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Boeing-Stearman N2S

Boeing-Stearman N2S


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Boeing-Stearman N2S

The Boeing-Stearman N2S was the designation given to all US Navy versions of the Boeing-Stearman Model 75 Primary Trainer. Stearman had begun work on the X-70 primary trainer in 1933, and had submitted it to the Army in 1934. The Navy had actually been first to order it into production, as the Stearman NS-1. This was powered by surplus Wright J-5 engines and had the Stearman designation of Model 73.

In 1936 the Army ordered the aircraft into production as the PT-13 (Model 75), powered by a Lycoming engine. The Army also ordered a large number of Model 75s powered by Continental engines, as the PT-17.

The US Navy also placed a large number of orders for the Model 75, using both Continental and Lycoming engines. All of these aircraft were designated as the N2S, regardless of the engine type. The S for Stearman designation was retained after Boeing took over the company in 1939. A total of 3,578 N2Ss were built.

The N2S was a two seat single-bay biplane. The fuselage was built around a welded steel tube framework, the wings around a wooden framework, both fabric covered. It had a fixed undercarriage with single faired legs.

N2S-1

The N2S-1 was the designation for aircraft powered by a Continental R-670-14 engine. 250 were produced.

N2S-2

The N2S-2 was powered by a Lycoming R-680-8 engine. 125 were produced and were delivered in April-October 1941.

N2S-3

The N2S-3 was powered by a Continental R-670-4 engine. A total of 1,875 were produced, making it the most numerous of the Naval trainers.

N2S-4

The N2S-4 was powered by a 220hp Continental R-670-5 engine and had the PT-13A fuselage. The Navy ordered 577. Of these the first 99 came from Army orders for the PT-17 and the last 122 were cancelled, for a total of 455.

N2S-5

The N2S-5 was the first common Army and Navy version and appeared in 1942. It used a PT-13A airframe and a Lycoming R-680-17 engine. The Navy received 873 while the Army got 894, and gave them the PT-13D designation. Boeing kept the last one, for a total 1,768. Deliveries began in July 1943 and ended soon after V-J Day when all remaining orders were cancelled.

Boeing-Stearman N2S-5 (Model E-75)
Engine: Avco Lycoming R-680-17 radial piston engine
Power: 220hp
Crew: 2
Span: 32ft 2in
Length: 25ft 0.25in
Height: 9ft 2in
Empty Weight: 1,936lb
Maximum Take-off Weight: 2,717lb
Maximum Speed: 124mph
Cruising Speed: 106mph
Ceiling: 11,200ft
Range: 505 miles


Boeing-Stearman N2S - History

With its takeover of the Stearman Company in Wichita, Kansas in 1934, the Boeing Corporation also acquired the right to produce Stearman's aircraft designs. The one destined to become the most successful was a sturdy biplane trainer which had been designed by Harold Zipp and Jack Clark.

Beginning production as the Boeing Model 75, eventually 10,346 "Kaydets" were built between 1934 and February, 1945 - the largest production run of any biplane in history. The Canadians first named the plane "Kaydet", and it was eventually officially adopted by all services and nations. Never-the-less, the venerable aircraft is universally better known as the "Stearman", today.

The "Kaydet" became the best known primary trainer of World War II. These were aircraft which were docile enough to help a pilot solo after only eight hours of flying time, yet were enough of a challenge to "separate the men from the boys". Its simple but rugged construction made it ideal as a trainer despite a design that was somewhat outdated by the onset of World War II.

Although considered the most stable and maneuverable of the primary trainers, the "Kaydet's" narrow landing gear gave it a tendency to "ground loop", especially in the hands of a nervous recruit in windy conditions.

Altogether "Kaydets" provided the first flying time for more than 60,000 Americans during the Second World War.

In addition to the "Kaydets" delivered to the US Army (designated PT-13, PT-17, or PT-18, depending on the installed engine) and US Navy (designated N2S), Boeing also sold the trainer to Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Canada, China, Colombia, Cuba, The Dominican Republic, Guatemala, Paraguay, Peru, The Philippines, and Venezuela for both civilian and military uses.

By the late 1940's, because of their slow, low-level flying capabilities, more than 4,000 of these aircraft were purchased as surplus and converted to crop dusters and sprayers. Many others were used to provide flight instruction to post-war civilian pilots. Today more than 1,000 are still airworthy, being flown at small airports and at airshows throughout the country and overseas. Hundreds more are on static display in museums around the world.

You can take a thrilling flight in our beautifully restored Stearman N2S-1/PT-17 "Kaydet" during Airplane Ride Weekends at the Mid-Atlantic Air Museum or during our annual World War II Weekend. Push the button at the bottom of this page for more information.

SPECIFICATIONS

Engine: Continental W670 radial engine of 220 HP or
Lycoming R-680 radial engine of 225 HP


Boeing-Stearman N2S - History

The Boeing/Stearman Model 75 primary trainer is probably the best known bi-plane in aviation history. Commonly referred to as the Stearman PT-17, it was manufactured by the Stearman Aircraft Co. in Wichita, KS, from 1934 through 1945. Boeing publicity claims a total of 10,346 Stearman “Kaydet” trainers built, but this figure includes equivalent spare parts. The actual total of Model 75s that were completed from the prototype X-75 to the final E75 built in 1945 was 8428.

In 1938 the Stearman Aircraft Co. became the Stearman Aircraft Division of the Boeing Aircraft Co., so in actuality, the majority of the airplanes manufactured were designated as Boeings. However, they are still almost universally known as Stearmans.

Generally, all the Stearman airframes built are the same with the only major difference being the engine installed. Original engines included the Lycoming R-680 (225 hp) Continental R-670 (220 hp) and the Jacobs R-755 (225 hp). Post-war modifications include the Lycoming R-680 (300 hp), Pratt & Whitney R-985 (450 hp) and the Jacobs R-775 (275 hp).

The propellers generally in use on Stearmans are the Sensenich wooden prop the ground adjustable McCauley steel blade prop and the fixed pitch Hamilton Standard propeller.

The Stearmans manufactured for the U.S. Army Air Corps were the PT-13 PT-13A PT-13B PT-17 PT-18 PT-27 and PT-13D. The U.S. Navy airplanes were the N2S-1 -2 -3 -4 and -5. The primary difference between the Army and Navy airplanes, other than engines installed, was the tail wheel. Army airplanes had a fully steerable tail wheel while the Navy airplanes were equipped with a full swivel type with a lock. Most Stearmans today have subsequently been modified with the steerable tail wheel.

The final version of the Stearman was the E75, designated PT-13D/N2S-5. It was the only complete standardization of an Army and Navy production design during World War II and was totally the same for both services.

Post-war civil requirements for surplus military Stearmans is covered by Aircraft Specification A-743. This document lists all the approved equipment allowed on a standard category Stearman and the items that must have been removed, replaced or modified when the military surplus Stearman was first licensed as a civilian airplane.

Stearman Model 75 Designations

Model Military Designation Engine

A75 PT-13B Lycoming R-680-11

A75L5 To various foreign countries

A75N1 PT-17 Continental R-670-4 & -5

A75N1 N2S-1 Continental R-670-4

A75N1 N2S-2 Lycoming R-680-8

A75N1 N2S-4 Continental R-670-4 & -5

B75N1 N2S-3 Continental R-670-4

D75N1 PT-27 Continental R-670
To Canada

E75 PT-13D/N2S-5 Lycoming R-680-17

Engine note: It was required that all Continental R-670 engines, when transferred to civilian use, be re-designated and have the engine identification plate changed to show the civilian designation.

Military Designation Civilian Designation

Aircraft Specifications

Gross Weight – 2950 lb.
Maximum Baggage – 60 lb.
Fuel – 46 gal. (gravity feed) (4-7 gal. not available in flight)
Oil – 4.4 gal.
Power Off Stall Speed – 55 mph (48 kts)
Power On Stall Speed – 51 mph (44 kts)
Do Not Exceed Speed – 186 mph (163 kts)
Normal Cruise Speed – 95 mph (83 kts)
Fuel consumption – 12-13 gal./hour
Endurance – 3.4 hours (approx.) (most pilots plan 2½ hours)
Maximum Range – 300 sm (260 nm) (no reserve) (most pilots plan 200 sm)
Service Ceiling – 13,300 ft.
Initial Rate of Climb – 800 ft./min.
Take-Off Distance – 600 ft.
Landing Distance – 300-500 ft.

Permissible Aerobatics

Spins
Inside loops
Snap rolls under 106 mph (92 kts)
Slow rolls under 124 mph (108kts)
Immelmann turns
Inverted flight
Inverted spins

Airworthiness Directives

The Boeing/Stearman Model 75 has had five airworthiness Directives issued for it. Only two of these apply to the stock airplane while the other three apply to agricultural duster/sprayer airplanes.

Due to inadequate drainage forward of the ailerons, water drain holes must be drilled in the dural angle forming the lower rear edge of the wing at the aileron gap.

Upon initial certification as a civilian aircraft and at each subsequent annual inspection the fuel tank in the center section must be removed and the spars inspected for moisture damage. The drain holes must be ascertained to be open.

Repeated removal of the fuel tank is not required if after the initial inspection of the center section the gap between the fuel tank and the upper surface of the center section is sealed by doping on fabric to prevent moisture from entering the fuel tank compartment.

McCauley steel blade propeller Models 41D5926 and D-1093. Each 100 hours of operation a magnetic (magnaflux) inspection of hub and blade shanks for cracks must be completed.

Aircraft tachometer must be placarded “Avoid continuous operation at 1500 to 1650 rpm.”

Hamilton Standard Model 5404. Blades Model 11C1 (Navy 4350, 4350F, 4350F1)

To minimize the possibility of propeller blade shank fatigue failures as a result of noncompliance with a mandatory engine operation restriction, the following precautionary measures should be taken:

1. Check the marking on the engine tachometer and correctly mark it, if necessary, with a red arc which covers the entire rpm range above 1900 rpm.

2. Install placard in aircraft to read:
“Avoid all engine operations above 1900 rpm except during takeoff.”

3. Check position of the propeller and correctly index, if necessary, in the zero degree position (blades in line with crank throw).

Stearman Type Club

Stearman Restorers Association
7000 Merrill Ave., Suite 90
Chino, CA 91710-8800
E-mail: [email protected]
SRA web site: www.stearman.net

National Stearman Fly-In

National Stearman Fly-In
c/o National Stearman Foundation, Inc.
370 Lloyd Stearman Drive
P.O. Box 1937
Galesburg, IL 61402
E-mail: [email protected]
Web site: www.stearmanflyin.com

National Stearman Fly-In held annually the first week of September beginning on Labor Day.


The Stearman Model 75, commonly known as simply "a Stearman", is the basic military trainer biplane introduced in the 1930's and manufactured by Boeing. It served as the basic trainer for the USAAC and the USN during World War II. The Army referred to it as a "PT", The Navy as an "N2S", and the Canadians as a "Kaydet". More than 10,000 were built by the end of 1945.

Read more information on the N2S-3 Stearman from the free online resource 'Wikipedia'.

N2S-3 - Constr #: A75N1 75-4924 - BuNo: 55687 (U.S. Navy)

The known history of this aircraft is listed below.

DateSquadronLocation
1943 Jun 30ManufacturedWichita, KS
Built as N2S-4 (Constr Model A75N1)
1943 Jul 5Acceptance
. .
1944 AugPoolNAS Minneapolis, MN
1944 SepPoolNAS St. Louis, MO
1944 Sep 30Stricken from InventoryNAS St. Louis, MO
1945 Feb 28Reinstated
1945 MarNAPTNAS Dallas, TX
1945 JunPoolNAS Dallas, TX
1945 Aug 8PoolNAS Clinton, OK
1945 Oct 31Stricken from InventoryNAS Clinton, OK
. .
1947 Converted to Crop Duster - Georgia
Acquired out of military surplus
1952 Crop Duster - Alabama
1964 Crop Duster - Mississippi
1972 Civilian Ownership - Tennessee
Converted from Crop Duster back to
Civilian 2 cockpit configuration
1994 Civilian Ownership - Wisconsin
"Ground Up" restoration completed
Restored to N2S-3 configuration
(Constr Model B75N1 equivalent)
1995 Won SRA "Best N2S" Award at Galesburg
2000 Nov Civilian Ownership - Illinois
2003 Dec Warbird Heritage Foundation

SPECIFICATIONS

Manufacturer:Boeing Airplane Company
Model:N2S-3 (from 1994 restoration
Originally built as N2S-4)
Year Built:1943
Constr # / Plant:A75N1 75-4924/Wichita Division
Wichita, KS
BuNo:55687 (U.S. Navy)
N-Number:N52107
Engines:One
Continental Motors W 670-6N radial piston
220 HP
Length:24 ft. 3 in.
Height:9 ft. 2 in.
Wingspan:32 ft. 2 in.
Weight:Empty: 1,936 lbs.
Max Takeoff: 2,717 lbs.
Performance:Range: 505 miles
Ceiling: 11,200 ft.
Max Speed: 100-124 MPH

GALLERY

Explore the photos of our aircraft on this page by clicking the play arrow, or click on the square in the upper right hand corner to go to full screen. Once on the page, click play. To return to this page, click upper right hand button again. In full screen mode, you can double click the image to get a close-up view.


Boeing-Stearman N2S-5 Kaydet

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Boeing-Stearman N2S-5 Kaydet

CCO - Creative Commons (CC0 1.0)

This media is in the public domain (free of copyright restrictions). You can copy, modify, and distribute this work without contacting the Smithsonian. For more information, visit the Smithsonian's Terms of Use page.

IIIF provides researchers rich metadata and image viewing options for comparison of works across cultural heritage collections. More - https://iiif.si.edu

Boeing-Stearman N2S-5 Kaydet

CCO - Creative Commons (CC0 1.0)

This media is in the public domain (free of copyright restrictions). You can copy, modify, and distribute this work without contacting the Smithsonian. For more information, visit the Smithsonian's Terms of Use page.

IIIF provides researchers rich metadata and image viewing options for comparison of works across cultural heritage collections. More - https://iiif.si.edu

Boeing-Stearman N2S-5 Kaydet

CCO - Creative Commons (CC0 1.0)

This media is in the public domain (free of copyright restrictions). You can copy, modify, and distribute this work without contacting the Smithsonian. For more information, visit the Smithsonian's Terms of Use page.

IIIF provides researchers rich metadata and image viewing options for comparison of works across cultural heritage collections. More - https://iiif.si.edu

Boeing-Stearman N2S-5 Kaydet

Over 10,000 Stearman trainers were built by Boeing's Wichita Division, which had purchased the Stearman Company in the late 1930s. These Kaydets, along with Fairchilds and Ryans, served as the backbone of U.S. Army and Navy primary training in World War II. The original U.S. Army Kaydet was the PT-13 with a 220 Lycoming R-680 engine. The only complete standardization of an Army and Navy production design aircraft during World War II was achieved with the Boeing-Stearman E-75, which served the Army as the PT-13D and the Navy as the N2S-5.

CCO - Creative Commons (CC0 1.0)

This media is in the public domain (free of copyright restrictions). You can copy, modify, and distribute this work without contacting the Smithsonian. For more information, visit the Smithsonian's Terms of Use page.

IIIF provides researchers rich metadata and image viewing options for comparison of works across cultural heritage collections. More - https://iiif.si.edu

Boeing-Stearman N2S-5 Kaydet

Boeing-Stearman N2S-5 Kaydet

Display Status:

This object is on display in the World War II Aviation (UHC) at the Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center in Chantilly, VA.

Over 10,000 Stearman trainers were built by Boeing's Wichita Division, which had purchased the Stearman Company in the late 1930s. These Kaydets, along with Fairchilds and Ryans, served as the backbone of U.S. Army and Navy primary training in World War II. The original U.S. Army Kaydet was the PT-13 with a 220 Lycoming R-680 engine. The only complete standardization of an Army and Navy production design aircraft during World War II was achieved with the Boeing-Stearman E-75, which served the Army as the PT-13D and the Navy as the N2S-5.

This Kaydet was accepted by the Navy on December 7, 1943, exactly two years after the attack on Pearl Harbor. The airplane was flown to the Ottumwa, Iowa, Naval Air Station, where it was used to train naval aviation cadets until 1946.

Over 10,000 Stearman trainers were built by Boeing's Wichita Division, which had purchased the Stearman Company in the late 1930s. These Kaydets, along with Fairchilds and Ryans, served as the backbone of U.S. Army and Navy primary training in World War II. The original U.S. Army Kaydet was the PT-13 with a 220 Lycoming R-680 engine. The only complete standardization of an Army and Navy production design aircraft during World War II was achieved with the Boeing-Stearman E-75, which served the Army as the PT-13D and the Navy as the N2S-5.

This Kaydet was accepted by the Navy on December 7, 1943, exactly two years after the attack on Pearl Harbor. The airplane was flown to the Ottumwa, Iowa, Naval Air Station, where it was used to train naval aviation cadets until 1946.


Model Background

The Boeing Stearman was built to be a primary training aircraft for pilots in the Army Air Force and Navy. There were many different variants of the Stearman. Most of the variations were the results of using different engines.

History of the Wings of the North Stearman

The Wings of the North Stearman is an N2S-1 Stearman. It was stationed at the Minneapolis Naval Air Station and is one of several that was flown by former President George H. W. Bush during his flight training. The aircraft restoration was completed by Aircorps Aviation in Bemidji, MN and had its first post restoration flight on July 11, 2015.


Boeing N2S-3 Stearman (Trainer)

This Boeing N2S-3 Stearman Kaydet is a two-seater bi-plane was able to quickly separate the men from the boys during flight training for the U.S. Navy (and the U.S. Army Air Corps as the PT-13/-17) during the 1930s and 1940s. Many Kaydets are still flying today.

Our Stearman is known as the “Bush Stearman.” President George H.W. Bush soloed in this aircraft on December 15, 1942, while participating in flight training at Naval Air Station, Minneapolis, MN.

His flight logbook reflects tail numbers and flight hours of each plane flown during flight training.

George H.W. Bush was commissioned ensign June 1943, making him the youngest naval aviator at the time (18 years old). His TBM was hit near Chichi Jima requiring him to bail out. H.W. Bush flew 58 missions, was awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross, three Air Medals, and the Presidential Unit Citation aboard USS Jacinto.

The Bush Stearman

This N2S-3 Stearman Kaydet was flown by President George H.W. Bush on December 15, 1942, during his flight training at Naval Air Station, Minneapolis, MN. In June 1943, he was commissioned as an Officer and Pilot in the Navy at that time.

Built by the Stearman Aircraft Division of the Boeing Company in Wichita, Kansas, a simple and sturdy design made the N2S-3 Kaydet an ideal trainer for beginner pilots in the U.S. Army and Navy. The bi-plane was constructed with canvas stretched over a steel-framed body and wood-framed wings. Boeing built 8,584 Kaydets, in all, with an additional 2,000 similar aircraft as spares. The Kaydet was used in countries across North America, Asia, and South America in both military and civilian roles.

During its restoration process, this aircraft was confirmed to have been flown by President George H.W. Bush during his training at Naval Air Station, Minneapolis. To validate the identity of a WWII Navy Stearman, you must match the Navy serial number, manufacturer’s serial number, and the FAA N-number. With FAA Aircraft Registry Office in Oklahoma City, the NBA database, and the National Air and Space Museum, the hunt uncovered five biplanes flown by President Bush during training at NAS Minneapolis.

Pearl Harbor Aviation Museum’s permanent aircraft collection contains two aircraft related to the wartime service of President Bush. The TBM Avenger, currently in our Restoration Shop will be painted with the markings of the Avenger flown by President Bush as a pilot with VT-51 on USS Jacinta. While piloting his aircraft over the island of Chichi Jima 150 miles north of Iwo Jima, the aircraft took anti-aircraft fire and burst into flames. Bush ordered his crew to bail and waited in a raft until rescued by the submarine USS Finback after hours on the water.

The Bush Stearman has been generously donated by Mary Meyland in honor of her father, Bob Meyland.


What’s in the Box?

The kit comes well packaged in ICM’s ‘bomb proof’ boxing which is a box within a box (Revell could learn from this !!) with some lovely box art showing a Yellow US Navy training aircraft on the front. This is the third boxing of this kit
1. 32050 – Stearman PT-17/N2S-3 Kaydet American Training Aircraft
2. 32051 – Stearman PT-17 with American Cadets
3. 32052 – Stearman PT-13/N2S-2/5 Kaydet, American Training Aircraft

The top box is removed to reveal a second enclosed box which, when opened, reveals a single bag with all the plastic parts, an instruction sheet and a decal sheet. Inside the bag are 4 grey plastic sprues and a single small clear sprue. All are very well moulded with no obvious flash or short shots. Surface detail is excellent, ejection pin marks are all on non-visible surfaces and the sprue attachments are minimal. Care will still need to be taken when removing some of the more delicate parts such as the cockpit framing as damaging is easy, so I recommend a good quality pair of snippers for this job.

The instruction sheet is well printed and on first impressions it appears to show a logical and clear build sequence. There are 3 decal options at the back of the instructions with colour call outs but more on these later on in the build. One nice touch is a masking template for the windscreens onto which masking tape can be placed and cut out.

The decals are well printed and in register and the carrier film is both thin and minimal. These cover the markings for the three options, stencilling and instrument dials. The only thing that is missing from the kit are seatbelts so these will have to be sourced from aftermarket manufacturers or the spares box.

Aftermarket Extras:
• Eduard 33265 Interior Stearman PT-17/N2S-3 1/32 (designed to be used with ICM kits)
• Eduard 33266 Stearman PT-17/N2S-3 seatbelts STEEL 1/32 (designed to be used with ICM kits).

Construction and Video Demos…


Boeing-Stearman N2S - History

Photograph:

Boeing E-75 Stearman VH-JQY (c/n 75-5793) at Narrandera, NSW in April 2006 (David C Eyre)

Country of origin:

Description:

Two-seat military training biplane

Power Plant:

One 168 kw (225 hp) Lycoming R-680-17 direct drive nine-cylinder air-cooled radial engine

Specifications:

History:

In 1934 the Stearman Aircraft Company became a subsidiary of Boeing, and in that year placed in production its Model 73, a derivative of the Stearman Model C series of biplanes. A total of 8,584 examples was built for a variety of military services, along with spares equivalent to a further 1,762 aircraft.

Lloyd Stearman in the 1920s was an engineer with Laird Airplane Company and worked with Walter Beech and Clyde Cessna. At about that time they were involved in the formation of the Travel Air Manufacturing Companhy, Stearman being the chief engineer. In 1927 Stearman, with racing pilot Frederick Hoyt, launched a new company known as the Stearman Aircraft Inc in California, later moving to Wichita in Kansas where production of aircraft commenced.

A number of designs were produced, many with radial engines, and they became known to be rugged and reliable. In 1929 the United Aircraft & Transport Company acquired the Stearman Company, United being involved with United Airlines, Pratt & Whitney engines, Hamilton Standard propellers, Boeing, Sikorsky and Vought. Lloyd Stearman left after some little time and acquired Lockheed, and later again moved on to Stearman-Hammond Aircraft Corporation.

In 1933 an engineering team at the Stearman Division of United produced the Model 70, known as the XPT943, this being a re-design of an aircraft which had become known as the Cloudboy and which was flown to the Army Air Corps technical base at Wright Field, Dayton, Ohio.

Developed to meet the requirements of the US military for a training aircraft, initial orders were 41 aircraft for the US Navy and 26 for the US Army. On 1 April 1938 Boeing obtained the Stearman company and thereafter all aircraft became known as the Boeing Stearman, initial production aircraft being the PT-17 with 164 kw (220 hp) Continental radial engines, some 3,769 examples of this model alone being produced. As production got under way examples were supplied to training centres, many thousands of US and RAF pilots were trained under the Arnold Scheme.

The standard primary trainer of the US military services during World War II, the ‘Stearman’ as it was known, or ‘Kaydet’, was supplied with a variety of engines, including the 168 kw (225 hp) Wright R-790-8 Whirlwind, the R-760 Whirlwind, the 313 kw (420 hp) R-975-E3 Whirlwind, the Lycoming R-680, the 239 kw (320 hp) Pratt & Whitney R-985-T1B Wasp Junior, and others.

The type was also supplied at that time to the Navy of Argentina, the Brazilian Air Force, and the Venezuelan Air Corps, and in later times served with many air forces around the world, including Great Britain, China, Bolivia, Colombia, Paraguay, Cuba, Canada, Guatemala, Peru, The Philippines, and the Dominican Republic.

Army designations were mainly the PT-13D, PT-17 and PT-18 and Navy N2S-1 through to the N2S-5. In order to standardise on the designations of the series, the initial PT-17 and N2S-3 became the PR-13D and N2S-5 respectively, the first with the new designation being delivered on 27 November 1943 with both Army and Navy serial and model numbers. Peak production reached 275 aircraft a month. Production concluded on 14 February 1945.

The military history of the type is too long to relate here. Suffice to say many thousands of wartime pilots commenced their instruction on a model in this series. However, following its retirement from US military service, many thousands of Stearmans were sold to civil operators, and many of these were converted to work as single-seat crop-dusters and sprayers with a variety of engines. Modifications for this role included the installation of war-surplus 336 kw (450 hp) Pratt & Whitney Wasp Junior engines. Occasionally the fuselage or the horizontal tail surfaces were covered with sheet metal. More than 4,000 examples have appeared on the American civil register. However, the high attrition rate in agricultural work reduced this figure and in that role it gave way to new designs specifically built for the purpose.

By the 1970s many survivors of the type were being purchased by vintage aircraft enthusiasts and restored to their original war-time colour schemes and specifications – although a few kept their 336 kw (450 hp) engines. It has been in this role that the type has been seen in this region with 30 examples known to be in Australia, and initially there were five in New Zealand, the latter including ZK-STM (c/n 75-2724), ZK-RRR (c/n 75-647), ZK-TGA (c/n 75-3132), ZK-JID (c/n 75-5064) and ZK-XAF (c/n 75-5907). Further examples were imported to New Zealand in 2011, becoming ZK-USA (c/n 75-8025A – ex N65041), ZK-USN (c/n 73-3655 – ex N115JP) and ZK-NJV, which in early 2018 became ZK-BGY.

The first of the type placed on the Civil Aircraft Register in Australia was VH-AGR, a Model PT-13D, which was manufactured in 1943 as a Model B75N-1.

In 1968 the Stearman Model 75 was used as the basis of an agricultural aircraft engineered by Air New Zealand on behalf of Murrayair of Hawaii, and it became known as the MA-1, but production did not proceed.

However, VH-AGR was not the first of the type in Australia. Two previous examples of the Stearman, crop-dusting conversions known as the National NA-75, were imported to Australia in the late 1950s. The registrations VH-FBA and VH-FBB were allotted but were not taken up and, after being assembled, having the registrations applied, and remaining at Bankstown, NSW for a short period, they were returned to the USA.

One Stearman named ‘Spartacus’ flown solo by American, Robert Ragozzino, in 2000 successfully completed an around the world flight. This aircraft, fitted with additional fuel tanks to increase capacity to 1,287 litres (283 Imp gals), and fitted with a 336 kw (450 hp) engine, left from Wiley Post airport at Oklahoma City and returned 5½ months (170 days) later after covering 37,014 km (23,000 miles).

A further Stearman arrived in Sydney, NSW on 9 January 2016 flown by American aviatrix Tracey Curtis-Taylor. The aircraft left London on 1 October 2015, covering 21,000 km (13,000 miles) and visiting 23 countries, the aviatrix modelling her trip after Amy Johnson’s flight from Britain to Australia in 1930, the Stearman aircraft carrying the name ‘Spirit of Artemis’.


Boeing Stearman N2S-3 Kaydet

Boeing Stearman N2S-3 N75TQ, This stunning 1941 example of Boeing’s legendary WW2 trainer had a full nut and bolt restoration lovingly carried out by the renowned Stearman experts at Priory Farm in Norfolk U.K. Always hangared and maintained by Black Barn Aviation, this aircraft is truly one of the best examples we have seen.

N75TQ saw service between 1941-1946 at Corpus Cristi in Texas ending her service with 2400 airframe hours, sold for $250 the aircraft then spent most of its time in the U.S until arriving in England during 1989.

This aircraft has flown just 5 hours since complete restoration and offers its new owner low airframe, engine, and prop hours. The annual was carried out in October 2020, other benefits include newly fitted Redline Disc brakes, also with a MTOW of 1338Kg this aircraft can be flown with a LAPL.

Price: £115,000 (plus TAX if applicable) Enquire


Watch the video: Boeing Stearman N2SPT-17 Cockpit Tour - Mid-Atlantic Air Museum (June 2022).


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