saltery Bay
CVE 117 - CVHE 117 - AKV 17
Photos: [As completed]

DANFS History

Built by Todd-Pacific. Laid down 30 Sept 1944, launched 17 March 1945, commissioned 4 Sept 1945.

Decommissioned to reserve 12 Sept 1947. Redesignated as a helicopter escort carrier (CVHE 117) 12 June 1955 redesignated as an aviation transport (AKV 17) 7 May 1959, both while in reserve. Stricken for disposal 1 Dec 1970. Sold and scrapped in 1971.

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Sicily
ex Sandy Bay
CVE 118 - AKV 18
Photos: [ Sicily in the 1950's].

DANFS History

Built by Todd-Pacific, completed at Willamette. Laid down 23 Oct 1944, launched 14 April 1945, commissioned 27 Feb 1946.

Employed as an ASW carrier off Korea. Decommissioned to reserve 5 July 1954. Redesignated as an aviation transport (AKV 18) 7 May 1959 while in reserve. stricken for disposal 1 July 1960. Sold and scrapped at Hong Kong 1/61.

DANFS History

Built by Todd-Pacific. Laid down 4 Dec 1944, launched 18 May 1945, commissioned 16 Oct 1945.

Served as training carrier after WWII. Decommissioned to reserve 30 June 1947. Recommissioned as ASW carrier 26 July 1951. Temporarily used for helicopter ASW trials. Decommissioned to reserve 31 Aug 1956. Redesignated as an aviation transport (AKV 19) 7 May 1959 while in reserve.

Reactivated as aircraft transport 23 August 1965 operated with civilian crew under MSTS control as T-AKV 19. Placed out of service 16 Oct 1969. Stricken for disposal 15 Sept 1970. Sold and scrapped in 1971.

DANFS History

Built by Todd-Pacific. Laid down 2 Jan 1945, launched 27 June 1945, commissioned 4 Dec 1945.

First served as a training carrier, then as ASW carrier. Operated with Marine Corps assault helicopters in 1953. Decommissioned to reserve 4 Aug 1955. Redesignated as an aviation transport (AKV 20) 7 May 1959 while in reserve. Stricken for disposal 1 Dec 1959. Sold and scrapped Hong Kong 9/60.

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Rabaul
CVE 121 - CVHE 121 - AKV 21
Photos: [No photo available]

DANFS History

Built by Todd-Pacific, completed at Commercial Iron Works. Laid down 2 Jan 1945, launched 14 July 1945. Accepted by USN 30 Aug 1946 but not commissioned immediately laid up in reserve. Redesignated as a helicopter escort carrier (CVHE 121) 12 June 1955 redesignated as an aviation transport (AKV 12) 7 May 1959, both while in reserve. Stricken for disposal 1 Sept 1971. Sold and scrapped in 1972.

DANFS History

Built by Todd-Pacific. Laid down 19 Feb 1945, launched 6 Aug 1945, commissioned 15 Jan 1946.

Used in various roles, including ASW and transport conducted trials of assault carrier (LPH) concept. Decommissioned to reserve 15 June 1954. Redesignated as an aviation transport (AKV 22) 7 May 1959 while in reserve. Stricken for disposal 1 April 1960. Sold and scrapped at Bilbao in 1960.

DANFS History

Built by Todd-Pacific. Laid down 20 March 1945, launched 5 Sept 1945. Accepted by USN 30 July 1946 but not commissioned immediately laid up in reserve.

Redesignated as a helicopter escort carrier (CVHE 123) 12 June 1955 redesignated as an aviation transport (AKV 23) 7 May 1959, both while in reserve. Stricken for disposal 1 June 1970. Sold and scrapped in 1971.

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Bastogne
CVE 124

Laid down at Todd-Pacific 2 April 1945 suspended 12 August 1945 and scrapped on the building slip.

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Eniwetok
CVE 125

Laid down at Todd-Pacific 20 April 1945 suspended 12 August 1945 and scrapped on the building slip.

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Lingayen
CVE 126

Laid down at Todd-Pacific 1 May 1945 suspended 12 August 1945 and scrapped on the building slip.

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Okinawa
CVE 127

Laid down at Todd-Pacific 22 May 1945 suspended 12 August 1945 and scrapped on the building slip.

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CVE 128 class escort aircraft carriers
Specifications not available

Concept/Program: An improved version of the Commencement Bay class, continuing the evolution of the CVE type. The entire class was cancelled at the end of the war.

Cancelled ships, no names assigned
CVE 128 through CVE 139

All cancelled 11 August 1945. None had been laid down.

CVE 128 Would have been built by Todd-Pacific.
CVE 129 Would have been built by Todd-Pacific.
CVE 130 Would have been built by Todd-Pacific.
CVE 131 Would have been built by Todd-Pacific.
CVE 132 Would have been built by Kaiser.
CVE 133 Would have been built by Kaiser.
CVE 134 Would have been built by Kaiser.
CVE 135 Would have been built by Kaiser.
CVE 136 Would have been built by Kaiser.
CVE 137 Would have been built by Kaiser.
CVE 138 Would have been built by Kaiser.
CVE 139 Would have been built by Kaiser.


Her conversion complete, she was recommissioned as ACV-28 on 19 September 1942. Carrying 77 P-40 Warhawks of the 33rd Fighter Group of the United States Army Air Forces, Chenango sailed on 23 October with the Torch assault force bound for North Africa, and on 10 November, flew off her aircraft to newly won Port Lyautey, French Morocco. [1] [3] She put into Casablanca on 13 November to refuel 21 destroyers before returning to Norfolk, Virginia, on 30 November, battling through a hurricane en route which caused extensive damage.

Quickly repaired, Chenango was underway for the Pacific by mid-December, possibly alongside USS Taylor (DD-468) as part of Task Force 13. Arriving at Nouméa on 18 January 1943, she joined the escort carrier group providing air cover for supply convoys supporting the invasion and occupation of the Solomon Islands. One of her air groups was sent to Henderson Field, Guadalcanal to give close support to U.S. Marine Corps forces ashore. One of Chenango ' s duties during this period was to stand sentry off the fiercely contested island. As part of her Solomons operations, Chenango ' s planes formed an air umbrella to escort to safety St. Louis and Honolulu after the cruisers were damaged in the Battle of Kolombangara on 13 July. Redesignated CVE-28 on 15 July, Chenango returned to Mare Island on 18 August for an overhaul, then acted as training carrier for new air groups until 19 October. She steamed from San Diego to join the Gilbert Islands invasion force at Espiritu Santo on 5 November. During the invasion of Tarawa from 20 November-8 December, her planes covered the advance of the attack force, bombed and strafed beaches ahead of the invading troops, and protected off-shore convoys. She returned to San Diego for another period of training duty.

Steaming from San Diego on 13 January 1944, Chenango supported the invasion landings on Roi, Kwajalein and Eniwetok in the Marshalls operation. After protecting the service group refueling fleet units engaged in the Palau strikes, Chenango arrived at Espiritu Santo on 7 April. She sortied for the landings at Aitape and Hollandia (currently known as Jayapura) (16 April–12 May), then joined Task Group 53.7 (TG㺵.7) for the invasion of the Marianas. Her planes crippled airfield installations, sank enemy shipping, and hammered harbor facilities on Pagan Island, as well as conducting valuable photographic reconnaissance on Guam. From 8 July, she joined in daily poundings of Guam, preparing for the island's invasion. She returned to Manus on 13 August to replenish and conduct training.

From 10–29 September, Chenango joined in the neutralization of enemy airfields in the Halmaheras in support of the invasion of Morotai, stepping-stone to the Philippines. After preparations at Manus, Chenango cleared on 12 October to conduct softening up strikes on Leyte in preparation for the invasion landings on 20 October. Chenango, and her sister ship Sangamon, were attacked by three Japanese planes on the afternoon of D-Day, and shot down them all, capturing one of the pilots. Sailing to Morotai to load new aircraft, Chenango was not in action waters during the Battle of Leyte Gulf, but returned on 28 October to provide replacement aircraft to her victorious sister escort carriers, who had held the Japanese fleet off from Leyte. The next day, she sailed for overhaul at Seattle, Washington until 9 February 1945.

After the overhaul period, she again sailed west, arriving at Tulagi in the Solomons on 4 March. Chenango conducted training, then sortied from Ulithi on 27 March for the invasion of Okinawa. She gave air cover in the feint landings on the southern tip of the island, then was assigned to neutralize the kamikaze bases in Sakashima Gunto. On 9 April, a crash-landing fighter started a raging fire among the strike-loaded aircraft on Chenango ' s deck. Skillful work by her crew saved the ship from serious damage and she remained in action off Okinawa until 11 June. After escorting a tanker convoy to San Pedro Bay, Chenango sailed on 26 July to join the logistics force for the 3rd Fleet, then engaged in the final offensive against Japan.


THANK YOU!

Please Take A Minute To Say Thank You To Your Guernsey Memorial Library Team

Guernsey Memorial Library serves as a focal point for community services and will provide high interest materials meeting patrons' current recreational, educational, and vocational needs.

Thank You

Guernsey Memorial Library serves as a focal point for community services and will provide high interest materials meeting patrons' current recreational, educational, and vocational needs, utilizing available current technology, with special emphasis on stimulating patrons' interest and appreciation for reading, literacy, and lifelong learning. Guernsey Library has a staff of 25 including two professional librarians: one Children's Librarian and the Library Director. Guernsey Library has a collection of approximately 106,849 items in the collection and over 130,000 circulations annually. Guernsey Library was chartered as a School district library in December 1973. The building and property are owned by the Norwich City School district. Guernsey Library is a member of the Four County Library System.

Drop them a note to say "thanks" for making this archive possible!

About

The Guernsey Memorial Library was first housed in the Guernsey Homestead. This home is not only the oldest house, but was also the first frame house built in Norwich. Erected in 1799 by Deacon Elisha Smith, it was sold to Peter B. Garnsey in 1804. In 1807 when Peter and one of his neighbors donated two acres of land for the court house and parks, the Garnsey House was moved to the Library's present location.

The home was occupied by the family until 1901 when it became public property by the terms of the will of Mrs. William B. Guernsey. The legal title to the property was passed on to the Board of Education of Union Free School District Number One of the Town of Norwich.

The terms stated &ldquoThat they shall take and forever keep and maintain the property known as the Guernsey Homestead. . . For the establishment and maintenance of a free public library and park. . . and to be forever held by said Corporation and it&rsquos successors for such purpose and no other and to be known and designated the Guernsey Homestead Memorial Library. . ."

In 1967 the Guernsey Homestead was razed for safety reasons. The new library was built on the same site and dedicated March 8, 1969. The Park was dedicated on August 1, 1982.


Chenango AO-31 - History

Chenango Land Trust History

The 1992 Chenango County Environmental Management Council had a Land Use subcommittee, the members of which became aware of the growing Land Trust movement, and they decided to form a Land Trust to serve Chenango County. All the members of the Land Use Committee were excited and became the founding members of the Chenango Land Trust. Assistance from neighboring Finger Lakes Land Trust enabled the Chenango group to organize with By-laws, Articles of Incorporation, Mission Statement and all the necessary officers.

By the time all the legal obligations and document filings were satisfied, two years had passed and the Chenango Land Trust finally achieved IRS 501(c) (3) status as a charitable not-for-profit corporation in February, 1994.

Chenango Land Trust History Timeline

1992 - Land Trust idea first conceived by Chenango EMC Land Use Subcommittee members

1994 - Chenango Land Trust, Inc. becomes a New York State Corporation

1994 - IRS provisional charitable non-profit status awarded

1996 - Educational Program: Exploring Chenango County established through BOCES Adult Education

1996 - First Land Steward Awards presented

1997 - First Conservation Easement acquired, Town of Pharsalia

1999 - Chenango Land Trust produces a video on protecting land with conservation easements.

1999 - Chenango Land Trust awarded permanent IRS charitable non-profit status

2002 - McCall’s Pond property acquired in the Town of Preston

2004 - Conservation Easements acquired, Town of Sanford and Town of Union

2005 - Conservation Easement acquired, Town of Smithville Flats

2006 - Conservation Easement acquired, Town of Greene

2007 - Conservation Easement acquired, Town of Greene

2008 - Conservation Easement acquired, Town of Maine

2010 - Conservation Easements acquired, Town of Sherburne and Town of Columbus


Watch the video: Top 10 things to know about Amtrak. This is a re-upload. (July 2022).


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