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Ludlow II DD- 112 - History

Ludlow II DD- 112 - History


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Ludlow II
(DD-112: dp. 1.060, 1. 314'5": b. 31'9"; dr. 9'2"; a.
35 k.; cpl. 123; a. 3 4", 1 3", 12 21" tt:; cl. Wickes)

The second Ludlow (DD-112) was laid down 7 January 1918 at Union Iron Works, San Francisco, Calif., Launched 9 June 1918; sponsored by Miss 13:Elizabeth Ludlow Chrystie, a descendant of. Lieutenant Ludlow; and commissioned 23 December 1918 Comdr M. K. Metcalf in command.

Following west coast shakedown, Ludlow embarked on the continuous training program which is a hallmark of the U.S. Navy. On 17 July 1920 she was redesignated DM1Q A change of home ports followed 19 January 1921 when she arrived Pearl Harbor for 8 years with Mine Squadron 2, Fleet Base Force.

Ludlow Joined in gunnery practice, mining operations antisubmarine training, and fleet battle problems in the Hawaiian Islands and off the west coast, and in 1929 trained Naval Reserves. Leaving Pearl Harbor 16 November 1929, she arrived San Diego the 26th, and there decommissioned 24 May 1930. Struck from the Navy list 18 November, she was scrapped and her metal sold 10 March 1931.


After shakedown in the Caribbean, Lansdale departed Boston 18 January 1941 for neutrality patrol duty in the Caribbean. She cruised off Cuba, the Virgin Islands, Martinique, and the British West Indies before returning to Boston 6 March. After escort training along the Atlantic coast, she screened transports from Charleston, S.C., to Argentia, Newfoundland, in late June, then departed Argentia 30 June on a neutrality-patrol run to Iceland. During the remainder of the year she made three escort runs between Newfoundland and Iceland. En route to Hvalfjordur, Iceland, when the United States entered the war against the Axis, she steamed to Boston 15 to 24 December.

Lansdale escorted seven troopships from New York to Key West. 22 to 27 January 1942 before arriving Casco Bay, Maine, 1 February to serve as plane guard for Wasp (CV 7). For the next 6 months ASW patrols and escort run carried her from the eastern seaboard to Iceland, the Caribbean, the Panama Canal, and the Gulf of Mexico. From 8 to 21 May she patrolled the Atlantic between Puerto Rico and Bermuda with Savannah (CL-42) and Juneau (CL-52), after which she resumed convoy screening out of Norfolk.

On 9 August Lansdale joined a convoy out of Halifax, Nova Scotia, bound for northern Ireland. Arriving Lisahally the 18th, she returned as escort from Greenock, Scotland, to New York 27 August to 5 September. After escorting another convoy from New York via Halifax to northern Ireland, she returned to New York 10 to 21 October as screen for Arkansas (BB-33), then departed 2 November with Task Force 38 to escort convoy UGF-2 to north Africa. Arriving Safi, French Morocco, 18 November, she patrolled approaches to Safi and Casablanca until 22 December when she sailed for New York in a convoy of 41 transports and six escorts.

Reaching New York 10 January 1943, she underwent overhaul until 30 January when she departed with a convoy for northern Ireland. She reached Londonderry 9 February, joined with units of the 42d British Escort Group, and departed 15 February to escort tankers from the United Kingdom to the West Indies. As the convoy steamed south of the Azores on the 23d, a German wolf pack of 6 to 10 submarines made early morning and late night attacks that sank three tankers and damaged two others. Lansdale made several ASW counterattacks without known results but two nights later she hit a submerging U-boat with 5-inch gunfire. Although scattered night attacks continued until the 27th, prompt, aggressive counterattacks by American escorts prevented further losses.

Lansdale arrived Port-au-Spain, Trinidad, 6 March as escort for SS Maasyerk before proceeding 8 to 9 March to Curaçao, Netherland West Indies, for more escort duty. From 20 March until 6 October she made eight escort runs between the Caribbean and the United Kingdom, three convoy runs between Curaçao and New York, and periodic escort and patrol runs to Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands.

Continuing escort duty out of Norfolk, Lansdale made a run to Casablanca and back between 3 November and 17 December before sailing again for north Africa 13 January 1944. She reached Casablanca 1 February and continued the next day via Oran and Algiers to Tunis where she arrived the 10th. After escorting Brooklyn (CL-40) to Algiers, she arrived Pozzouli, Italy, 14 February for operations off the Anzio beachhead. Until returning to Oran 22 to 26 March, she searched for German submarines and screened Philadelphia (CL-41) during fire support and shore bombardment operations from Naples to Anzio.

Lansdale departed Oran 10 April and joined convoy UGS-37, composed of 60 merchant ships and six LSTs, bound from Norfolk to Bizerte. At 2330 on 11 April some 16 to 25 German Dornier and Junkers bombers attacked the convoy off Cape Bengut, Algeria. During the next hour the planes lit the night with flares and struck at the tightly formed convoy with torpedoes and radio-controlled bombs. Although Holder (DE-401) took a torpedo hit amidships, warning of an impending attack, an effective smokescreen, and massive, accurate antiaircraft fire repulsed the enemy planes. While losing four planes, the Germans failed to sink a single ship.

Leaving UGC-37 on 12 April, Lansdale escorted three merchant ships from Oran to westbound convoy UGS-36. Then she sailed from Oran 18 April to join UGS-38 the next day. Stationed off the port bow of the Bizerte-bound convoy, she served as a &ldquojam ship&rdquo against radio-controlled bombs, in addition to screening against U-boats. As the ships hugged the Algerian coast during first watch 20 April, they approached approximately the same position off Cape Bengut where the Luftwaffe had attacked UGS-37 on 11 to 12 April. Though warned of possible attack during the afternoon and evening, the ships had little chance to avoid the strike unleashed by the Germans shortly after 2100.

Attacking as twilight faded, the enemy planes, flying close to shore and low over the water, evaded radar detection until they were almost upon the convoy. Some 18 to 24 Junkers and Heinkel bombers struck in three waves, minutes after Joseph E. Campbell (DE-70) of the outer screen reported, &ldquothey are all around me . . . they are enemy, they are enemy.&rdquo

The first wave of about nine JU-88s attacked from dead ahead. Their torpedoes damaged SS Samite and detonated high explosives on board SS Paul Hamilton, blowing her out of the water and killing all 580 men on board. The second wave of about seven Junkers hit the starboard flank of the convoy and damaged two more merchant ships, one fatally. And the third, consisting of about five HE-111s, bore down on the convoy&rsquos port bow, Lansdale&rsquos station.

Silhouetted by the explosion of Paul Hamilton at 2104, Lansdale was attacked from both port and starboard by planes from two and possibly three waves. As Heinkels approached on the port bow and launched two torpedoes that missed, Lansdale turned to starboard to repel five JU-88s which had veered seaward from the convoy. Her guns hit one as it passed down the starboard side but, as it splashed well astern, another launched a torpedo 500 yards on the starboard beam before passing over the forecastle under heavy fire and splashing on the port quarter.

The torpedo struck the starboard side forward about 2106, wrecking the forward fireroom and opening both sides to the sea. Almost split in two, Lansdale immediately took a 12° list to port. Her rudder jammed 22° right, and she steamed at 13 knots in a clockwise circle.

At 2112 she again came under attack. Two bombers launched torpedoes on the beam and broad on the bow to port but both missed the still-turning ship. Despite the increasing list, her guns splashed one of the planes as it turned away from the ship.

At 2120 the course of the ship straightened out, but the list increased steadily. Within 2 minutes it reached 45° despite the valiant efforts of her crew to control the battle damage. Her skipper, Lt. Comdr. D. M. Swift, ordered her abandoned when he feared the stricken ship might roll &ldquocompletely over.&rdquo By 2130 the list had increased to 80° and the destroyer began to break up. Five minutes later she broke in half, and the stern section quickly sank. The forward section sank 20 minutes later as Menges (DE-320) and Newell (DE-322) began rescue operations.

The two destroyer escorts swept the water from 2155 until 0330 the next morning searching for survivors. Menges picked up 115 men, including two German fliers who were shot down either by Lansdale or Newell. Newell rescued 119 survivors, including Lieutenant Commander Swift. Forty-seven officers and men were carried down with Lansdale.


Ludlow II DD- 112 - History

After a shakedown cruise in the eastern Atlantic, Nicholson escorted convoys through the U-boat-infested, storm-tossed North Atlantic, first from Boston to Iceland and then to Scotland and England until fall 1942. In a brief training period off the Virginia coast, she prepared for the Casablanca invasion but a turbine casualty prevented her participation in the initial landings. She arrived four days later, 12 November, to assist in the consolidation of the beachhead and to patrol.

In 1943, Nicholson took part in the Bizerte campaign and the initial assaults on Salerno, coming under heavy air attack from the Luftwaffe at both Bizerte and Salerno. After five months in the Mediterranean, she returned to the United States for overhaul in preparation for Pacific deployment.

In January 1944, Nicholson sailed from New York. When she reached New Guinea in February, she was assigned to escort LSTs in the Cape Gloucester campaign, already under way.

Throughout the long New Guinea campaign, a matter of successive assaults on coastal points and nearby islands, Nicholson gave gunfire support to troops ashore. She had similar duty in the Admiralties where, during the conquest of Seeadler Harbor, she was assigned to draw fire from an enemy battery on Hauwei. There, a 4-inch shell struck in No. 2 ammunition handling room, killing 3 and wounding 4. Nicholson wiped out the enemy position.

In August 1944 Nicholson joined the Third Fleet in the Marshall Islands. She screened fast carriers in raids on the Bonins, Formosa and the Philippines and supported the invasion of the Palaus and the neutralization of Yap. Returning to the Philippines, her group assisted the Seventh Fleet during the invasion of Leyte and the decisive Battle for Leyte Gulf, from which Nicholson sailed for a Seattle overhaul.

Returning to the western Pacific in February 1945, Nicholson escorted convoys between Guam and Ulithi. In late March, she sailed as part of the Okinawa invasion fleet. On the exposed radar picket line, Nicholson came through untouched by kamikazes and rescued survivors from Little and Morrison when those destroyers were sunk.

Rejoining the Third Fleet for the final air operations against the Japanese home islands, Nicholson was off Honshu at the war&rsquos end. She entered Sagami Wan on 9 August and Tokyo Bay on 15 September. Returning to San Diego on 6 November, she sailed for Panama and Charleston, South Carolina, where she arrived on 23 November to join the Atlantic Reserve Fleet.

Nicholson decommissioned on 26 February 1946, was assigned as a Naval Reserve Training ship in the Third Naval District on 30 November 1948 and recommissioned on 17 July 1950. On 15 January 1951, she decommissioned once more and transferred to the Italian Navy as Aviere. In 1970, she was converted to an experimental gun ship before being stricken and sunk as a target in 1975.


Every prisoner of war camp in the UK mapped and listed

What would happen if the UK's prison population suddenly increased by 400,000 people? That's what occurred between 1939 and 1948, when thousands of Germans, Ukranians and others became Britain's prisoners of war, according to a new book.

The camps where the PoWs were imprisoned have largely (but not all) disappeared. At one time hundreds of them were spread across the UK.

The best known was Island Farm in Wales - scene of a 'great escape' in 1945, with some German POWs getting as far as Birmingham and Southampton.

UK PoW camps mapped using Google Fusion tables. Click here for the fullscreen version

Author Sophie Jackson has written a book, Churchill's Unexpected Guests, examining this overlooked period of Britain's history, looking at what happened to every camp from the period.

Researching POW camp locations proved a challenge when compiling Churchill's Unexpected Guests. Few official lists of camps or prisoners remain from that time and most camps were temporary and pulled down after the war. Some have subsequently been built on.

Most modern camp lists are based on archaeological work – ironic when the camps existed a mere 60 years ago. English Heritage has worked hard to find the locations of camps, but even so many are still undiscovered.

Records from the time give an insight into camp life and sometimes reveal the name of a camp, but often the documents didn't reveal the actual address, and prisoners were not allowed to write their camp address on any letters they sent home.

Despite the difficulties a great number of camps have been identified, including the few listed here. Some were more famous than others, such as Island Farm Camp, Bridgend from which an audacious escape attempt was made by German prisoners.

Over the coming years no doubt more camps will be added to this list as they are discovered, but many will remain forgotten forever, the last traces of their Nazi occupants long lost.

The English Heritage research referred to by Sophie was conducted by Roger Thomas and published in 2003. You can see the original report here.

Thomas says the full list is still not complete:

Although there is a numeric sequence of 1,026 PoW Camps, there is no indication that this total was ever fully utilised. Substantial gaps exist in the sequence that are common to all sources consulted. Nevertheless, a number of sites have been located that remain unidentified and presumably fitted into the sequence somewhere.

Some sites comprised more than one facility. Thanks to English Heritage, we are allowed to reproduce that list - you can download the data behind the map above.


VOW (Veterans Opportunity to Work) to Hire Heroes Act of 2011

On November 21, 2011, President Obama signed the VOW (Veterans Opportunity to Work) to Hire Heroes Act of 2011 (Public Law 112-56). The VOW Act amends chapter 21 of title 5, United States Code (U.S.C.) by adding section 2108a, “Treatment of certain individuals as veterans, disabled veterans, and preference eligibles.” This new section requires Federal agencies to treat certain active duty service members as preference eligibles for purposes of an appointment in the competitive service, even though the service members have not been discharged or released from active duty.

Many members of the armed forces start their civilian job search prior to discharge or release from active duty and thus do not have a DD form 214 when applying for Federal jobs. The VOW Act was enacted to ensure these individuals do not lose the opportunity to be considered for Federal service (and awarded their veterans’ preference entitlements if applicable) despite not having a DD form 214 to submit along with their résumés.

This new section requires Federal agencies to treat active duty service members as veterans and preference eligibles under section 2108 when they submit a “certification” when applying for a Federal job. The “certification” is any written document from the armed forces that certifies the service member is expected to be discharged or released from active duty service in the armed forces under honorable conditions not later than 120 days after the date the certification is signed. Therefore, agencies must accept applications and consider for appointment and veterans’ preference any service member who submits a certification in lieu of a DD form 214. Prior to appointment, agencies must verify the service member is eligible for veterans’ preference in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 2108, unless the service member is appointed under the provisions of 5 U.S.C. 5534a, “Dual employment and pay during terminal leave from uniformed services.”

The Office of Personnel Management is reviewing its regulations, guidance, web sites, etc., to ensure that the provisions of 5 U.S.C. 2108a are incorporated into these policy vehicles. We are attaching a Fact Sheet (Attachment A) and Frequently Asked Questions (Attachment B) on VOW for your information. These attachments will be posted on OPM’s website. If you have any questions, please feel free to contact Michael J. Mahoney, Manager, Hiring Policy, at [email protected] or at 202-606-1142.

Attachment A-Fact Sheet on VOW (Veterans Opportunity to Work) To Hire Heroes Act of 2011

On November 21, 2011, President Obama signed the VOW (Veterans Opportunity to Work) To Hire Heroes Act of 2011.
The VOW amends chapter 21 of title 5, United States Code (U.S.C.) by adding section 2108a, “Treatment of certain individuals as veterans, disabled veterans, and preference eligibles.”
Section 2108a requires Federal agencies to treat active duty service members as veterans, disabled veterans, or preference eligibles for purposes of appointment in the competitive service when these service members submit a certification of expected discharge or release from active duty under honorable conditions along with their applications for Federal employment.
A certification is any written document from the armed forces that certifies the service member is expected to be discharged or released from active duty service in the armed forces under honorable conditions not later than 120 days from the date the certification is signed.
Agencies must accept, process, and consider applications for appointment from any service member who submits a certification in the same manner as they would consider other preference eligibles.
Prior to appointment, agencies must verify the veteran is eligible for veterans’ preference in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 2108, unless the service member is appointed under the provisions of 5 U.S.C. 5534a, “Dual employment and pay during terminal leave from uniformed services.”

Attachment B- Frequently Asked Questions on VOW (Veterans Opportunity to Work) To Hire Heroes Act of 2011

Q. What is the VOW to Hire Heroes Act of 2011?

A. The VOW (Veterans Opportunity to Work) To Hire Heroes Act of 2011 was signed into law by President Obama on November 22, 2011. It requires Federal agencies to treat active duty service members as veterans, disabled veterans and preference eligibles for purposes of an appointment in the competitive service.

A. Many service members begin their civilian job search prior to being discharged or released from active duty service and thus do not have a DD form 214, Certificate of Release or Discharge from Active Duty, when applying for Federal jobs. The VOW Act was enacted to ensure these individuals do not lose the opportunity to be considered for Federal service (and awarded their veterans’ preference entitlements if applicable) despite not having a DD form 214 to submit along with their résumés.

Q. What type of documentation is an active duty service member required to furnish with a job application?

A. The VOW requires the active duty service member to furnish a “certification.”

Q. What is a “certification?”

A. A “certification” is any written document from the armed forces that certifies the service member is expected to be discharged or released from active duty service in the armed forces under honorable conditions not later than 120 days after the date the certification is signed.

Q. What affect does this new provision have on how agencies process applications of eligible veterans?

A. Agencies are required to accept, process, and grant tentative veterans’ preference to those active duty service members who submit a certification along with their job application materials.

Q. Should agencies automatically award veterans’ preference to individuals eligible under the VOW Act upon receiving the veteran’s job application?


Social Media See All Social Media from Salt Lake County

Clark Planetarium is pleased to announce the opening of BBC Earth’s ANTARCTICA, a new film that will premiere in the Northrop Grumman IMAX Theatre on Saturday, June 5, 2021. The film features Academy Award® nominated actor Benedict Cumberbatch (“Sherlock,” “Doctor Strange”) as he narrates a journey through the most extreme continent on our planet.

Clark Planetarium is pleased to announce the opening of “Antarctica,” a new IMAX film that will premiere in the Northrop Grumman IMAX on Saturday, June 5, 2021.

Celebrating the 75th summer of providing fun and healthy venues, programs, and experiences to people across the valley, Salt Lake County Parks and Recreation will kick off its outdoor pool season beginning May 29.

If 25% of residents conserved 5% of their typical water use, Salt Lake County could collectively save 2 million gallons of water every single day – the equivalent of about nine lap swimming pools.


Records of the American Expeditionary Forces (World War I)

Established: Under the War Department by General Order 1, Headquarters American Expeditionary Forces (AEF), May 26, 1917, pursuant to letter, Secretary of War Newton D. Baker to General John J. Pershing, same date, transmitting Presidential instruction.

Functions: Conducted military operations against Germany during World War I. Conducted military operations in North Russia. Provided medical and sanitary relief in Poland. Occupied Germany after the war.

Abolished: Effective August 31, 1920, by General Order 49, War Department, August 14, 1920, which discontinued General Headquarters AEF.

Successor Agencies: American Forces in Germany (AFIG, 1919-23) American Forces in France (AFIF, 1919-20).

Finding Aids: Aloha Broadwater, Kathryn M. English, Elaine C. Everly, and Garry D. Ryan, comps., "Preliminary Inventory of the Textual Records of the American Expeditionary Forces (World War I), 1917-23, Part I," NM 91 (Feb. 1968) Aloha Broadwater, Elaine C. Everly, and Garry D. Ryan, comps., "Preliminary Inventory of the Textual Records of the American Expeditionary Forces (World War I), 1917-23, Part II," NM 92 (Apr. 1968).

Related Records: Record copies of publications of the American Expeditionary Forces (World War I) in RG 287, Publications of the U.S. Government. Records of the American Expeditionary Forces in Siberia, in RG 395, Records of U.S. Army Overseas Operations and Commands, 1898-1942. Cablegrams relating to AEF in RG 407, Records of the Adjutant General's Office, 1917- .

Subject Access Terms: World War I.

RECORD TYPES RECORD LOCATIONS QUANTITIES
Textual Records Washington Area 25,653 cu. ft.
Maps and Charts Washington Area 62 items
College Park 25,251 items
Arch/engrg Plans Washington Area 896 items
College Park 443 items
Aerial Photographs College Park 16,957 items
Still Pictures College Park 5,760 images

120.2 RECORDS OF GENERAL HEADQUARTERS (GHQ) AEF
1917-21
960 lin. ft. and 132 rolls of microfilm

History: GHQ AEF organized by General Order 8, Headquarters AEF, July 5, 1917. Consisted of the personal staff of the commander in chief chief of staff general staff secretary of the general staff and administrative and technical staff, including logistical functions vested in commanding general of the Line of Communication (LOC). GHQ reorganized by General Order 31, Headquarters AEF, February 16, 1918, which separated LOC and certain technical staff elements from GHQ and designated them collectively as Service of the Rear (SOR). GHQ located in Paris, June 1-September 13, 1917, subsequently at Chaumont. GHQ transferred to Washington, DC, effective September 1, 1919, pursuant to General Order 88, Headquarters AEF, August 22, 1919, and was formally abolished, effective August 31, 1920, by General Order 49, War Department, August 14, 1920.

120.2.1 Records of the office of the commander in chief

Textual Records: General correspondence, 1917-19 (550 ft.), with indexes (including 132 rolls of microfilm). Correspondence relating to AEF schools ("Training File"), 1917-19. Correspondence of Headquarters, General of the Armies, Washington, DC, 1920-21. Reports of inspections of U.S. military installations by General Pershing, 1919-20.

Maps (18 items): Operations maps, Saint-Mihiel and Meuse-Argonne sectors, accompanying Commander in Chief's report of November 20, 1918 (2 items). Communications network diagram, 1918 (1 item). Operations in North Russia, n.d. (14 items). "Instructions Concerning Maps," 1918 (1 item). SEE ALSO 120.15.

Microfilm Publications: T900.

120.2.2 Records of the chief of staff

Textual Records: Correspondence, memorandums, cablegrams, and miscellaneous records, 1917-19.

120.2.3 Records of the secretary of the general staff

Textual Records: Historical reports and monographs, 1917-19. War diaries, 1917-19 (202 ft.).

120.3 RECORDS OF THE GENERAL STAFF, GHQ AEF
1911-27 (bulk 1917-19)
1,478 lin. ft.

120.3.1 Records of the First Section, G-1 (Administration)

Textual Records: General correspondence of the Administrative Division, 1917-19. Correspondence of the American Red Cross representative at GHQ, 1917-18. General correspondence and tables of organization of the Organization and Equipment Division, 1917- 19. Records of the Personnel Division, including the AEF Order of Battle and reports and summaries of troop arrivals and movements, 1917-19. Personnel and equipment reports of the Statistical Division, 1917-20. Records of the Liaison Office, 1917-19. General correspondence, official history, and other records of the provost marshal general, 1917-19. Records of the Division of Criminal Investigation and Prisoner of War Division, 1917-19.

Maps (4 items): Administrative maps, 1918 (2 items). "Map Index of France," 1918 (2 items). SEE ALSO 120.15.

120.3.2 Records of the Second Section, G-2 (Intelligence)

Textual Records: General correspondence and other records of the assistant chief of staff (G-2), 1917-19. Records of the Information Division (G-2-A), including histories of German and Austrian divisions produced by the Battle Order Section (G-2-A- 1) captured German documents maintained by the Artillery Materiel, Economics, and Translations Section (G-2-A-2), 1917-18 records of the Enemy Works Section (G-2-A-3) relating to European towns and cities ("Town File"), 1917-19 records of the Radio Intelligence Section (G-2-A-6) relating to enemy codes and ciphers, 1917-19 records of the Air Intelligence Section (G-2-A- 7) relating to enemy air installations and Allied bombing targets, 1917-19 and retained copies of intelligence summaries prepared or distributed by the Dissemination and Filing Section (G-2-A-8), 1917-19, including copies of The Stars and Stripes, 1918-19. Records of the Secret Service Division (G-2-B), including general correspondence, 1917-19, and records of the Negative Intelligence Department of the American Commission to Negotiate Peace, 1918-19, maintained by the Administrative Section (G-2-B-1) intelligence and other reports of military attaches, maintained by the Positive Intelligence Section (G-2-B- 2), 1917-19 records of the Counterespionage Section (G-2-B-3), 1917-19 and records of the Suspects and Circulation Section (G- 2-B-4), 1917-19, including a name card file of Bolsheviks, n.d. Records of the Topographical, Map Supply, and Sound and Flash Ranging Division (G-2-C), 1917-19. Records of the Censorship and Press Division (G-2-D), 1917-19, including general correspondence of the Office of The Stars and Stripes. General correspondence and other records of the Visitors' Bureau (G-2-E), 1917-19. Records of the American Mission of the Interallied Bureau, 1918- 19.

Maps (2,076 items): G-2 maps, 1917-19 (50 items), including maps from the Military Mission at Archangel, operations maps (Saint- Mihiel and Meuse-Argonne sectors), and maps showing proposed boundaries for Trieste. G-2-A-1 maps showing enemy order of battle, Western Front, 1917-18 (89 items) and Eastern Front, 1917-19 (26 items). G-2-A-2 mineral resource maps of Austro- Hungarian area of Ratschach and of French Lorraine, 1918 (3 items). G-2-A-3 maps of German defenses, facilities, and transportation networks frontlines Allied and enemy operations and geology and water supply (American sector), 1918 (459 items). G-2-A-6 maps of German artillery wireless stations and field radio stations, 1918 (137 items). G-2-A-7 maps of German airfields (28 items) and Allied bombing targets (50 items), 1918 French maps of German towns, 1916-18 (188 items) French air charts showing bombing targets, 1916 (39 items) British Air Packets, consisting of maps and aerial photographs of European areas, 1916 (66 items) exhibits accompanying the air order of battle and bomb target reports, 1918 (120 items) and aerial photo maps and mosaics of strategic and industrial cities, 1918 (79 items). G-2-B map of Bolshevist activity in Germany, 1919 (1 item). G-2-C general maps and related material, 1917-19 (218 items) sample file of maps produced by G-2 and its French and British counterparts, 1917-19 (32 items) commercially published maps of areas in Europe, 1911-27 (90 items) topographic survey and other maps produced by the 29th Engineers, 1917-19 (48 items) miscellaneous maps produced at the Base Printing Plant, including reprints of French and German maps, 1918-19 (344 items) topographic maps of the Argonne-Montfaucon area, produced as a map exercise by the Mobile Topographic Unit, 1919 (2 items) and topographic survey and other maps produced by various engineer regiments, 1917-19 (7 items). SEE ALSO 120.15.

Aerial Photographs (16,333 items): American, French, and some German aerial photographs and index maps relating to the Western Front, 1917-19 (16,291 items). G-2-C volume of British aerial photographs of the Battle of Messines, 1917 (42 items). SEE ALSO 120.15.

120.3.3 Records of the Third Section, G-3 (Operations)

Textual Records: General correspondence, 1917-19. Reports of special operations, 1917-19. Journals of operations, 1917-19. AEF headquarters war diary, 1917-18. Charts showing composition of AEF infantry divisions, 1917-19. Divisional history charts, 1917- 18. G-3 library, 1917-19.

Maps (2,230 items): General maps, 1918-19 (108 items). Operations and other special maps, 1918-19 (28 items). Frontline maps, 1918- 19 (122 items). Maps annotated to show 1918 advances and other movements of American divisions, 1919 (155 items). Area and boundary maps, 1917-19 (149 items). Combined order of battle maps, 1919 (36 vols., 1,103 items). Situation and movement maps, 1918-19 (519 items). Comparison map overlays of German offensives, 1918 (15 items). Blueprint maps used for visibility studies, 1918 (31 items). SEE ALSO 120.15.

120.3.4 Records of the Fourth Section, G-4 (Coordination)

Textual Records: General correspondence, daily situation reports, and other records of the assistant chief of staff (G-4), 1917-19. Correspondence, reports, and other records of the Engineering and Construction Division (G-4-C), Quartermaster Activities Section (G-4-E), and Troop Assignment Section (G-4-H), 1917-19. Records of the Railheads and Regulating Stations Section (G-4-I), including stations at Connantre, Creil, Dunkerque, Is-sur-Tille, Le Bourget, Liffol-le-Grand, Nantes, Noisy-le-Sec, and Saint Dizier, 1918-19.

Maps (52 items): Maps, some prepared jointly with G-3, relating to organization and activities of the Services of Supply, 1917- 19. SEE ALSO 120.15.

120.3.5 Records of the Fifth Section, G-5 (Training)

Textual Records: Correspondence, reports, and other records of the assistant chief of staff (G-5), 1917-19. Correspondence and other records of the chief athletic officer, 1917-19. Correspondence of the Army Educational Commission, 1918-19. Records of Headquarters Army Schools, Army General Staff College, Army School of the Line, Army Candidates School, Army Center of Artillery Studies, Army Engineer School, Army Gas School, Army Infantry Specialists School, Army Intelligence School, Army Machine Gun School, Army Sanitary School, and Army Signal School, all at Langres, 1917-19. Records of AEF University (Beaune), 1918-19. Records of Bandmasters and Musicians School (Chaumont), 1917-19. Records of Infantry Candidates School (La Valbonne), 1917-19. Records of I Corps School (Gondrecourt), II Corps School (Chatillon-sur-Seine), and III Corps School (Clamecy), 1917-19.

Maps (260 items): Maps showing locations of training areas and facilities, 1918-19 (99 items). Instructional maps, 1917-18 (159 items). Target range maps, Saumur Artillery School, Fontevrault, 1918 (2 items). SEE ALSO 120.15.

Photographic Prints (864 images): Air Service facilities in France, 1917-19 (AS). SEE ALSO 120.16.

120.3.6 Records of the Historical Section

Textual Records: General correspondence, 1918-19. Correspondence relating to war diaries, American Indians serving in the AEF, and AEF administration, 1917-19. Reports relating to AEF unit histories, 1917-19. Reports of military observers with the French Army, 1915-17. Inspector General's report of an investigation of the Young Men's Christian Association (YMCA), 1917-19. Report on the history of the Postal Express Service, 1917-19.

120.4 RECORDS OF THE ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF, GHQ AEF
1917-26 (bulk 1917-19)
1,002 lin. ft.

120.4.1 Records of the adjutant general

Textual Records: General and special orders, general court- martial orders, and other issuances, 1917-20. Reference library, 1917-19. Cablegrams sent and received by the Cable Division, 1917-19 (171 ft.). Records of the Miscellaneous Division, including station lists and troop movements files of the Troop Movement Section, 1917-19 and correspondence of the Army Field Clerk Section, 1917-19. Correspondence of the Motor Dispatch Service, 1918-19. Correspondence and efficiency reports of the Officers' Division, 1917-19. Records of the Permit Division, 1917-19. Correspondence, case files, and other records of the Personnel Division, 1917-19. Records of the Postal Express Service, 1918-19. Records of the Statistical Division, including general correspondence, 1917-19 records of the Officers' Roster Section, Station List Section, and Strength Return Section, 1917- 19 name files maintained by the Casualty Information and Check Section of dead and wounded and of men reported missing in action or prisoners of war, 1918 (283 ft.) correspondence and lists of the Central Records Office relating to American prisoners of war in Germany, and of German and Austro-Hungarian prisoners held by the AEF, 1918-19.

Microfilm Publications: M930.

Maps (765 items): Activities, 1917-19, of American divisions and German troops on the Western Front, in atlases, n.d. (565 items). Related materials, including a general map index, lists, and a study of German military maps, 1917-26 (200 items). SEE ALSO 120.15.

Aerial Photographs (300 items): American aerial photographs and index maps relating to the Western Front, 1918-19, and an aerial photograph index list, 1925. SEE ALSO 120.15.

120.4.2 Records of the inspector general

Textual Records: General correspondence, 1917-19. Inspection reports, 1917-19. Correspondence relating to an investigation of YMCA property sales in France, 1917-19.

Maps (170 items): General maps and French commercially published maps of Europe, 1917-23, with related material. SEE ALSO 120.15.

120.4.3 Records of the judge advocate general

Textual Records: General correspondence, 1917-19. General court- martial orders, 6th-78th Infantry Divisions, 1917-19.

120.4.4 Records of the chief chaplain

Textual Records: Correspondence, 1917-19.

120.4.5 Records of the headquarters commandant

Textual Records: General correspondence, 1917-19. Issuances, 1917-19. Correspondence, issuances, and other records of Companies A-D, Headquarters Battalion, 1917-19 Casual Companies 1 and 2, 1918-19 Provisional Infantry Company, 1918-19 and other headquarters elements, 1917-19.

Architectural and Engineering Plans (153 items): Blueprints of AEF storage buildings in France, 1917-18 (147 items). Portable aerial ropeway system for use in trenches, 1917-18 (6 items). SEE ALSO 120.15.

120.5 RECORDS OF THE TECHNICAL STAFF, GHQ AEF
1917-19
543 lin. ft.

120.5.1 Records of the chief of the Air Service

Textual Records: General correspondence, 1917-19 (110 ft.). "History of the U.S. Army Air Service," compiled by Col. Edgar S. Gorrell, 1917-19 (286 vols.), with indexes. Card files of casualties, 1917-19. Special reports, histories, and other records relating to Air Service offices, installations, and units, 1918-19 (114 ft.). Records of the 1st Air Depot (Columbey- les-Belles), Air Service Production Center No. 2 (Romorantin), Spare Parts Subdivision (Nanterre), Treves Airdrome, and 1st-9th Casual Companies, 1918-19. Records of the 2d, 3d, and 7th Aviation Instruction Centers and 1st-4th Mechanics Regiments, 1917-19. Records of the 1st-3d Air Parks, 1917-18. Records relating to balloon operations, including correspondence of Balloon Wing Companies D-F, 1918-19.

Microfilm Publications: M990.

Maps (246 items): Location maps for Allied and enemy air installations and targets, 1918 (194 items). Weekly enemy works and activity maps of the Western Front, 1918 (52 items). SEE ALSO 120.15.

Aerial Photographs (324 items): American and a few German aerial photographs relating to the Western Front, some with interpretations, 1918 (170 items) and related American and British aerial photography interpretive materials, 1918 (154 items).

Photographic Prints (137 images): Work of the Camouflage, Bridging, and Mining Section of the Army Engineer School, in albums, ca. 1918 (ESC). SEE ALSO 120.16.

120.5.2 Records of the chief of artillery

Textual Records: General correspondence, telegrams, issuances, and miscellaneous records of the Office of the Chief of Artillery, 1917-19. Records of the Field Artillery Section, 1918- 19, including records of Field Artillery Training Camps (Coetquidan Souge Camp Hunt, Le Courneau), Field Artillery Replacement Regiment (Camp Hunt, Le Courneau), and Field Artillery Motor Training Center (Le Blanc), 1918. Records of the Heavy Artillery Section, 1917-19, including records of the Heavy Artillery School (Angers), 1917-19 Tractor Artillery School (Gien), 1918 Organization and Training Centers 1-5 (Libourne, Limoges, Clermont-Ferrand, Angers, Angouleme), 1918-19 and the Montmorillon firing range, 1918. Records of the Materiel Section, 1917-19.

120.5.3 Records of the Railway Artillery Reserve

Textual Records: General correspondence, 1918-19. Correspondence and other records of the 30th Artillery Brigade, 1917-18. Issuances, 1918-19. History (July 1917-Dec. 1918) of the Railway Artillery Reserve, December 1918.

Maps (2 items): Construction plans, Railway Artillery Reserve camp at Haussimond, 1917-18. SEE ALSO 120.15.

120.5.4 Records of the Anti-Aircraft Service

Textual Records: General correspondence, 1917-18. Records of the Anti-Aircraft School (Arnouville), 1918 the 1st-9th Anti- Aircraft Sectors, 1917-19 and the 1st-6th Anti-Aircraft Battalions, 1918.

120.6 RECORDS OF ADVANCE GENERAL HEADQUARTERS
1915-19 (bulk 1918-19)
56 lin. ft.

History: Located at Ligny-en-Barrois, October 25-December 3, 1918, and subsequently at Trier (Treves). Superseded by Third Army pursuant to telegraphic instruction, assistant chief of staff (G-3), to Advance GHQ, June 1, 1919.

Textual Records: General correspondence, 1918-19. Issuances, 1918-19. File containing general information on the Rhine Valley, 1918-19. Correspondence of the Secret Service Division (G-2-B), 1918-19. Correspondence and other records of the Operations Section (G-3), 1919. Records of the civil affairs officer, 1918- 19.

Maps (61 items): Situation maps, 1918-19 (30 items). French maps of France and Germany, 1915-16 (31 items). SEE ALSO 120.15.

120.7 RECORDS OF HEADQUARTERS SERVICES OF SUPPLY
1916-21 (bulk 1917-19)
3,153 lin. ft.

History: Logistical functions vested in Line of Communication (LOC), established as a component of the administrative and technical staff, GHQ, by General Order 8, Headquarters AEF, July 5, 1917. LOC and certain elements of the technical staff separated from GHQ by reorganization pursuant to General Order 31, Headquarters AEF, February 16, 1918, and designated collectively as Service of the Rear (SOR), with headquarters at Tours. SOR redesignated Services of Supply (SOS), March 13, 1918, by corrected General Order 31, Headquarters AEF, February 16, 1918. SOS abolished by General Order 88, Headquarters AEF, August 22, 1919, with functions and personnel absorbed, effective September 1, 1919, by newly created American Forces in France, successor to AEF. SEE 120.10.

120.7.1 Records of the Line of Communication

Textual Records: Cablegrams, 1917-18. Issuances, 1917-18.

120.7.2 Records of the Service of the Rear

Textual Records: Issuances, 1918.

120.7.3 Records of the commanding general

Textual Records: General correspondence, 1917-19 (120 ft.). Confidential correspondence, 1917-19, including some for Headquarters, LOC and SOR. Cablegrams, 1918-19. Issuances, 1918- 19. SOS historical file, 1917-19 (91 ft.). Station lists for SOS units, 1918-19.

120.7.4 Records of the general staff

Textual Records: Records of G-1, 1918-19, including general correspondence weekly reports of equipment shipped overseas records of SOS Casual Companies 1-6912 records of the Entertainment Bureau, Entertainment Officer, and Provisional Entertainment Detachment and histories of the Bureau of Prisoners of War, Prisoner of War Division, and Prisoner of War Labor Companies 2-272, 1918-19. Records of G-2, 1918-19, including general, administrative, and personnel correspondence correspondence of the administration officer, G-2 (Paris) and correspondence of the intelligence officer (Dijon), 1918-19. General correspondence, G-4, 1918-19.

120.7.5 Records of the administrative staff

Textual Records: Correspondence of the athletic officer and Recruiting Division, 1919. General correspondence of the inspector general and judge advocate general, 1918-19. Records of the headquarters commandant (Tours), 1918-19, including general correspondence issuances and correspondence and other records of various headquarters offices, detachments, and staff officers.

Maps (112 items): Communication lines and locations of storage and support facilities in Europe, 1918-19. SEE ALSO 120.15.

120.7.6 Records of the chief ordnance officer (technical staff)

Textual Records: General and administrative correspondence of the chief ordnance officer (Chaumont), 1917-18, including correspondence of the Personnel Division. General and administrative correspondence, telegrams, cablegrams, and issuances of the chief ordnance officer (Tours), 1918-19. Records of the Ammunition Supply Board, 1918-19. Records of Headquarters U.S. Ordnance Detachment, German Armistice Material Section, 1918-19. Correspondence, reports, and other records of the Administrative Division, 1918-19, including the Statistical Section of the Inter-Allied Munitions Council. Records of the chief purchasing officer, 1917-19, including correspondence of the Inspection Division, 1918-19, and the Purchasing Division, 1917-19. Records of the Construction and Maintenance Division, 1917-19. Records of the Engineering Division, consisting of correspondence of its Administrative, Aircraft Armament, Artillery Ammunition, Equipment, Field Artillery, Heavy Artillery, Machine Gun and Small Arms, Motor Equipment, Planning, Proving Ground and Laboratory, and Trench Warfare Sections, 1917- 19. Correspondence of the Personnel Division, 1918-19. Correspondence of the Supply Division and its Ammunition and Depot Sections, 1917-19. Records of the 1st-6th Provisional Ordnance Battalions, 1st-8th Heavy Mobile Ordnance Repair Shops, and 1st-601st Mobile Ordnance Repair Shops, 1917-19.

Maps (63 items): Construction plan, Advanced Ordnance Depot 4 (Jonchery-Villers-le-Sec), 1918 (1 item). Blueprints, drawings, and maps of the Administrative Division, 1917-19 (62 items, in Washington Area). SEE ALSO 120.15.

120.7.7 Records of the chief surgeon (technical staff)

Textual Records: Correspondence (150 ft.), cablegrams, issuances, and reports of the Office of the Chief Surgeon, 1917-19. Correspondence and other records of the Finance and Accounting Division and Personnel Division, 1917-19. Daily reports of casualties, compiled monthly reports of diseases, and other records of the Hospitalization Division, 1917-19. Sanitary reports, consolidated reports of sick and wounded, venereal disease reports, and other records of the Sanitation and Inspection Division, including records of the Division of Laboratories and Infectious Diseases (Dijon), 1917-19. Correspondence of the Veterinary Division, 1917-19. Records of hospitals and hospital units, including veterinary hospitals hospitals operated by the American Red Cross, including a hospital in Padua, Italy base, camp, and evacuation hospitals (259 ft.) and hospital trains, 1917-19. Records of AEF infantry division medical officers, offices, and units, 1917-19 (265 ft.). Records of brigade, regimental, and battalion infirmaries, 1917- 19. Historical records of evacuation ambulance, motor ambulance, and nondivisional field hospital companies, 1917-19.

Maps (71 items): Hospital, camp, and depot sites in England, 1917-18 (63 items). Printed outline maps of France, showing location of fixed medical units and hospitals, 1918 (8 items). SEE ALSO 120.15.

Architectural and Engineering Plans (1,186 items): Blueprints and drawings of hospitals, camp buildings, depots, and other AEF facilities in England, 1917-19 (290 items). Hospitalization Division blueprints and drawings of Medical Department facilities in France, 1917-19 (896 items, in Washington Area). SEE ALSO 120.15. 120.7.8 Records of other technical staff officers

Textual Records: Records of the Army Service Corps, 1918-19, including correspondence and issuances of the Director's Office records of the Labor Bureau and records of administrative labor companies, cement mill companies, censor and press companies, cook companies, guard and provisional guard companies, and prisoner of war escort companies. Records of the chief engineer, including an historical report on engineer activities in the AEF (78 ft.), 1917-19. Records of the Finance Bureau, including general correspondence, issuances, reports, periodic statements of disbursements and expenditures, and correspondence of the Board of Contracts and Adjustments, 1918-19. Correspondence, telegrams, cablegrams, reports, and miscellaneous records of the general purchasing agent and field purchasing agents for Great Britain, Italy, Spain, and Switzerland, 1918-19. Correspondence and other records of the Leave Bureau, 1918-19. Records of the Motor Transport Corps, including unit records of administrative and motorcycle companies, 1917-19 motor overhaul, motor reception, and motor transport service parks, 1918-19 and service park units, 1917-21. General correspondence, 1917-19 (126 ft.), and other records of the chief quartermaster, 1916-21 and records of the Graves Registration Service, Remount Division and depots, Salvage Service, and Supply Division, 1918-19. Records of the Renting, Requisition, and Claims Service, 1918-20. Records of the chief signal officer, including general correspondence, 1917- 19 (156 ft.) an historical file, 1917-19 records of the Pigeon Service, 1918-19 records of the Division of Research and Inspection, 1917-19, and Telephone and Telegraph Division, 1918- 19 and records of signal depot battalions, 1917-19, and telegraph battalions, 1916-21. Records of the Transportation Corps, including general correspondence of the Director General of Transportation and of the General Manager of the Transportation Corps records of the U.S. Army Ambulance Service with the French Army and records (205 ft.) of grand divisions, railway engineer regiments, transportation corps companies, and stevedore regiments, 1917-19. Records of the War Risk Insurance Section, 1918-19.

Maps (219 items): Blueprint and printed construction plans, and base, road, and training area maps of the chief engineer, 1917-18 (11 items). Combat railway line and other maps produced by the Division of Military Engineering and Engineering Supplies, Division of Construction and Forestry, Division of Light Railways and Roads, and 16th, 17th, and 21st Engineer Regiments, 1917-19 (52 items). Geologic and water-supply maps produced by the Geologic Section, Assistant Chief Engineer (Chaumont), 1918 (102 items). Billeting map, by the chief billeting officer, 1918 (1 item). Truck route map produced by the Motor Transport Corps, 1918 (1 item). Transportation Corps maps of lines of communication, rail and dock construction, and locomotive and water facilities, 1917-19 (46 items). Communications networks maps produced by the chief signal officer, 1918-19 (3 items) and blueprints and drawings of the Telephone and Telegraph Division, 1918-19 (3 items). SEE ALSO 120.15.

120.8 RECORDS OF SOS GEOGRAPHICAL SECTIONS
1917-20
1,121 lin. ft.

120.8.1 Records of Base Sections 1-8

History: Base Sections, centered on coastal ports, were established to facilitate movement of troops and supplies. Base Sections 1-7 were responsible for deliveries to American forces in France Base Section 8, to American troops in Italy and Base Section 9, to American occupation forces in Germany. There are no separately maintained records of Base Section 9 in the National Archives.

Le Havre designated as headquarters for Base Section 3, including SOS elements in England, August 13, 1917. Separate headquarters established in London, October 2, 1917. Base Section 3 divided, November 27, 1917, with Le Havre designated headquarters of Base Section 4, and a new Base Section 3 (London) established.

Base Section Established Transferred (To) Abolished (Successor)
1 08/13/17 09/01/19 (AFIF) 10/20/19
2 08/13/17 09/01/19 (AFIF) 09/30/19 (HQ AFIF)
3 08/13/17 11/27/17 (Base Section 4, SOS)
3 11/27/17 06/15/19 (HQ SOS)
4 11/27/17 04/16/19 (Intermed. Section, SOS)
5 11/27/17 09/01/19 (AFIF) 01/04/20
6 06/28/18 6/15/19 (Intermed. Section, SOS)
7 06/28/18 4/25/19 (Base Section 2, SOS)
8 10/22/18 05/20/19 (HQ SOS)
9 04/08/19 08/15/19 (AFIG)
Base Section Headquarters (Established) Base Ports (Opened)
1 Saint-Nazaire (06/24/17)
Camp Montoir (07/19/19)
Les Sables d'Olonne (08/31/17)
Saint-Nazaire(06/22/17)
Nantes (07/11/17)
2 Bordeaux (09/08/17)
Saint-Sulpice (07/04/19)
Bordeaux (08/30/17)
3 Le Havre (08/13/17) Rouen (Sub-Base) (05/25/17)
Le Havre (08/02/17)
3 London (10/02/17) None
4 Le Havre (11/27/17) Rouen (Sub-Base) (05/25/17)
Le Havre (08/02/17)
Calais (Sub-Base)(06/28/18)
5 Brest (11/10/17) Brest (11/10/17)
Cherbourg (Port) (05/25/18)
Granville (Coal Port)
(10/12/18)
6 Marseille (05/30/18) Marseille (05/30/18)
Toulon (Port) (08/25/18)
7 La Pallice (07/09/18)
La Rochelle (07/18/18)
La Pallice (07/09/18)
Rochefort (Port) (01/26/18)
Marans (Port) (08/13/18)
8 Padua (10/22/18) Genoa (Port) (06/14/18)
9 Antwerp (04/08/19) Rotterdam (Sub-Base)
(03/01/19)
Antwerp (03/22/19)

Textual Records: General correspondence, issuances, and historical files of Headquarters Base Section 1, 1917-19 records of section staff officers, 1917-19 and records of section installations at Angers, Camp Coetquidan, Camp de Meucon, Montoir, Nantes, Saint Nazaire, Saumur, Savenay, and Vannes, 1918-19. General correspondence, issuances, and historical files of Headquarters Base Section 2, 1917-19 records of section staff officers, 1917-18 and records of section installations at Camp Ancona, Bassens, Bayonne, Beau Desert, Biarritz, Bordeaux, Coutras, Camp de Souge, Limoges, Pau, Pauillac, Perigueux, and Saint Sulpice, 1918-19. General correspondence, issuances, and historical files of Headquarters Base Section 3, 1917-19 records of section staff officers, 1917-19 records of the U.S. Army Liquidation Mission in England, 1919-20 and records of section installations at Boscombe Down, Sheffield, Slough, and Witney, England, 1918-19. General correspondence, correspondence of the Section Commander, issuances, and historical files, including a section history, of Headquarters Base Section 4, 1917-19 records of section staff officers, 1918-19 and records of section installations at Calais, Le Havre, and Rouen, 1917-19. General correspondence, issuances, and historical files of Headquarters Base Section 5, 1917-19 records of staff officers, 1918-19 and records of section installations at Fort Bouguen, Brest, Cherbourg, Fort Federes, Camp Pontaezen, Camp President Lincoln, Rennes, and Saint Servan, 1918-19. General correspondence, issuances, and historical files of Headquarters Base Section 6, 1918-19 records of section staff officers, 1918-19 and records of section installations at Cannes, Camp d'Ail, Lamalon, Marseille, Miramas, Saint Raphael, and Camp Victor Hugo, 1918-19. General correspondence, telegrams, issuances, and historical files of Headquarters Base Section 7, 1918-19 and records of Headquarters U.S. Troops at La Rochelle-La Pallice and Headquarters U.S. Troops at Rochefort, 1918-19. General correspondence, telegrams, and historical files of Headquarters Base Section 8, 1917-19 and records of the U.S. Ambulance Service with the Italian Army, 1918-19.

Maps (13 items): Base Section 1 construction area map, 1918 (1 item). Base Section 2 dock plans, 1918 (6 items), and communication network, 1918 (1 item). Base Section 5 construction plans, 1918 (5 items). SEE ALSO 120.15.

120.8.2 Records of the Intermediate Section

History: Established August 13, 1917, with headquarters, effective September 17, 1917, at Nevers. Served as a transfer point for supplies and services between the various base sections and the Advance Section. Placed under AFIF, September 1, 1919, and discontinued September 25, 1919.

Textual Records: Headquarters general correspondence, 1917-19. Issuances, 1917-19. Historical files, 1917-19. Correspondence, reports, and other records of section staff officers, 1918-19. Records of Intermediate Section installations at Allerey, Blois, Bourges, Chateau du Loir, Chateauroux, Clermont-Ferrand, Cosne, Cour Cheverny, Gievres, Issoudon, La Courtine, La Guerche, La Valbonne, Lyon, Mars-sur-Allier, Mesvres, Montierchaume, Nevers, Noyers, Pacy-sur-Armancon, Tours, Verneuil, Vichy, and Vouvray, 1918-19. Records of the American Embarkation Center, Le Mans, 1918-19. Records of the First Replacement Depot, Saint Aignan, 1917-19.

120.8.3 Records of the Advance Section

History: Established at Nevers, July 4, 1917. Responsible for delivering supplies from Intermediate Section and the various base sections to combat forces immediately behind the front lines. Headquarters transferred successively to Is-sur-Tille, September 17, 1917 Neufchateau, November 1, 1917 Langres, January 20, 1918 Nogent-en-Bassigny, June 15, 1918 Neufchateau, October 23, 1918 and Is-sur-Tille, June 12, 1919. Transferred to AFIF upon discontinuation of SOS, September 1, 1919. Absorbed by AFIF, October 8, 1919.

Textual Records: Headquarters general correspondence, 1917-19. Issuances, 1917-19. Correspondence and other records of section staff officers, 1917-19. Historical file, 1917-19. Records of Advance Section installations at Bar-le-Duc, Bazoilles, Beaune, Besancon, Briey, Chaumont, Commercy, Dijon, Gondrecourt, Is-sur- Tille, Joinville, Jonchery, Langres, Le Valdahon, Lieusaint, Liffol-le-Grand, Luxembourg, Nancy, Neufchateau, Rimaucourt, Saint Dizier, Souilly, Toul, and Vittel, 1917-19.

Maps (1 item): Construction progress chart, Advance Section engineer, 1918. SEE ALSO 120.15.

120.8.4 Records of the District of Paris

History: American forces in the Paris area formally designated for purposes of discipline and general administration as U.S. Troops in Paris, November 3, 1917. Command vested initially in assistant provost marshal. Made separate command under LOC, December 3, 1917. Superseded by District of Paris, SOS, May 6, 1918. Geographically within, but independent of, Intermediate Section. Transferred to AFIF, September 1, 1919. Discontinued, October 7, 1919.

Textual Records: Correspondence of Headquarters U.S. Troops in Paris, 1917-18 and of the Assistant Provost Marshal, U.S. Troops in Paris, 1917-18. Correspondence of Headquarters District of Paris, 1918-19. District issuances, 1918-19. Correspondence and other records of district staff officers and headquarters units, 1918-19. Records of district installations at Clichy, Clignancourt Barracks, Corbeil-Essonnes, La Roquette, and Neuilly, 1918-19.

120.9 RECORDS OF AEF TACTICAL UNITS
1917-22 (bulk 1917-19)
3,983 lin. ft.

History: AEF combat forces organized into 3 armies, 9 army corps, 43 divisions, and various tactical units.

120.9.1 Records of the First-Third Armies

History: First Army organized, August 10, 1918, implementing General Order 12, Headquarters AEF, July 24, 1918 discontinued, effective with formation of embarkation detachments at Marseille, April 30, 1919, pursuant to General Order 68, Headquarters AEF, April 19, 1919. Second Army headquarters established September 20, 1918 organization announced by GHQ AEF, October 10, 1918 dissolved, April 15, 1919, with headquarters embarkation at Marseille, April 22, 1919. Third Army established pursuant to General Order 198, Headquarters AEF, November 7, 1918, with formal organization effective November 15, 1918 discontinued, July 2, 1919, with headquarters, personnel, and component units redesignated American Forces in Germany (SEE 120.11), July 3, 1919.

Textual Records: Records of the First Army, including headquarters general correspondence, issuances, and historical files, 1918-19 records of general staff elements G-1 through G- 5, 1918-19 correspondence and other records of the inspector general and judge advocate, 1918-19 records of the chief of the Air Service, including records of the 1st-3d Pursuit Groups and the Observation Group, 1918-19 records of the chief of artillery, including records of First Army Artillery and First Army Artillery Park, 1918-19 and records of the chief engineer, chief ordnance officer, provost marshal, chief quartermaster, and chief surgeon, 1917-19. Records of the Second Army, including headquarters general correspondence, issuances, and historical files, 1918-19 records of miscellaneous headquarters units, 1918-19 correspondence of the adjutant general and inspector general, 1918-19 records of the 4th and 5th Pursuit Groups (Air Service) and Second Army Observation Group, 1918-19 correspondence of the chief of artillery, 1918-19, including the Anti-Aircraft Service and the Second Army Artillery Park, 1918 correspondence and other records of the chief surgeon, 1917-19 and correspondence of the chief of the chemical warfare service, chief of engineers, chief ordnance officer, provost marshal, and chief signal officer, 1918-19. Records of the Third Army, including headquarters general correspondence, issuances, and historical files, 1918-19 records of miscellaneous headquarters units, 1918-19 correspondence of the personnel adjutant, 1918- 19 investigation reports, intelligence summaries, and an office history of the inspector general, 1918-19 records of the civil affairs officer, 1918-19 correspondence of the chief engineer, provost marshal, chief signal officer, and chief surgeon, 1918- 19 and records of miscellaneous units and organizations at Fortress Asterstein, 1918-20, and at Coblenz, Neuwied, and Trier, Germany, 1919.

Maps (1,650 items): First Army maps, including general maps, 1917-18 (90 items) G-1 circulation, road, billeting, and position maps, 1918 (51 items) G-2 and G-2-C enemy order of battle, intelligence summary, information, frontline, and related maps, 1918 (398 items) G-3 operations, frontline, and situation maps, 1918 (259 items) artillery maps, 1918 (95 items) and miscellaneous maps, 1918, of the inspector general (1 item), chief engineer (49 items), chief gas officer (13 items), and chief signal officer (3 items). Second Army maps, including map relating to the march into Germany, 1918 (1 item) G-1 circulation, area, and billeting maps, 1918 (4 items) G-2 and G- 2-C enemy order of battle, information, and related maps, 1918-19 (88 items) G-3 situation, line, and area maps, 1918-19 (145 items) railway and highway maps produced by the chief engineer, 1918 (4 items) and miscellaneous informational maps, 1918-19 (25 items). Third Army maps, including G-2 and G-2-C enemy order of battle, location, and related maps and materials, 1918-19 (191 items) G-3 operations and situation maps, 1918-19 (180 maps) an Air Service situation map, 1919 (1 item) engineer road and railroad maps and town plans, 1918-19 (12 items) Signal Service communications maps, 1919 (15 items) and miscellaneous maps, 1918-19 (25 items). SEE ALSO 120.15.

120.9.2 Records of I-IX Corps

History: I-IX Corps were distributed among the three AEF field armies, and were reassigned as operational requirements dictated. They were organized and discontinued as noted below:

Corps Organized Discontinued
I 1/15/18 3/25/19
II 3/19/18 2/1/19
III 3/30/18 7/1/19 (III Corps elements to AFIG)
IV 6/10/18 5/11/19
V 7/7/18 3/5/19
VI 7/23/18 4/11/19
VII 8/6/18 5/11/19 (VII Corps elements to Third Army)
VIII 11/18/18 4/20/19
IX 11/16/18 5/5/19

Textual Records: Records of I Corps, 1918-19, including headquarters general correspondence, issuances, and historical files records of the adjutant general and judge advocate and records of the engineer, motor transport officer, ordnance officer, signal officer, and surgeon. Records of II Corps, 1918- 19, including headquarters general correspondence, issuances, and historical files records of the adjutant general and records of the surgeon and corps artillery park. Records of III Corps, 1918- 19, including headquarters general correspondence, issuances, and historical files G-1 and G-2 Topographical Section correspondence records of the adjutant general, personnel adjutant, and judge advocate and records of the engineer, chief gas officer, signal officer, surgeon, and corps artillery park. Records of IV Corps, 1918-19, including headquarters general correspondence, issuances, and historical files correspondence and telegrams of G-1 through G-4 records of the adjutant general, personnel adjutant, statistical section, and judge advocate and records of the Military Police Company, miscellaneous technical staff elements, and the corps artillery park. Records of V Corps, 1918-19, including headquarters general correspondence, issuances, and historical files correspondence and other records of G-1 through G-3, correspondence of the personnel adjutant, correspondence of the inspector, and reports of division inspectors and records of the engineer, other miscellaneous technical staff elements, and the corps artillery park. Records of VI Corps, 1918-19, including headquarters general correspondence, issuances, and historical files correspondence of the Statistical Section and records of miscellaneous technical staff elements. Records of VII Corps, 1918-19, including headquarters general correspondence, issuances, and historical files G-1 correspondence correspondence and other records of the personnel adjutant, inspector, judge advocate, and message center and records of the Motor Transport Office, Military Police Company, provost marshal, and ordnance officer. Records of VIII Corps, 1918-19, including headquarters general correspondence, issuances, and historical files and records of the engineer, motor transport officer, quartermaster, and corps artillery park. Records of IX Corps, 1918-19, including headquarters general correspondence, issuances, and historical files records of G-1 and records of the quartermaster and signal officer.

Maps (728 items): I Corps maps, 1918, including G-1 circulation maps (9 items) G-2 frontline, enemy order of battle, and information maps (60 items) G-2-C base and trench maps and town plans (20 items) G-3 operations and situation maps (20 items) and artillery (27 items), air service (2 items), engineer (4 items), and signal (6 items) maps. II Corps maps, 1918, produced by G-2 (7 items) G-3 (17 items) and the chief engineer (2 items). III Corps maps, including G-1 circulation and billeting maps, 1918-19 (11 items) G-2 enemy order of battle and information maps, 1918 (35 items) miscellaneous G-2-C printed maps, 1918-19 (17 items) G-3 operations and situation maps, 1918-19 (68 items) and maps illustrating communications networks, 1918-19 (13 items), and enemy artillery activity, 1918 (15 items). IV Corps maps, including G-2 enemy order of battle and information maps, 1918 (63 items), and a survey of German defenses, 1919 (36 items) G-2-C printed base, town, and miscellaneous maps, 1918-19 (19 items) G-3 operations and situation maps, 1918 (23 items) artillery maps, 1918 (5 items) and maps of communications networks, 1918-19 (2 items). V Corps maps, 1918, including G-1 circulation and administration maps (4 items) G-2 enemy order of battle, information, and miscellaneous maps (51 items) G-2-C printed maps (16 items) G-3 operations maps (16 items) artillery operations maps (19 items) and an engineer billeting map (1 item). VI corps maps, including maps produced by G-2, 1918 (3 items), and G-3, 1918-19 (7 items) and enemy artillery situation maps, 1918 (3 items). VII Corps maps, 1918-19, including maps produced by G-2 and G-2-C (9 items), G-3 situation maps (94 items) and position and area maps (7 items) an engineer railroad map (1 item) and communications network maps (6 items). VIII Corps maps, 1918-19, produced by G-1 (2 items), G-2 (6 items), and G-3 (1 item). IX Corps G-2 operations map, 1918 (1 item). SEE ALSO 120.15.

120.9.3 Records of combat divisions

History: Forty-three numbered divisions saw service with the AEF in Europe, with 1st-8th Divisions composed of Regular Army units, 26th-42d composed of state National Guard units, and 76th-93d composed of National Army units. The latter constituted units organized by the Federal Government for the war. Additional divisions (9th-20th and 94th-102d) were raised for the AEF but did not see overseas service.

Textual Records: For each AEF division, headquarters general correspondence, issuances, and historical files records of general, administrative, and technical staff elements and records of miscellaneous units, 1917-19.

Microfilm Publications: M819.

Maps (1,389 items): Report, situation, and miscellaneous maps, 1918-19, of the following divisions: 1st (138 items), 2d (280 items), 3d (73 items), 4th (28 items), 5th (19 items), 6th (7 items), 7th (24 items), 26th (88 items), 27th (24 items), 28th (39 items), 29th (11 items), 30th (9 items), 31st (1 item), 32d (32 items), 33d (141 items), 35th (14 items), 36th (32 items), 37th (22 items), 41st (5 items), 42d (113 items), 77th (112 items), 78th (35 items), 79th (11 items), 80th (25 items), 81st (15 items), 82d (20 items), 83d (3 items), 88th (5 items), 89th (16 items), 90th (19 items), 91st (16 items), and 92d (12 items). SEE ALSO 120.15.

120.9.4 Records of other tactical units

Textual Records: Records of the 1st-321st Ammunition Trains, 1917-21 1st-317th Trench Mortar Artillery Batteries, 1917-19 1st-9th Trench Mortar Artillery Battalions, 1917-19 30th-64th Artillery Brigades, 1917-19 and 1st-172d Field Artillery Brigades, 1917-19. Records of the 1st Cavalry Brigade, 1917-19. Records of the lst Gas Regiment, 1918-22. Records of Headquarters and Military Police, 1st-322d Division Trains, 1917-19. Records of the 1st-319th Engineer Trains, 1917-19 and 464th-488th Engineer Pontoon Trains, 1918-19. Records of the 1st-192d Infantry Brigades, 1917-19 and 1st-816th Pioneer Infantry Regiments, 1917-19. Records of the 1st-366th Machine Gun Battalions, 1917-20. Records of the 1st and 2d GHQ Military Police Battalions, 1918-19 122d-134th Battalions, Military Police Corps, 1918-19 and 2d-308th Military Police Companies, 1918-19. Records of miscellaneous quartermaster units, 1918-19, including butchery companies, clothing and bath units, garden service companies and detachments, pack trains, refrigeration units, salvage units, and supply trains. Records of the 1st-622d Field Signal Battalions, 1917-22. Records of the Tank Corps, 1918-19.

Maps (10 items): Tank Corps operations, 1918. SEE ALSO 120.15.

120.10 RECORDS OF THE AMERICAN FORCES IN FRANCE
1919-20
79 lin. ft.

History: Established, effective September 1, 1919, by General Order 88, Headquarters AEF, August 22, 1918, as successor to AEF for all personnel, except those previously designated American Forces in Germany. Consisted of former SOS units. Abolished January 8, 1920.

Textual Records: AFIF headquarters general correspondence, telegrams, and embarkation orders, 1919-20. Headquarters cablegrams, memorandums, and other issuances, 1919. G-1 correspondence, 1919-20. Correspondence of the inspector general and the judge advocate, 1919-20 and of technical staff elements, including the chief signal officer, chief ordnance officer, and ordnance liaison officer, 1919-20, and chief surgeon, 1919. Correspondence of the Visitors' Bureau, Headquarters Commandant, Base Section 1, District of Paris Military Police Detachment, and Advance Section, 1919 and of Army Service Corps, and Base Section 5, 1919-20.

120.11 RECORDS OF THE AMERICAN FORCES IN GERMANY
1918-23
745 lin. ft.

History: Established July 3, 1919, replacing Third Army (SEE 120.9.1). Functioned as American Army of Occupation (AMAROC) until abolished January 1, 1923.

120.11.1 General records

Textual Records: General correspondence, 1919-23, with record cards and indexes. Cablegrams, 1919-23, and courier cablegrams, 1919-20, to the adjutant general. Telegrams, 1919-23. Historical files, 1919-23. Issuances, 1919-23.

Maps (5 items): Situation maps, 1919 (3 items). Sector and boundary maps, 1919 (2 items). SEE ALSO 120.15.

120.11.2 Records of the general staff

Textual Records: General correspondence, telegrams, and issuances of G-1, 1919-23. Records of G-2, including general correspondence, 1919-23 correspondence of the Secret Service Division, 1919-22 military intelligence studies, 1919-23 and records relating to The AMAROC News, 1919-23. G-3 historical files, 1919-23 and interallied defense plans, 1920-22.

120.11.3 Records of the administrative staff

Textual Records: Correspondence and other records of the adjutant general, inspector general, and judge advocate, 1919-23. General correspondence, reports, and other records of the officer in charge of civil affairs, 1919-23. Records of the American liaison officers with the British and French Armies of the Rhine, 1919- 23. Records of the Inter-Allied Rhineland High Commission, including reports of the American representative to the Secretary of State, 1920-23. Records of the Port of Antwerp Commander, 1919-22 and of the Office of the Commandant at Coblenz, 1918-23. Records of the Headquarters Detachment, 1st and 2d Brigades, and the Casual Depot, 1919-23.

120.11.4 Records of the technical staff

Textual Records: Correspondence and other records of the chief engineer, 1918-23. Correspondence and occupation cost reports of the finance officer, 1919-23, including minutes and other records of Allied committees and conferences on occupation costs, 1920- 22. Records of the chief ordnance officer, 1919-23. Records of the provost marshal, including general correspondence of the Division of Criminal Investigation, 1919-23 and registers of military personnel, 1920-22, and civilians, 1919-20, arrested at Coblenz and Andernach. Records of the quartermaster and chief signal officer, 1919-23. Records of the chief surgeon, including records of the military hospital at Coblenz, 1919-23. Records of miscellaneous units, including the Military Prison (Coblenz) and Disciplinary Barracks (Feste Alexander), 1919-22.

120.12 RECORDS OF THE AMERICAN POLISH RELIEF EXPEDITION
1919-21
4 lin. ft.

History: Organized from AEF units in France in 1919 at the suggestion of U.S. Food Administrator Herbert Hoover. Operated mobile units that conducted delousing and sanitation activities to combat a typhus epidemic in Poland.

Textual Records: General correspondence, telegrams, and historical files, 1919-20. Issuances, 1919-20. Rosters and returns, 1919-21. Records of the chief surgeon, 1919-20. Records of the Wilno Detachment, 1920. Headquarters issuances, Post of Zegrze, 1920.

120.13 RECORDS OF THE AMERICAN EXPEDITIONARY FORCES, NORTH RUSSIA

1917-19
14 lin. ft.

History: Established as Murmansk Expedition, August 8, 1918, from American forces authorized by President Wilson, July 17, 1918, and selected by General Pershing, July 30, 1918. Participated in Allied operations to defend supply lines in the Archangel- Murmansk area from Communist forces. Redesignated American North Russia Expeditionary Forces, September 12, 1918, and AEF, North Russia, April 9, 1919. Discontinued upon withdrawal of last American military units, August 5, 1919.

Textual Records: Headquarters general correspondence, issuances, and historical file, 1918-19. Correspondence of the inspector general and judge advocate, 1918-19. Records of the chief surgeon, including records of medical units, 1918-19. Passenger lists, North Russia troopships, 1918-19. Company rosters of the 339th Infantry and 310th Engineers, and weekly rosters of officers, April-May 1919. Records of Headquarters, U.S. Troops at Archangel, 1918-19. Records of the chief of the American Military Mission to Russia, 1917-19.

Microfilm Publications: M924.

120.14 RECORDS OF U.S. REPRESENTATIVES TO WORLD WAR I
INTERNATIONAL BODIES
1917-28 (bulk 1917-25)
74 lin. ft.

120.14.1 Records of the Supreme War Council

History: Established at the Rapallo Conference, November 7, 1917, by representatives of Great Britain, France, and Italy U.S. participation began 10 days later. Prepared policy recommendations concerning conduct of the war.

Textual Records: Minutes, records of the American Section, and historical files, 1917-19.

Microfilm Publications: M923.

120.14.2 Records of the American Section of the Military Board of
Allied Supply (MBAS)

History: MBAS established at the suggestion of General Pershing and General Purchasing Agent Brig. Gen. Charles G. Dawes to ensure Allied logistic cooperation. Initial meeting, June 28, 1918. Prepared comparative studies concerning Allied and German logistic practices, 1919-22.

Textual Records: Minutes of MBAS and its editorial subcommittee, 1918-22. Correspondence, 1918-28, with registers. Miscellaneous administrative records, 1918-25. Studies and reports on transportation and supply problems, 1918-19. Records collected in studying German logistic practices, 1919-21. Preliminary and final drafts, 1924-25, of the MBA's final report, a comparative study of Allied logistic practices.

120.14.3 Records of the American Military Mission at British
General Headquarters

Textual Records: Correspondence of American officers attached to British Expeditionary Forces (BEF) headquarters, 1917-19. Reports of American casualties with the BEF, 1918-19.

120.14.4 Records of the American Military Mission at French
General Headquarters

Textual Records: Correspondence with AEF General Headquarters, 1917-19, and with French General Headquarters, 1918-19.

120.14.5 Records of the American Military Mission to Italy

Textual Records: Correspondence and reports, 1917-19.

120.14.6 Records of the American Section of the Permanent
International Armistice Commission (PIAC)

History: PIAC composed of American, British, French, Belgian, and German officers. Proposed measures for the execution of Armistice terms that concerned repatriating Allied civilians and war prisoners, protecting civilians and civil and military property in areas evacuated by the Germans, maintaining communications and transportation facilities, and delivering German war materials, locomotives, rolling stock, and trucks.

Textual Records: Daily PIAC minutes, minutes and other records of PIAC subcommittees, and Prisoner of War Subcommittee minutes and bulletins, 1918-19. Records of the American commissioner to the Inter-Allied Commission on the Repatriation of Prisoners of War, 1918-19. Final PIAC report, 1919. Correspondence, 1918-19, and telegrams, 1919, of the American section and representative. Correspondence of the Belgian, 1918-20, and British and French, 1918-19, sections. Correspondence of American troop detachments at prisoner-of-war camps, concerning Russian war prisoners and war prisoner repatriation, 1919. Records of the U.S. Military Mission to Berlin, including headquarters correspondence, Medical Department records, the final report of the Chief of Mission, and medical detachment inspection reports, 1919.

120.14.7 Records of the American Commission to Negotiate Peace

History: Organized by President Wilson, 1918, to represent the United States at the Paris Peace Conference.

Textual Records: Reports concerning European countries submitted to the commission by consuls and military attaches, 1919. Special commission orders, 1919. Daily reports from GHQ G-2-B to Gen. Tasker H. Bliss, correspondence and orders of the commission's headquarters battalion, and other reports, 1918-19.

Related Records: Records of the American Commission to Negotiate Peace, RG 256.

120.15 CARTOGRAPHIC RECORDS (GENERAL)
1848-1924 (bulk 1917-19)
15,168 items

Maps: Miscellaneous operations frontline area and boundary order of battle artillery and antiaircraft road, railroad, and bridge enemy information occupation and related maps, 1918-19 (2,858 items). Belgian maps, 1911-20 (478 items). British maps, 1909-19 (1,720 items). French maps, 1884-1924 (5,870 items). Italian maps, 1895-1919 (541 items). Austro-Hungarian Empire maps, 1894-1917 (134 items). German maps, 1848-1920 (3,324 items). Maps of Siberia, 1918-19 (27 items). Commercially published maps of Europe, 1917-23 (56 items). Organization and statistical charts relating to the AEF, 1917-22 (60 items). Related records, including maps, indexes, card files, lists, and studies, 1918-20 (100 items).

SEE Maps UNDER 120.2.1, 120.3.1-120.3.5, 120.4.1, 120.4.2, 120.5.1, 120.5.3, 120.6, 120.7.5-120.7.8, 120.8.1, 120.8.3, 120.9.1-120.9.4, and 120.11.1. SEE Architectural and Engineering Plans UNDER 120.4.5 and 120.7.7. SEE Aerial Photographs UNDER 120.3.2, 120.4.1, and 120.5.1.

Finding Aids: Franklin W. Burch, comp., Preliminary Inventory of the Cartographic Records of the American Expeditionary Forces, 1917-21, PI 165 (1966).

120.16 STILL PICTURES (GENERAL)
1915-20
4,759 images

Photographic Prints (4,640 images): Recipients of Allied valor awards, 1917-19 (AC, 1,688 images). Training program of the 116th Engineers, in album, by Capt. H.B. Boise, 1918 (HB, 383 images). Quartermaster oil and gasoline storage facilities in France and Belgium, in album, 1918-19 (GO, 49 images). Areas of France and Belgium occupied by American troops, taken under supervision of Capt. T.J. Griffin, 1918-19 (G, 2,262 images). Effects of Allied bombing, 1915-18 (AB, 190 images). AEF Memorial Day ceremonies in France, 1920 (AEFC, 68 images).

Glass Negatives (42 images): Inter-Allied marksmanship competition, Belgium, 1919 (RPM).

Posters (77 images): Miscellaneous World War I recruiting, conservation, and propaganda posters, ca. 1915-19 (WP).

SEE Photographic Prints UNDER 120.3.5 and 120.5.1.

Bibliographic note: Web version based on Guide to Federal Records in the National Archives of the United States. Compiled by Robert B. Matchette et al. Washington, DC: National Archives and Records Administration, 1995.
3 volumes, 2428 pages.

This Web version is updated from time to time to include records processed since 1995.


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General Records of the Department of the Navy, 1798-1947

Established: By an act of April 30, 1798 (1 Stat. 553).

Predecessor Agencies:

Abolished: By the National Security Act of 1947 (61 Stat. 495), July 26, 1947.

Successor Agencies: Department of the Navy, National Military Establishment (1947-49) Department of the Navy, Department of Defense (1949- ).

Finding Aids: James R. Masterson, comp., "Preliminary Checklist of the General Records of the Department of the Navy, 1804-1944," PC 31 (1945) supplement in National Archives microfiche edition of preliminary inventories.

Security-Classified Records: This record group may include material that is security-classified.

Related Records:

Record copies of publications of the Department of the Navy and its components in RG 287, Publications of the U.S. Government.
Records of the Office of the Chief of Naval Operations, RG 38.
Naval Records Collection of the Office of Naval Records and Library, RG 45.
Records of the Judge Advocate General (Navy), RG 125.
General Records of the Department of the Navy, 1947- , RG 428.

80.2 Records of the Office of the Secretary of the Navy
1804-1950

History: Created by the act establishing the Department of the Navy (1 Stat. 553), April 30, 1798. Reduced to subcabinet status by the National Security Act of 1947 (61 Stat. 495), July 26, 1947.

Related Records: Additional OSN records in RG 45, Naval Records Collection of the Office of Naval Records and Library.

80.2.1 General records

Textual Records: Marine Corps letters sent, 1804-86, and received, 1828-86. Letters sent, 1858-86. Microfilm copy of letters sent, 1942-43 (20 rolls), and received, 1942-47 (503 rolls). General correspondence, 1885-1940. Indexes and registers, 1862-1947. Index to courts-martial correspondence, 1908-26. Correspondence relating to naval stations at Cavite and Olangapo, Philippine Islands Culebra and San Juan, PR Guam Guantanamo, Cuba Honolulu, HI Midway Island and Tutuila, Samoa, 1902-11. Records of the Commission on Navy Yards and Naval Stations, 1916- 19. Reports of the Navy Alaskan Coal Commission, 1919-22. Minutes of the Council of the Secretary of the Navy, 1921-25. Records of Secretary Frank Knox, 1940-44. Formerly security-classified and unclassified records of James V. Forrestal, Under Secretary (1940-44) and Secretary (1944-47), consisting of correspondence, 1946-47 a reference file, 1945-48 and records relating to meetings of the Top Policy Group, 1944-50, and the Committee of Three (Secretaries of State, War, and the Navy), 1945-47.

Microfilm Publications: M181, M971, M1052, M1067, M1092, M1140, M1141.

Related Records: Additional records of the Commission on Navy Yards and Naval Stations under 80.7.2 and of the Navy Alaskan Coal Commission under 80.8.3.

Subject Access Terms: National Morale, Committee for.

80.2.2 Directives

Textual Records: Directives, 1862-1941. General orders, 1863-98. Regulations, 1865-1948. Memorandums to bureaus and offices, 1882- 1934. Orders and circulars, 1893-1913. General orders, 1913-44. Changes to navy regulations and instructions, 1913-44. General circulars ("ALNAV"), 1918-43, and circulars to naval shore establishments ("ALNAVSTA"), 1921-41.

80.2.3 Records relating to personnel

History: Personnel functions vested in the Office of the Secretary of the Navy, with assistance of Board of Navy Commissioners, 1815-42, until departmental reorganization under an act of July 5, 1862 (12 Stat. 510), created the Bureau of Equipment and Recruiting, with responsibility for enlisted personnel. Assignment of officers vested in Office of Detail, established March 1861 in the Office of the Secretary, and transferred, April 1865, to Bureau of Navigation (renamed Bureau of Naval Personnel, 1942), which acquired responsibility for enlisted personnel from Bureau of Equipment and Recruiting in departmental reorganization of June 30, 1889, pursuant to General Order 372, Navy Department, June 25, 1889. Functions relating to civilian personnel were retained by the Office of the Secretary of the Navy under the supervision of the Chief Clerk.

Textual Records: Acceptances of commissions by Marine Corps officers, 1808-62. Copies of commissions and warrants, 1848-96. Records relating to civilian employees, including correspondence of the Chief Clerk, 1886-1910, with index, 1893-1913 letters of appointment, applications, and decisions, 1889-1911 records of nominations, confirmations, oaths, and resignations, 1897-1909 notices of appointment, 1904-11 and records of accidents in navy yards and naval stations, 1908-11, 1923-40. Returns and other records relating to civilian employees at shore establishments, 1887-1939. Lists, 1917-39, and service records, 1917-23, of civilian employees. Records of retired civilian employees, 1920- 35.

Related Records: Records of the Bureau of Naval Personnel, RG 24.

80.2.4 Fiscal records

Textual Records: Letters received by the disbursing clerk, 1868- 71. Circulars, orders, and accounts, 1877-85. Notices to the Fourth Auditor, 1886-96. Letters sent, 1901-16. Bills, 1853-1906. Statements of receipts and expenditures, 1849-59, 1871-94. Disbursement ledgers, 1882-1914. Estimates and appropriations, 1912-22. Quarterly accounts current, 1912-17. Records of offers of land in the District of Columbia, n.d. Miscellaneous financial records, 1911-34.

80.2.5 Records relating to public relations

Textual Records: Correspondence and other records relating to the Trans-Mississippi and International Exposition, Omaha, NE, 1898- 99 Tennessee Centennial Exposition, Nashville, TN, 1897 Pan American Exposition, Buffalo, NY, 1899-1904 South Carolina Interstate and West Indian Exposition, Charleston, SC, 1901-2 Louisiana Purchase Exposition, St. Louis, MO, 1901-5 Lewis and Clark Centennial Exposition, Portland, OR, 1904-6 Alaska-Yukon Pacific Exposition, Seattle, WA, 1908-10 Jamestown Tercentennial Exposition, Norfolk, VA, 1906-11 and Panama-Pacific International Exposition, San Francisco, CA, 1912-16. Records of the John Paul Jones Statue Commission, 1908-12. Records relating to Liberty Loans, 1917. Press releases and transcripts of press conferences and speeches, 1917-36. Letters received concerning a speech on the "Irish Question," 1921.

Motion Pictures: Meeting between President Franklin D. Roosevelt and Prime Minister Winston Churchill, 1941 (8 reels). Battle of Midway, 1942 (2 reels). see also 80.10.

80.3 Records of Units in the Office of the Secretary of the Navy
1891-1947

80.3.1 Records of the Office of the Assistant Secretary of the
Navy

History: Established 1861. Abolished 1869. Reestablished by act of July 11, 1890 (26 Stat. 254). Responsible for the administration of civilian personnel and shore establishments.

Textual Records: Records relating to repairs of ships, 1891-92. Letters and memorandums sent, 1893-1912. Correspondence of the director of navy yards, 1911-15. Alphabetical file, 1916-40. General correspondence, 1921-34. Records of Assistant Secretaries Beekman Winthrop, 1911-13 and Franklin D. Roosevelt, 1913-14. Correspondence of Assistant Secretary Ralph Bard relating to racial discrimination in the navy, 1941-44, including letters from Roy Wilkins and Emmett J. Scott regarding heroism of mess attendants Dorie Miller and William A. Brooks during the attack on Pearl Harbor. Microfilm copy of records of the Assistant Secretary of the Navy for Air, 1927-36 (11 rolls). Records of Assistant Secretary for Air Artemus Gates, relating to such topics as the high school victory corps, foreign aviation, and aircraft manufacturing, 1941-45.

Subject Access Terms: Labor unrest Naval Academy, U.S. naval aviation navy yards, industrial relations Nicaraguan Canal Commission President's Fair Employment Practice Committee Roosevelt, Theodore.

80.3.2 Records of special assistants

Textual Records: Correspondence of Joseph Powell, representative to the Shipbuilding Stabilization Committee, 1940-41. Records of Lt. Cmdr. Ferol D. Overfelt, 1942-43. Correspondence and other records of Joseph W. Barker relating to the War Manpower Commission, 1942-43. Records of Anthony L. Michel relating to a committee on deferment of civilian employees, 1943. Records of Addison Walker relating to racial discrimination in the navy, 1941-43 and to blacks ("Negro Spindle File"), 1942.

80.3.3 Records of the Executive Office of the Secretary of the
Navy

History: Established by direction of the Secretary of the Navy, December 17, 1942. Administered the offices, divisions, and boards created to assist the Secretary and his assistants.

Textual Records: Correspondence relating to procurement, finance, personnel, and legislation, 1946-47.

Subject Access Terms: Army and Navy Munitions Board Correction of Naval Records, Board for Navy Civilian Advisory Committee radar, history of.

80.3.4 Records of other units

Textual Records: Records of the Chief Clerk, including letters sent, 1891-1907 copies of letters sent relating to the Committee on Department Methods ("Keep Commission"), 1905-6 and office file of Chief Clerk Frank S. Curtis, 1900-21. Reports to the general counsel relating to the Mark 15 (Norden) bombsight and the navy transport glider program, 1945.

Related Records: Additional records concerning the Keep Commission under 80.7.1.

80.4 Records of the Office of Research and Inventions
1915-45

History: Established by consolidation of Office of Patents and Inventions (see 80.4.5) and Office of the Coordinator of Research and Development (OCRD, see 80.4.4), May 15, 1945. Superseded by Office of Naval Research under an act of August 1, 1946 (60 Stat. 779). Coordinated naval research, development, and test activities and activities relating to patents, inventions, trademarks, and copyrights.

Related Records: Records of the Office of Naval Research, RG 298.

Subject Access Terms: Council of National Defense Inventions, Board of National Research Council.

80.4.1 Records of the Office of Inventions

History: Established December 1915 as a clearinghouse for ideas and inventions submitted to the Navy Department. Functions consolidated with those of Technical Aide (see 80.4.2) to form Office of Technical Developments, August 1932. see 80.4.3.

Textual Records: Correspondence with the Naval Consulting Board, 1916-21. Reports of Thomas A. Edison, 1917-19. Correspondence of the Aide for Inventions, 1915-19.

Architectural Plans (38 items):Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC, by Thomas A. Edison, 1916. see also 80.9.

80.4.2 Records of the Technical Aide

History: Aide for Inventions appointed as a liaison to the Naval Consulting Board (see 80.4.6), April 1915. Redesignated Technical Aide, February 1921. Functions consolidated with those of Office of Inventions (see 80.4.1) to form Office of Technical Developments, August 1932, with Technical Aide continuing under that office and successor OCRD. see 80.4.3 and 80.4.4.

Textual Records: Correspondence and other records, 1922-44.

80.4.3 Records of the Office of Technical Developments

History: Established by consolidation of functions of Technical Aide and Office of Inventions, August 1932. Redesignated Office of the Coordinator of Research and Development (OCRD), July 12, 1941. see 80.4.4.

Textual Records: General correspondence, 1933-39.

80.4.4 Records of the Office of the Coordinator of Research and
Development

History: Established by redesignation of Office of Technical Developments, July 12, 1941. Consolidated with Office of Patents and Inventions (see 80.4.5) to form Office of Research and Inventions, May 15, 1945.

Textual Records: Inventions case files, 1915-44, with indexes. Correspondence and other records concerning inventions, 1915-34 (333 ft.).

80.4.5 Records of the Office of Patents and Inventions

History: Established October 19, 1941. Consolidated with OCRD (see 80.4.4) to form Office of Research and Inventions, May 15, 1945.

Textual Records: Patent case files, 1918-45. Records relating to German claims resulting from patent infringements, 1918-31. Records and reports relating to interferences, 1893-1942 (bulk 1925-42).

80.4.6 Records of the Naval Consulting Board

History: Organized as a private body by Thomas A. Edison at the request of the Secretary of the Navy, July 1915. Received legislative recognition in the Naval Appropriation Act of August 29, 1916 (39 Stat. 556). Functioned as a civilian advisory board on inventions. Never formally dissolved. Held annual meetings until 1943.

Textual Records: Abstracts of discussions, 1915-18. Indexes to persons and inventions, n.d. Correspondence, 1915-21.

80.4.7 Records of the Board on Submarine Safety and Salvage
("Submarine Board")

History: Established by ALNAV Circular 17, July 11, 1928, to investigate ideas and inventions for improvements in submarines. Report submitted March 22, 1929.

Textual Records: Microfilm copy of case files (10 rolls), with case register (1 roll) minutes of meetings correspondence relating to improvements in submarine safety, rescue, and salvage procedures and other records, 1927-29.

80.5 Records of Other Central Office Staff Organizations
1911-49

80.5.1 Records of the Office of the Director of Naval Petroleum
and Oil-Shale Reserves

History: Naval petroleum and oil shale reserves established in AK, CA, CO, UT, and WY between 1909 and 1924. Administration of the reserves vested in the Secretary of the Interior as trustee for the navy by EO 3447, May 31, 1921. Trusteeship revoked by EO 4614, March 17, 1927. The leasing of reserve lands to oil companies authorized by acts of February 25 and June 4, 1920 (41 Stat. 441 and 813). Lease irregularities led to U.S. Senate investigations beginning October 22, 1923. All activities and records pertaining to naval oil reserves transferred to the Secretary's office, April 12, 1924. Office of the Director of Naval Petroleum and Oil-Shale Reserves established in the Office of the Secretary of the Navy with appointment of Director, April 18, 1924. Court proceedings and investigations continued until April 1937.

Textual Records: Correspondence, 1911-30. Production reports, 1922-28. Records of lawsuits concerning oil leases, 1924-37. Records relating to the receivership of the Mammoth Oil Company, 1922-28. Correspondence of the inspector of reserves in CO, UT, and WY, 1924-28. General file, 1912-45. Transcripts of criminal proceedings against Albert B. Fall, Edward L. Dohney, Edward L. Dohney, Jr., and Harry F. Sinclair, 1925-28. Litigation files, U.S. v. Standard Oil Company of California, 1923-39. Terminated lease and contract files, 1913-46.

Map (1 item): Index diagram of flight lines for aerial photographs of Naval Oil Reserves 1 and 2 in California, composed of Geological Survey topographic sheets of Buena Vista Lake and McKittrick, CA, mounted together and annotated, 1931-32. see also 80.9.

Aerial Photographs (750 items): Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1, Elk Hills, Kern Co., CA, and No. 2, Buena Vista Hills, CA, 1930-31. see also 80.9.

Subject Access Terms: Teapot Dome affair.

80.5.2 Records of the Office of Budget and Reports and its
predecessors

History: Established by an act of August 25, 1941 (55 Stat. 680).

Textual Records: Correspondence and memorandums, 1926-47. Budget estimates, 1941-48. Circulars and bulletins, 1926-45. Records relating to postwar planning, 1945-46 and to Congressional hearings on postwar navy personnel and requirements, 1945-46. Records relating to procurements and contracts, 1941-46.

80.5.3 Records of the Office of Industrial Relations

History: Established September 14, 1945, as a redesignation of the Division of Shore Establishments and Civilian Personnel. Administered navy civilian personnel program, particularly with regard to naval shore establishments.

Textual Records: General correspondence, 1945-46, with name and subject index. General correspondence of the Industrial Manpower Section, 1942-45, with indexes.

80.5.4 Records of the Pearl Harbor Liaison Office

History: Established in the Executive Office of the Secretary, November 1945, to provide information concerning the Pearl Harbor attack from records in the custody of the Navy Department. Discontinued April 1946.

Textual Records: Reference file, 1945-46. Request file, 1945-46. Case files of individuals involved in Pearl Harbor investigations, 1945-46. Formerly security-classified documents received from the Office of the Chief of Naval Operations, 1940- 45, including microfilm copy of message files, 1940-41 (15 rolls). Diplomatic code messages, 1945. Transcripts of hearings, testimony, exhibits, correspondence, reports, and other records of the Roberts Commission, 1941-42 Hart Inquiry, 1944 Pearl Harbor Navy Court of Inquiry, 1944 Hewitt Inquiry, 1945 Army Pearl Harbor Board, 1944 Clausen Investigation, 1945 and Joint Committee on the Investigation of the Pearl Harbor Attack, 1945- 46.

Subject Access Terms: Baecher, Cmdr. John Ford Clausen, Lt. Col. Henry C. Forrestal, Secretary of the Navy James V. Grunert, Lt. Gen. George Hart, Adm. Thomas C. Hewitt, Adm. Henry Kent Roberts, Justice Owen J. Short, Gen. Walter Stark, Adm. Harold "Winds Code."

80.5.5 Records of the Office of Public Relations

History: Established May 1, 1941, under the Secretary of the Navy, succeeding the Public Relations Branch, Naval Intelligence Division, Office of the Chief of Naval Operations. Disseminated public information concerning naval operations.

Textual Records: Alphabetical file, 1940-42. General correspondence, 1946-47. Correspondence of the Director, 1946-47. Correspondence of the Combat Photography Section, 1942-44 and Special Activities Section, 1942-44. Scripts maintained by the Radio Section, 1944-45.

80.5.6 Records of the Office Methods Branch

Textual Records: Correspondence concerning navy records and records management, 1941-47. Card file of boards and committees, 1941-46.

80.5.7 Records of the Office of Procurement and Material

Textual Records: Correspondence concerning military and economic assistance to Russia, 1943-45.

80.5.8 Records of the Office of the Fiscal Director

Textual Records: Correspondence, 1944-45. Joint Navy-War Production Board audit reports of controlled material programs, 1943-45. Records relating to accounting procedures at naval shore establishments, 1944-49.

80.5.9 Records of the Industrial Incentive Division

Textual Records: General correspondence, 1942-45.

80.6 Records of the Compensation Board
1916-41

Textual Records: General file, 1917-31. File copies of printed material received, 1917-41. Records of the Audit Section, 1916- 29 Material Order Section, 1917-29 and Rentals and Plant Extension Section, 1917-36.

80.7 Records of Miscellaneous Committees, Commissions, and Boards
1861-1951

80.7.1 Records of miscellaneous committees

Textual Records: Records of the Civilian Advisory Committee, 1946-48 and the Committee on Department Methods ("Keep Commission"), 1907.

Related Records: Additional records concerning the Keep Commission under 80.3.4.

80.7.2 Records of miscellaneous commissions

Textual Records: Records of the Commission on Navy Yards and Naval Stations, 1919-20 the Commission to Select a Site for a Navy Yard on the Pacific Coast North of the 42d Parallel, 1899 and the Navy Yard Site Commission, 1889.

Charts (47 items): Commission on Navy Yards and Naval Stations annotated Coast Survey and Hydrographic Office charts, showing water depths and anchorage information at harbors proposed for navy use in or on the United States, Puerto Rico, Cuba, Haiti, Dominican Republic, Martinique, Panama, Bermuda, Scotland, Gibraltar, and Hong Kong, 1919. see also 80.9.

Related Records: Additional records of the Commission on Navy Yards and Naval Stations under 80.2.1.

80.7.3 Records of miscellaneous boards

Textual Records: Records of the Board for Uniform Apprenticeship for All Navy Yards, 1899-1920 Board of Decorations and Medals, 1927-42 Board on Additional Vessels, 1885-86 Board on Awards, 1902 Board on Awards to Civil Employees, 1918-42 Board on Auxiliary Vessels, 1898 Board on Business Methods, 1895 Board on Construction, 1889-1909 Board on Hull Changes, 1915-26 Board on Naval Training Station on the Great Lakes, 1902 Board on Navy Yard Organization, 1891 Board on the Care and Preservation of Torpedo Vessels, 1901 Board to Compile the Navy File Manual, 1920-22 Board to Consider Laws Affecting Commissioned Personnel, 1906 Board to Determine Economy of Using Steam with Different Measures of Expansion, 1861 Departmental Wage Boards of Review, 1921-33 Federal Oil Conservation Board, 1925-28 General Board, 1900-51 Gun Foundry Board, 1883-85 Joint Army Navy Board, 1913- 47 Joint Economy Board, 1932-40 Naval Advisory Board, 1882-90 Naval Fuel Oil Board, 1916 Naval War Board, 1898 Naval War Claims Board, 1925-33 Navy Manpower Survey Board, 1943-44 (117 ft.) Procurement Review Board, 1943 and War Contracts Relief Board, 1947-51.

Maps (9 items): General Board map, submitted by U.S.S. Chicago, of Richardson Construction Lands, Yaqui River Valley, Sonora, Mexico, 1913 (1 item). Board for the Inspection of the Administration of the Island of Guam blueprint maps of Guam and its naval station, showing ownership of lands purchased for a coaling station, road and telephone line extensions, water supply and fire extinguishing systems, and channels to be dredged, 1908 (8 items). see also 80.9.

80.8 Records of Field Activities
1905-42

80.8.1 Records of the officer in charge of operating the Federal
Shipbuilding and Drydock Company, Kearny, NJ

Textual Records (in New York): Letters sent, correspondence register, newspaper clippings, reports of interviews and press conferences, auditing records, financial statements, labor cost records, contract summaries, and other records, 1941-42.

80.8.2 Records of the Cost Inspector for the Navy, Todd Dry Dock
and Construction Corporation, Tacoma, WA

Textual Records (in Seattle): Correspondence, 1917-26. Minutes of weekly meetings of the Cost Inspection Board, 1917-24. Daily journals of the Cost Inspection Board, 1917-23 and the Senior Cost Accountant, 1918-23. Financial records, 1916-26. Records relating to work performed, 1916-25. Records relating to material, 1919-25. Miscellaneous records, 1905-24.

80.8.3 Records of the Navy Alaskan Coal Commission

Textual Records (in Anchorage): Records maintained at Chickaloon, AK, relating primarily to the mining and transportation of coal at the Chickaloon and Coal Creek Mines, 1920-22.

Related Records: Additional records of the Navy Alaskan Coal Commission under 80.2.1.

80.9 Cartographic Records (General)
ca. 1900-57

Aerial Photographs: Separated from photographic series G, described below, and consisting of oversized vertical items, with some mosaic items and oblique images, ca. 1900-57 (1,300 items).

see Maps under 80.5.1 and 80.7.3.
see Charts under 80.7.2.
see Architectural Plans under 80.4.1.
see Aerial Photographs under 80.5.1.

80.10 Motion Pictures (General)
1925-45

Wreckage of the navy dirigible U.S.S. Shenandoah (ZR-1), 1925 (1 reel). Medical training in the United States, 1938 (2 reels). Navy activities in World War II, 1942-45 (22 reels).

80.11 Still Pictures (General)
1896-1958

Photographs: Officers and enlisted personnel, 1917-45 (PA, PB 9,000 images). Historical flights, aircraft, air races, expeditions, aviators, secretaries, assistant secretaries, and Presidents, 1896-1940 (HAN, HAP, HAS, HAT 2,138 images). Officers and enlisted men Navy Department personnel aircraft, ships, and boats ordnance training activities air stations, bases, and navy yards harbors and docks foreign navies and dignitaries naval operations during World War II and the Korean War expeditions and surveys and tests, including nuclear bomb tests, ca. 1900-57 (G, GK, CF 750,000 images). Wreckage of dirigible U.S.S. Shenandoah (ZR-1), 1925 (MS, 12 images). Activities of crew of U.S.S. Casablanca, 1943-45 (CASA, 150 images). Subjects from 7th Naval District, Miami, FL, 1943-46 (MF, 8 images). Naval Powder Factory, Indian Head, MD, ca. 1912 (IH, 7 images). Navy and Marine Corps exhibit, Philadelphia Navy Yard, PA, 1926 (ME, 82 images). Activities at naval air stations at Lambert Field, St. Louis, MO, and Hitchcock, TX, 1943-45 (LSM, HT 89 images). Navy and Marine personnel, air fields, and other facilities in foreign countries and the Panama Canal Zone, 1914- 30 (HAG, 150 images). Publicity photographs of personnel, ships, aircraft, and activities, 1921-43 (PR, 600 images). Admirals, commodores, and Col. Charles A. Lindbergh and his 1927 flight to France, 1920-44 (PC, 350 images). Women in the U.S. Army Air Forces, Navy, and Marine Corps, World War II, 1943-45 (PSW, 18 images). Operations and facilities of contract businesses, 1943 (PM, PII 2,700 images). Sinking of French military transport Vinh Long, 1922 (VL, 7 images). Japanese surrender ceremonies, U.S.S. Missouri, ending World War II, 1945 (GJS, 17 images). Shipbuilding and repair plants in AL, CA, CT, DE, FL, HI, LA, ME, MD, MA, NJ, NY, OR, PA, SC, TX, VA, and WA, prepared by Bureau of Aeronautics and used by Machine Tool Section, Shore Establishments Division, 1938 (99 images).

Color Transparencies: Naval operations during World War II and Korea, 1943-58 (GK, 20,000 images). Slide copies of official portraits (1798-1939) of Secretaries of the Navy, 1943 (PS, 53 images).

Stereographs: Visit of the Great White Fleet to Australia, 1908 (AA, 36 images).

Panoramas: Naval oil reserve, Teapot Dome, WY, 1922 (TD, 101 images).

Aerial Oblique Photographs: Houma, LA naval air station, housing and drydocks, Morgan City, LA and views of Fort Livingston, LA, 1943-44 (HL, 58 images).

Bibliographic note: Web version based on Guide to Federal Records in the National Archives of the United States. Compiled by Robert B. Matchette et al. Washington, DC: National Archives and Records Administration, 1995.
3 volumes, 2428 pages.

This Web version is updated from time to time to include records processed since 1995.


How Long Did the Cold War Last?

The Cold War lasted for a total of 45 years. This period of hostility short of open war between the United States and the Soviet Union lasted from 1946 until 1991, according to the National Museum of American History.

The Cold War started when the Soviet Union refused to recognize obligations incurred during World War II, including moving out of the Middle East and allowing Germany to be a free state. When the Soviet Union also acquired nuclear weapons, the two superpowers found themselves in a precariously balanced position. Neither one was willing to move openly for fear that the other would use those weapons. The Cold War spawned multiple small wars and conflicts, and it only ended with the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991.


Watch the video: Hastings-on-Hudson, NY (July 2022).


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