History Podcasts

USS Rudyerd Bay - History

USS Rudyerd Bay - History


We are searching data for your request:

Forums and discussions:
Manuals and reference books:
Data from registers:
Wait the end of the search in all databases.
Upon completion, a link will appear to access the found materials.

Rudyerd Bay

(CVE-81: dp. 7,800, 1. 512'3", b. 65'; ew. 108'1"; dr. 22'6"; s. 19 k., cpl. 860, a. 1 5", 16 40mm., 20 20mm., dct 28; cl. Casablanca; T. S4-S2-BB3)

Rudyerd Bay (CVE-81) was laid down under Maritime Commission contract (MC hull 1118) on 24 October 1943 by the Kaiser Shipbuilding Co., Vancouver, Wash.; launched 12 January 1944, sponsored by Mrs. Scott E. Peck, acquired by the Navy on 25 February 1944, and commissioned the same day, Capt. C. S. Smiley in command.

Following shakedown off southern California, Rudyerd Bay ferried planes to Espiritu Santo in April and May; conducted qualification exercises off California into July; then made another ferry run, this time to Maluro. On her return, she embarked Composite Squadron 77 (VC-77) and, on 8 August, she again headed west. At Eniwetok, she joined TG 30.8, the fast carrier forces' replenishment group, with which she arrived at Manus on the 31st.

During early September, she covered the replenishment group as the 3d Fleet supported the Palau campaign. In October, she continued that cover as strikes against the Philippines began. On the 18th, she took on suryivors of Houston and transported them to Ulithi, whence, in November, she resumed covering operations which continued into the new year.

On 29 December, Rudyerd Bay, with Ne)u~nta Bay (CVE-74) tankers, and other ships, departed Ulithi. In the Philippine Sea until 10 January 1945, the replenishment grouD shifted to the South China Sea as the fast carriers continued support of the Lingayen assault and conducted strikes against enemy installations and shipping from Indoehina to Formosa. On the 22d, they retired, via the Sulu and Mindanao Seas and Leyte Gulf, to Ulithi.

Rudyerd Bay remained at Ulithi until 10 February. She then proceeded to Saipan to prepare for the assault on Iwo Jima. Departing the Marianas in TG 51.17, she provided air cover for the troop transports en route to the Voleano Islands, 16 to 18 February. On the 18th, she joined TG 52.2 and, from then until 8 March, operated to the east of Iwo Jima as VC-77 flew support missions over the contested island and antisubmarine patrols over the surrounding waters.

Anehored at Ulithi from 11 to 20 March, Rudyerd Bay, with VC-96 now embarked, got underway for the Ryukyus in TU 52.1.2 on the 21st. On the 25th, she arrived at her position 60 miles to the south of Okinawa and began launching strikes against enemy positions on Kerama Retto and on Okinawa. With the exceptions of 1 April and 8 April, VC-96 flew daily support missions until 17 April. On 13, 14, and 15 Anril, the squadron target was shifted from Okinawa Gunto to Sakishima Gunto. On 17 April, Rudyerd Bay rotated to TG 50.8. For the next 10 days, she provided air cover for that group, then returned to TG 52.1 and resumed support missions for the troops fighting ashore. On 8 May, she again joined TG 50.8, which she covered until retiring from the Ryukyus on the 20th. By that time, VC-96 had flown 1,257 missions in support of the Okinawa offensive.

Rudyerd Bay arrived at Guam on the 23d, detached VC-96 and embarked VC 85 as passengers for transport back to the United States.

By the end of July, the escort carrier had completed a shipyard overhaul and had been reassigned to plane ferry duty. On 1 August, she departed Alameda for the Marshalls. On the 14th, hostilities ceased. Rudyerd Bay continued on, discharged cargo and passengers at Eniwetok, then proceeded to Ulithi and the Philippines, whence she moved VC-33 to Okinawa. There she embarked another squadron for the voyage back to California.

On 8 October, she arrived at San Francisco, underwent repairs and alterations to enable her to carry troops, then joined the "Magic Carpet" fleet. Into the new year, she brought veterans of the Pacific war back to the United States. On 23 January 1946, she completed her last transpacific run; and, on 18 February, she departed California for the east coast. Transiting the Panama Canal on the 28th, she offloaded aircraft at Jacksonville in early March, and proceeded to Boston to begin inactivation.

Decommissioned 11 June 1946, Rudyerd Bay, redesigated CVU-81 on 12 June 1955, and AKV-29 in 1959, remained in the Atlantic Reserve Fleet, berthed at Boston, until struck from the Navy list on 1 August 1959. In January 1960 she was sold to Cantieri Navali Santa Maria, Genoa, Italy.

Rudyerd Bay (CVE-81) earned five battle stars during World War II.


Following shakedown off southern California, Rudyerd Bay ferried planes to Espiritu Santo in April and May then she conducted qualification exercises off California into July. After this, she made another ferry run, this time to Majuro from 20 July to 26 July, escorted by O'Flaherty. On her return, she embarked Composite Squadron 77 (VC-77) and, on 8 August, she again headed west. At Eniwetok, she joined Task Group 30.8 (TG㺞.8), the fast carrier forces' replenishment group, with which she arrived at Manus on 31 August.

During early September, she covered the replenishment group as the Third Fleet supported the Palau campaign. In October, she continued that cover as strikes against the Philippines began. On 18 October, she took on survivors of the Houston, transported them to Ulithi whence in November, she resumed covering operations which continued into the new year.

On 29 December, Rudyerd Bay, with Nehenta Bay, tankers, and other ships, departed Ulithi. In the Philippine Sea until 10 January 1945, the replenishment group shifted to the South China Sea as the fast carriers continued support of the Lingayen assault and conducted strikes against enemy installations and shipping from Indochina to Formosa. On 22 January, they retired, via the Sulu and Mindanao Seas and Leyte Gulf, to Ulithi.

Rudyerd Bay remained at Ulithi until 10 February. She then proceeded to Saipan to prepare for the assault on Iwo Jima. Departing the Marianas in TG㺳.17, she provided air cover for the troop transports en route to the Volcano Islands, from 16 February to 18 February. On the 18th, she joined TG㺴.2 and from then until 8 March, operated to the east of Iwo Jima as VC-77 flew support missions over the contested island and antisubmarine patrols over the surrounding waters.

Anchored at Ulithi from 11 March to 20 March, Rudyerd Bay, with VC-96 now embarked, got underway for the Ryukyus in Task Unit 52.1.2 (TU 52.1.2) on 21 March. On 25 March, she arrived at her position 60 miles to the south of Okinawa and began launching strikes against enemy positions on Kerama Retto and on Okinawa. With the exceptions of 1 April and 8 April, VC-96 flew daily support missions until 17 April. On 13 April, 14 April, and 15 April, the squadron target was shifted from Okinawa Gunto to Sakishima Gunto. On 17 April, Rudyerd Bay rotated to TG㺲.8. For the next 10 days, she provided air cover for that group, then returned to TG㺴.1 and resumed support missions for the troops fighting ashore. On 8 May, she again joined TG㺲.8, which she covered until retiring from the Ryukyus on 20 May. By that time, VC-96 had flown 1,257 missions in support of the Okinawa offensive.

Rudyerd Bay arrived at Guam on 23 May, detached VC-96, and embarked VC-85 as passengers for transport back to the United States.

By the end of July, the escort carrier had completed a shipyard overhaul and had been reassigned to plane ferry duty. On 1 August, she departed Alameda for the Marshalls. On 14 August, hostilities ceased. Rudyerd Bay continued on, discharged cargo and passengers at Eniwetok, then proceeded to Ulithi and the Philippines, whence she moved VC-33 to Okinawa. There, she embarked another squadron for the voyage back to California.

On 8 October, she arrived at San Francisco, underwent repairs and alterations to enable her to carry troops, then joined the "Magic-Carpet" fleet. Into the new year, she brought veterans of the Pacific war back to the United States. On 23 January 1946, she completed her last trans-Pacific run and on 18 February, she departed California for the east coast. Transiting the Panama Canal on 28 February, she off-loaded aircraft at Jacksonville, Florida, in early March, and proceeded to Boston to begin inactivation.

Decommissioned on 11 June 1946, Rudyerd Bay, redesignated CVU-81 on 12 June 1955, and AKV-29 in 1959, remained in the Atlantic Reserve Fleet, berthed at Boston, Massachusetts, until struck from the Navy List on 1 August 1959. In January 1960, she was sold to Cantieri Navali Santa Maria, Genoa, Italy, for scrapping.


USS Rudyerd Bay - History

USS Rudyerd Bay

Rudyerd Bay (CVE-81) earned five battle stars during World War II.

USS Rudyerd Bay (CVE-81) was a Casablanca-class escort carrier of the United States Navy. She was laid down under Maritime Commission contract (MC hull 1118) on 24 October 1943 by the Kaiser Shipbuilding Company, in Vancouver, Washington launched on 12 January 1944, sponsored by Mrs. Scott E. Peck acquired by the Navy on 25 February 1944, and commissioned the same day, with Captain C. S. Smiley in command.

Service history
Following shakedown off southern California, Rudyerd Bay ferried planes to Espiritu Santo in April and May then she conducted qualification exercises off California into July. After this, she made another ferry run, this time to Majuro from 20 July to 26 July, escorted by O'Flaherty. On her return, she embarked Composite Squadron 77 (VC-77) and, on 8 August, she again headed west. At Eniwetok, she joined Task Group 30.8 (TG 30.8), the fast carrier forces' replenishment group, with which she arrived at Manus on 31 August.

Would you like to upload your Rudyerd Bay photos to our archives?
Click here to start the process!

During early September, she covered the replenishment group as the Third Fleet supported the Palau campaign. In October, she continued that cover as strikes against the Philippines began. On 18 October, she took on survivors of the Houston, transported them to Ulithi whence in November, she resumed covering operations which continued into the new year.

On 29 December, Rudyerd Bay, with Nehenta Bay, tankers, and other ships, departed Ulithi. In the Philippine Sea until 10 January 1945, the replenishment group shifted to the South China Sea as the fast carriers continued support of the Lingayen assault and conducted strikes against enemy installations and shipping from Indochina to Formosa. On 22 January, they retired, via the Sulu and Mindanao Seas and Leyte Gulf, to Ulithi.

Rudyerd Bay remained at Ulithi until 10 February. She then proceeded to Saipan to prepare for the assault on Iwo Jima. Departing the Marianas in TG 51.17, she provided air cover for the troop transports en route to the Volcano Islands, from 16 February to 18 February. On the 18th, she joined TG 52.2 and from then until 8 March, operated to the east of Iwo Jima as VC-77 flew support missions over the contested island and antisubmarine patrols over the surrounding waters.

Anchored at Ulithi from 11 March to 20 March, Rudyerd Bay, with VC-96 now embarked, got underway for the Ryukyus in Task Unit 52.1.2 (TU 52.1.2) on 21 March. On 25 March, she arrived at her position 60 miles to the south of Okinawa and began launching strikes against enemy positions on Kerama Retto and on Okinawa. With the exceptions of 1 April and 8 April, VC-96 flew daily support missions until 17 April. On 13 April, 14 April, and 15 April, the squadron target was shifted from Okinawa Gunto to Sakishima Gunto. On 17 April, Rudyerd Bay rotated to TG 50.8. For the next 10 days, she provided air cover for that group, then returned to TG 52.1 and resumed support missions for the troops fighting ashore. On 8 May, she again joined TG 50.8, which she covered until retiring from the Ryukyus on 20 May. By that time, VC-96 had flown 1,257 missions in support of the Okinawa offensive.

Rudyerd Bay arrived at Guam on 23 May, detached VC-96, and embarked VC-85 as passengers for transport back to the United States.

By the end of July, the escort carrier had completed a shipyard overhaul and had been reassigned to plane ferry duty. On 1 August, she departed Alameda for the Marshalls. On 14 August, hostilities ceased. Rudyerd Bay continued on, discharged cargo and passengers at Eniwetok, then proceeded to Ulithi and the Philippines, whence she moved VC-33 to Okinawa. There, she embarked another squadron for the voyage back to California.

On 8 October, she arrived at San Francisco, underwent repairs and alterations to enable her to carry troops, then joined the "Magic-Carpet" fleet. Into the new year, she brought veterans of the Pacific war back to the United States. On 23 January 1946, she completed her last trans-Pacific run and on 18 February, she departed California for the east coast. Transiting the Panama Canal on 28 February, she off-loaded aircraft at Jacksonville, Florida, in early March, and proceeded to Boston to begin inactivation.

Decommissioned on 11 June 1946, Rudyerd Bay, redesignated CVU-81 on 12 June 1955, and AKV-29 in 1959, remained in the Atlantic Reserve Fleet, berthed at Boston, Massachusetts, until struck from the Navy List on 1 August 1959. In January 1960, she was sold to Cantieri Navali Santa Maria, Genoa, Italy, for scrapping.


USS Rudyerd Bay (CVE-81)

USS Rudyerd Bay (CVE-81) was laid down under Maritime Commission contract (MC hull 1118) on 24 October 1943 by the Kaiser Shipbuilding Co., Vancouver, Wash. launched 12 January 1944 sponsored by Mrs. Scott E. Peck acquired by the Navy on 25 February 1944 and commissioned the same day, Capt. C. S. Smiley in command.

Following shakedown off southern California, Rudyerd Bay ferried planes to Espiritu Santo in April and May conducted qualification exercises off California into July then made another ferry run, this time to Majuro. On her return, she embarked Composite Squadron 77 (VC-77) and, on 8 August, she again headed west. At Eniwetok, she joined TG 30.8, the fast carrier forces' replenishment group, with which she arrived at Manus on the 31st.

During early September, she covered the replenishment group as the 3d Fleet supported the Palau campaign. In October, she continued that cover as strikes against the Philippines began. On the 18th, she took on survivors of Houston (CL-81), transported them to Ulithi, whence, in November, she resumed covering operations which continued into the new year.

On 29 December, Rudyerd Bay, with Nehenta Bay (CVE-74), tankers, and other ships, departed Ulithi. In the Philippine Sea until 10 January 1945, the replenishment group shifted to the South China Sea as the fast carriers continued support of the Lingayen assault and conducted strikes against enemy installations and shipping from Indochina to Formosa. On the 22d, they retired, via the Sulu and Mindanao Seas and Leyte Gulf, to Ulithi.

Rudyerd Bay remained at Ulithi until 10 February. She then proceeded to Saipan to prepare for the assault on Iwo Jima. Departing the Marianas in TG 51.17, she provided air cover for the troop transports en route to the Volcano Islands, 16 to 18 February. On the 18th, she joined TG 52.2 and, from then until 8 March, operated to the east of Iwo Jima as VC-77 flew support missions over the contested island and antisubmarine patrols over the surrounding waters.

Anchored at Ulithi from 11 to 20 March, Rudyerd Bay, with VC-96 now embarked, got underway for the Ryukyus in TU 52.1.2 on the 21st. On the 25th, she arrived at her position 60 miles to the south of Okinawa and began launching strikes against enemy positions on Kerama Retto and on Okinawa. With the exceptions of 1 April and 8 April, VC-96 flew daily support missions until 17 April. On 13, 14, and 15 April, the squadron target was shifted from Okinawa Gunto to Sakishima Gunto. On 17 April, Rudyerd Bay rotated to TG 50.8. For the next 10 days, she provided air cover for that group, then returned to TG 52.1 and resumed support missions for the troops fighting ashore. On 8 May, she again joined TG 50.8, which she covered until retiring from the Ryukyus on the 20th. By that time, VC-96 had flown 1,257 missions in support of the Okinawa offensive.

Rudyerd Bay arrived at Guam on the 23d, detached VC-96, and embarked VC-85 as passengers for transport back to the United States.

By the end of July, the escort carrier had completed a shipyard overhaul and had been reassigned to plane ferry duty. On 1 August, she departed Alameda for the Marshalls. On the 14th, hostilities ceased. Rudyerd Bay continued on, discharged cargo and passengers at Eniwetok, then proceeded to Ulithi and the Philippines, whence she moved VC-33 to Okinawa. There, she embarked another squadron for the voyage back to California.

On 8 October, she arrived at San Francisco, underwent repairs and alterations to enable her to carry troops, then joined the "Magic-Carpet" fleet. Into the new year, she brought veterans of the Pacific war back to the United States. On 23 January 1946, she completed her last transpacific run and, on 18 February, she departed California for the east coast. Transiting the Panama Canal on the 28th, she offloaded aircraft at Jacksonville in early March, and proceeded to Boston to begin inactivation.

Decommissioned 11 June 1946, Rudyerd Bay, redesignated CVU-81 on 12 June 1955, and AKV-29 in 1959, remained in the Atlantic Reserve Fleet, berthed at Boston, until struck from the Navy list on 1 August 1959. In January 1960, she was sold to Cantieri Navali Santa Maria, Genoa, Italy.

Rudyerd Bay (CVE-81) earned five battle stars during World War II.


Chaumont (AP-5): Photographs

Click on the small photograph to prompt a larger view of the same image.

At Balboa, Canal Zone, circa 1923.
The original post card is postmarked at San Diego on 23 October 1923. The sender wrote to his sister in Michigan "am sending you a picture of the buggy I am riding in. I have spent twenty six days on this boat."

Photo No. None
Source: Shipscribe.

Moored to a landing with troops on deck in the 1920s or 1930s.

Photo No. NH 55090
Source: U.S. Naval History and Heritage Command.

Underway during the 1920s.

Photo No. NH 99602
Source: U.S. Naval History and Heritage Command.

Dressed with flags during the 1920s or 1930s.
The enclosed ends of the pilot house were a recognition feature for this ship.

Photo No. NH 83456
Source: U.S. Naval History and Heritage Command.

Alongside a pier circa the 1930s.
The open bridge above the pilot house has been partially enclosed, as in other auxiliaries during the 1930s.

Photo No. NH 99601
Source: U.S. Naval History and Heritage Command

At the Norfolk Navy Yard on 4 October 1941 with her armament of 4-3"/50 guns installed.
Behind her is USS Texas (BB-35), while the British carrier in the foreground is probably HMS Illustrious , at the yard for battle damage repairs.

Photo No. 19-N-25845
Source: U.S. Naval History and Heritage Command.

Photographed circa early 1942.

Photo No. 19-N-28034
Source: U.S. National Archives, RG-19-LCM

At Kodiak, Alaska, on 11 May 1943.
Note the new radar mast over the bridge.

Photo No. 80-G-79719
Source: U.S. National Archives, RG-80-G

Photographed in the Pacific in 1944 or 1945 from USS Rudyerd Bay (CVE-81).

Photo No. 80-G-369567
Source: Shipscribe.

Probably shown returning to San Francisco Bay for the last time in April 1946.
Note the postwar hospital ship markings and the homeward-bound pennant on the mainmast.


Frank James Peterson

LIEUTENANT COMMANDER FRANK JAMES PETERSON was the son of Frank H. and Martha Peterson. His father was merchant sea captain, was born in Maine of an old Maine family in 1875. His mother was born in Scotland in 1881 and came to the USA in 1897. The Petersons married in 1905. Frank Peterson was born in Pennsylvania in 1905, his brother John a year later. By the late 1920s the family had purchased a house at 716 Richey Avenue in Collingswood NJ. Frank Peterson graduated from Collingswood High School in 1929, where he had played on the school football team in 1926 and 1927. He had entered service in the United States Naval Reserve around 1940, probably through the air training offered by the Civil Aeronautics Training program, and had received training at Annapolis MD and Pensacola FL.

Lieutenant Commander Frank Peterson was awarded the Air Medal in 1943. It was reported in the August 24, 1943 edition of the Camden Courier-Post that he was awarded the Air Medal, and was senior flying officer aboard the USS SAN FRANCISCO.

Commanding Composite Sqaudron 77 (VC-77), Lt. Commander Peterson embarked on the escort carrier USS RUDYERD BAY CVE-81 in August of 1944 at the island of Majuro. On 8 August, RUDYERD BAY headed west. At Eniwetok, she joined TG 30.8, the fast carrier forces' replenishment group, with which she arrived at Manus on the 31st.

During early September, RUDYERD BAY and VC-77 covered the replenishment group as the 3rd Fleet supported the Palau campaign. In October, VC-77's aircraft continued that cover as strikes against the Philippines began. On the 18th, RUDYERD BAY took on wounded sailors from torpedoed HOUSTON (CL 81), transported them to Ulithi, whence, in November, she resumed covering operations which continued into the new year.

On 29 December, with NEHENTA BAY (CVE 74), tankers, and other ships, RUDYERD BAY departed Ulithi. In the Philippine Sea until 10 January 1945, the replenishment group shifted to the South China Sea as the fast carriers continued support of the Lingayen assault and conducted strikes against enemy installations and shipping from Indochina to Formosa. On the 22nd, they retired, via the Sulu and Mindanao Seas and Leyte Gulf, to Ulithi.

RUDYERD BAY remained at Ulithi until 10 February. She then proceeded to Saipan to prepare for the assault on Iwo Jima. Departing the Marianas in TG 51.17, she provided air cover for the troop transports en route to the Volcano Islands, 16 to 18 February.

On February 19, 1945 Lieutenant Commander Frank Peterson was leading attack Squadron VC77 as commanding officer on one of the first aerial attacks on Iwo Jima after the invasion when his plane (TBM-1C Avenger, BuNo 73254) was hit, presumably by anti-aircraft fire, as it began its attack run. His plane hit the water, and sank immediately.


World War II Database

Did you enjoy this photograph or find this photograph helpful? If so, please consider supporting us on Patreon. Even $1 per month will go a long way! Thank you.

Share this photograph with your friends:

  • » 1,102 biographies
  • » 334 events
  • » 38,814 timeline entries
  • » 1,144 ships
  • » 339 aircraft models
  • » 191 vehicle models
  • » 354 weapon models
  • » 120 historical documents
  • » 226 facilities
  • » 464 book reviews
  • » 27,602 photos
  • » 359 maps

"The raising of that flag on Suribachi means a Marine Corps for the next 500 years."

James Forrestal, Secretary of the Navy, 23 Feb 1945

The World War II Database is founded and managed by C. Peter Chen of Lava Development, LLC. The goal of this site is two fold. First, it is aiming to offer interesting and useful information about WW2. Second, it is to showcase Lava's technical capabilities.


Авіаносець «Радьєд Бей» був закладений 24 жовтня 1943 року на верфі Kaiser Shipyards у Ванкувері. Спущений на воду 12 січня 1944 року, вступив у стрій 24 лютого 1944 року.

Після вступу в стрій протягом вересня-грудня 1944 року «Радьєд Бей» здійснював перевезення літаків на Тихоокеанський ТВД для потреб тактичного з'єднання TF-58/38. Далі авіаносець брав участь в десантних операціях на Іодзіму (лютий-березень 1945 року) та Окінаву (квітень-червень 1945 року).

Після закінчення бойових дій корабель перевозив американських солдатів та моряків на батьківщину (операція «Magic Carpet»).

11 червня 1946 року авіаносець «Радьєд Бей» був виведений в резерв. 12 червня 1955 року він був перекласифікований в допоміжний авіаносець CVU-81, а у 1959 році - в допоміжний авіатранспорт AKV-29. 1 серпня 1959 року корабель був виключений зі списків флоту і наступного року зданий на злам.


Misty Fjords and Wilderness Explorer Cruise from Ketchikan

Voyage into Behm Canal aboard a comfortable catamaran, surrounded by the pristine beauty of Misty Fjords. Along the way you’ll stop to view an active bald eagle’s nest, a Tlingit pictograph, and New Eddystone Rock an immense volcanic spire rising from the emerald sea. Enjoy views of Rudyerd Bay, an ice-carved masterpiece deep within the Monument. On the cruise back to Ketchikan, watch for whales, seals, eagles, and other wildlife. You will also have the opportunity to experience culture and history presented by a Native story-teller and artist, or enjoy a tour related video presentation.

What's Included

Required at Booking

Cruise ship or hotel information in Ketchikan.


World War II Edit

After a shakedown cruise along the west coast, Manila Bay sailed for Pearl Harbor on 20 November and returned a load of damaged planes to San Diego on 4 December. After training exercises, with Composite Squadron 7 (VC-7) embarked, she departed Hawaii on 3 January 1944. A week later she embarked Rear Admiral Ralph Davidson and became flagship for Carrier Division 24. Joining Task Force 52 (TF 52), she sortied 22 January for the invasion of the Marshall Islands. Between 31 January-6 February, she launched air and antisubmarine patrols as well as dozens of combat missions. Her planes bombed and strafed enemy positions from Kwajalein Island north to Bigej Island and destroyed ammunition dumps and ground installations. She remained in the Marshalls during the next month and extended her operations late in February first to Eniwetok and then to Majuro.

Departing Majuro on 7 March, Manila Bay reached Espiritu Santo on the 12th. Three days later she joined TF 37 for airstrikes and surface bombardments against Kavieng, New Ireland on 19–20 March. During the next month she cruised between the Solomons and the Bismarck Archipelago supporting the protracted offensive to neutralize the Archipelago and the Japanese fortress at Rabaul. Thence, on 19 April she steamed so that her planes could attack enemy positions on New Guinea.

New Guinea Edit

American naval and ground forces began a three–pronged invasion along northern New Guinea at Aitape, Hollandia, and Tanahmerah Bay on 22 April. During and after the invasion Manila Bay launched protective air patrols and sent fighters and bombers to attack and destroy Japanese installations in the Aitape area. On 4 May she returned to Manus Island where Rear Admiral Felix Stump relieved Admiral Davidson as Commander, Carrier Division 24. Admiral Stump transferred his flag to Corregidor on 6 May, and the following day Manila Bay sailed for overhaul at Pearl Harbor where she arrived on 18 May.

After loading 37 Army Republic P-47 Thunderbolts of the Army Air Forces' 73rd Fighter Squadron, 318th Fighter Group, Manila Bay sailed on 5 June for the Mariana Islands. Steaming via Eniwetok, she reached the eastern approaches to Saipan on 19 June. During the next 4 days, she remained east of the embattled island as ships and planes of the Fast Carrier Task Force repulsed the Japanese Fleet in the Battle of the Philippine Sea, and inflicted staggering losses on the enemy, crippling the Imperial Navy’s air strength permanently.

On 23 June, Manila Bay came under enemy air attack during refueling operations east of Saipan. Four Aichi D3A Val dive bombers attacked her from dead ahead, dropping their bombs which exploded wide to port. As a precautionary and rather unusual move which Raymond A. Spruance later characterized as "commendable initiative", Manila Bay launched four of the P-47 Thunderbolts she was ferrying to fly protective CAP until radar screens were clear of contacts. The Army fighters then flew to Saipan, their intended destination. Manila Bay launched the remaining planes the next day and returned to Eniwetok, arriving on 27 June. After embarking 207 wounded troops, she departed on 1 July, touched Pearl Harbor on the 8th, and reached San Diego on 16 July.

Manila Bay returned to Pearl on 31 August. Two days later, Captain Fitzhugh Lee III took command of the veteran carrier, and after embarking VC-80, Manila Bay departed on 15 September as a unit of Carrier Division 24 (CarDiv 24). Steaming via Eniwetok, she reached Manus 3 October and began final preparations for the invasion of the Philippines at Leyte Gulf.

Leyte Gulf Edit

Assigned to the Task Group 77.4 (TG 77.4), Manila Bay departed on 12 October for waters east of the Philippines. Prior to the invasion, her planes pounded enemy ground targets on Leyte, Samar, and Cebu Islands. She launched ground support, spotting, and air cover strikes during the amphibious assaults on 20 October, and she sent bombers and fighters to support ground forces during the critical first few days at Leyte.

As Manila Bay cruised to the east of Leyte Gulf with other carriers of Admiral Stump's "Taffy 2" (Task Unit 77.4.2, TU 77.4.2), powerful Japanese naval forces converged upon the Philippines and launched a three-pronged offensive to drive the Americans from Leyte. In a series of masterful and coordinated surface attacks, an American battleship, cruiser, and destroyer force met and destroyed enemy ships in the Battle of Surigao Strait early on 25 October. Surviving Japanese ships retreated into the Mindanao Sea pursued by destroyers, PT boats, and after sunrise by carrier-based bombers and fighters.

Manila Bay sent an eight-plane strike against ground targets on Leyte before sunrise subsequently, these planes bombed and strafed retiring enemy ships southwest of Panaon Island. A second strike about midmorning pounded the cruiser Mogami. In the meantime, however, Manila Bay turned her planes against a more immediate threat: the enemy attack against ships of Taffy 3.

Samar Edit

A running battle ensued between the escort carriers of Rear Adm. Clifton Sprague's Taffy 3 and the larger, vastly more powerful surface ships of Vice Admiral Takeo Kurita's Center Force. The self-sacrificing attacks by American destroyers and destroyer escorts, and the prompt, aggressive, and unceasing torpedo, bomb, and strafing strikes by planes from Taffy 2 and Taffy 3 contributed to the American victory against great odds in the Battle off Samar.

Manila Bay launched two airstrikes during the enemy pursuit of Taffy 3 and two more as the Japanese retreated. At 08:30, she sent four torpedo-laden Grumman TBM Avengers and a seven-plane escort to join the desperate fight. Three launched torpedoes at a battleship, probably Yamato, but they missed. The fourth plane launched her torpedo at a heavy cruiser, most likely Chikuma. It hit the ship to starboard near the fantail, forcing her out of control. The second strike an hour later by two Avengers resulted in one torpedo hit on the portside amidships against an unidentified battleship.

As the Japanese ships broke off attack and circled off Samar, the airstrikes continued. At 11:20, Manila Bay launched four Avengers, carrying 500 pound bombs, and four bombers from other carriers. Escorted by General Motors FM-2 Wildcats and led by Commander R. L. Fowler, they soon joined planes from other Taffy carriers. Shortly after 12:30, some 70 planes surprised and attacked the retiring Center Force, strafing and bombing through intense antiaircraft fire. Manila Bay ' s bombers made a hit and two near misses on the lead battleship, probably Kongō or Haruna. Manila Bay launched her final strike at 12:45, strafing destroyers and getting two hits on a cruiser.

Later that afternoon, Manila Bay ' s CAP intercepted a Japanese bomber-fighter strike about 50 miles north of Taffy 2. Her four fighters broke up the enemy formation, and with reinforcements drove off the attackers before they reached the carriers. Her planes continued to attack enemy ships the following day. Laden with rockets and bombs, one of her Avengers scored two hits on the cruiser Kinu and several rocket hits on the destroyer Uranami. Both ships sank about noon in the Visayan Sea after numerous air attacks.

Manila Bay resumed air operations in support of Leyte ground forces on 27 October. During ground support and air cover missions, her planes shot down an Aichi D3A "Val" on 27 October and bagged two Nakajima Ki-43 "Oscars" on 29 October. Late on 30 October she sailed for the Admiralty Islands, arriving at Manus on 4 November.

Mindoro Edit

After steaming to Kossol Passage late in November, Manila Bay departed on 10 December to provide air cover for the Mindoro invasion convoys. The task force entered Mindanao Sea early on 13 December. Late that afternoon in the Sulu Sea south of Negros, they encountered enemy aircraft. The fighter cover shot down or repulsed most of the attackers. Accurate fire from Manila Bay shot down one kamikaze. A second kamikaze hit the destroyer Haraden.

During and after the Mindoro landings on 15 December, Manila Bay sent her planes on ground support and air cover missions. As troops poured ashore, more kamikazes attempted to break the air cover and crash into ships of the covering and carrier group. The few that escaped the combat air patrols were either shot down or driven off by accurate antiaircraft fire. Manila Bay helped down three of the raiders and her fighters knocked out two more. After recovering her planes on 16 December, she sailed in convoy via Surigao Strait and reached Kossol on 19 December.

After a trip to Manus, Manila Bay sortied New Year's Day 1945 with ships of the Luzon Attack Force. With five other escort carriers she provided air cover for Vice Admiral Jesse B. Oldendorf's Bombardment and Fire Support Group, and direct air support for Vice Admiral Daniel E. Barbey's San Fabian Attack Force.

The task groups steamed via Surigao Strait and the Mindanao Sea into the Sulu Sea where they turned north for the Mindoro Strait. Enemy nuisance and suicide raids began in earnest on 4 January and despite the tight air cover provided by CVE aircraft, a kamikaze crashed into the flight deck of Ommaney Bay causing her to sink.

Lingayen Gulf Edit

The enemy air attacks intensified on 5 January. Patrolling fighters broke up morning and early afternoon strikes, shooting down numerous raiders. At 16:50, a third attack sent all hands to general quarters. Vectored CAP shot down several enemy planes and anti-aircraft fire accounted for others. Three planes got through to the cruisers Louisville, the destroyer Stafford, and the Australian cruiser Australia.

Kamikaze strike Edit

Just before 17:50, two kamikazes dove at Manila Bay from the portside. [1] The first plane hit the flight deck to starboard abaft the bridge, causing fires on the flight and hangar decks, destroying radar transmitting spaces, and wiping out all communications. The second plane, aimed for the bridge, missed the island close aboard to starboard and hit the sea off the fantail. [1]

Firefighting parties promptly brought the blazes under control, including those of two fueled and burning torpedo planes in the hangar deck. Within 24 hours, she resumed limited air operations. [1] Most repairs to her damaged electrical and communication circuits were completed by 9 January, when the amphibious invasion in Lingayen Gulf got underway.

Manila Bay had 14 men killed and 52 wounded, but by 10 January she resumed full duty in support of the Lingayen Gulf operations. In addition to providing air cover for the task force, her planes flew 104 sorties against targets in western Luzon. They gave effective close support for ground troops at Lingayen and San Fabian and bombed, rocketed, and strafed gun emplacements, buildings, truck convoys, and troop concentrations from Lingayen to Baguio.

Manila Bay departed in convoy late on 17 January. Steaming via Leyte, Ulithi, and Pearl Harbor, she arrived San Diego on 15 February. Battle damage repairs completed late in April, with VC-72 embarked she trained in Hawaiian waters until sailing for the western Pacific on 24 May. She closed the coast of Okinawa on 13 June and during the next week launched rocket and strafing strikes in the Ryukyu Islands. She departed for the Marianas on 20 June and operated out of Guam and Eniwetok during the closing weeks of the war.

Manila Bay steamed to the Aleutians in mid-August. As a unit of TF 44, she departed Adak Island on 31 August to support occupation operations in northern Japan. From 7–12 September her planes carried out photographic and reconnaissance missions over northern Honshū and southern Hokkaidō and dropped emergency supplies at POW camps. She returned to Pearl Harbor on 24 September, unloaded her aircraft, and steamed to the Marshall Islands carrying replacement troops.

Post-war Edit

Assigned to "Magic Carpet" duty, Manila Bay embarked 1,031 veterans at Eniwetok, and from 6–18 October sailed to San Francisco. In November, the carrier aided the disabled Boeing 314 Honolulu Clipper 650 miles east of Oahu. [2] After completing 2 more "Magic Carpet" runs, she departed Pearl Harbor on 27 January 1946 and reached Norfolk, Va. on 18 February.

She steamed to Boston from 15–17 April, decommissioned there on 31 July 1946, and entered the Atlantic Reserve Fleet. She was reclassified CVU-61 on 12 June 1955 her name was struck from the Navy list on 27 May 1958 and she was sold for scrap to Hugo Neu Corp., 2 September 1959.

Manila Bay received eight battle stars for World War II service.

This article incorporates text from the public domain Dictionary of American Naval Fighting Ships. The entry can be found here.


Watch the video: Casablanca Class (July 2022).


Comments:

  1. Raad

    And what would we do without your very good idea



Write a message