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Passions of Pele: The Hawaiian Goddess of Fire

Passions of Pele: The Hawaiian Goddess of Fire


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Kilauea, one of earth’s most active volcanoes located on the island of Hawaii, is believed to be inhabited by a family of gods. Her name is Pele, the goddess of fire, lightning, wind and volcanoes as well as the creator of the Hawaiian Islands. She lives in the fire pit called Halemaumau crater , at the summit caldera of Kilauea. Although Pele governs Kilauea and is responsible for controlling its lava flows, her domain encompasses all volcanic activity on the Big Island of Hawaii. As a sign of respect, she is often referred to as ‘Madame Pele’ or ‘Tutu Pele’ and her epithets include Pele honua mea (Pele of the sacred land) and Ka wahine ʻai honua (The earth-eating woman).

Pele by David Howard Hitchcock, circa 1929. ( Public Domain )

Mai Kahiki ka wahine, o Pele,
Mai ka aina i Pola-pola,
Mai ka punohu ula a Kane,
Mai ke ao lalapa i ka lani,
5 Mai ka opua lapa i Kahiki.

(From Kahiki came the woman, Pele,
From the land of Pola-pola,
From the red cloud of Kane,
Cloud blazing in the heavens,
5 Fiery cloud-pile in Kahiki.)

“Unwritten Literature of Hawaii”, by Nathaniel B. Emerson (1909)

In addition to being known as the goddess of fire and being strongly associated with volcanoes, she is also a significant figure in the history of hula as one of her sisters Hiʻiaka (the patron goddess of hula dancers, sorcery and medicine) is believed to be the first person to have danced the hula. As a result of Pele's significance in hula, there have been many hula dances and chants that are also dedicated to her. The hula dedicated to Pele is often done in a way that represents her intense personality and the movement of volcanoes.

Pele’s Perilous Journey to Her Home

In one version of Pele’s legend, she is the daughter of Kane-hoa-lani, the ruler of heavens, and Haumea, the goddess of fertility and childbirth, in the mystical land of Kuaihelani. She stayed close to her mother's fireplace with the fire-keeper Lono-makua. However, Namaka / Na-maka-o-Kahai, (or ‘the eyes of Kahai’), the goddess of water and the sea as well as Pele’s older sister, feared that Pele's ambition would smother their homeland and she drove Pele away.


Contents

There are several traditional legends associated with Pele in Hawaiian mythology. In addition to being recognized as the goddess of volcanoes, Pele is also known for her power, passion, jealousy, and capriciousness. She has numerous siblings, including Kāne Milohai, Kamohoali ʻ i, Nāmaka and numerous sisters named Hi ʻ iaka, the most famous being Hi ʻ iakaikapoliopele (Hi ʻ iaka in the bosom of Pele). They are usually considered to be the offspring of Haumea. Pele's siblings include deities of various types of wind, rain, fire, ocean wave forms, and cloud forms. Her home is believed to be the fire pit called Halema ʻ uma ʻ u crater, at the summit caldera of Kīlauea, one of the Earth's most active volcanoes but her domain encompasses all volcanic activity on the Big Island of Hawai ʻ i. ΐ]

Pele shares features similar to other malignant deities inhabitants of volcanoes, as in the case of the devil Guayota of Guanche Mythology in Canary Islands (Spain), living on the volcano Teide and was considered by the aboriginal Guanches as responsible for the eruptions of the volcano. Α]

Expulsion version

In one version of the story, Pele is daughter of Kanehoalani and Haumea in the mystical land of Kuaihelani, a floating free land like Fata Morgana [disambiguation needed] . Kuaihelani was in the region of Kahiki (Kukulu o Kahiki). She stays so close to her mother's fireplace with the fire-keeper Lono-makua. Her older sister Nā-maka-o-Kaha ʻ i, a sea goddess, fears that Pele's ambition would smother the home-land and drives Pele away. Kamohoali'i drives Pele south in a canoe called Honua-i-a-kea with her younger sister Hi ʻ iaka and with her brothers Kamohoali ʻ i, Kanemilohai, Kaneapua, and arrives at the islets above Hawaii. There Kane-milo-hai is left on Mokupapapa, just a reef, to build it up in fitness for human residence. On Nihoa, 800 feet above the ocean she leaves Kane-apua after her visit to Lehua and crowning a wreath of kau-no'a. Pele feels sorry for her younger brother and picks him up again. Pele used the divining rod, Pa‘oa to pick a new home. A group of chants tells of a pursuit by Namakaokaha'i and Pele is torn apart. Her bones, KaiwioPele form a hill on Kahikinui, while her spirit escaped to the island of Hawai ʻ i. Β] :157 (Pele & Hi'iaka A myth from Hawaii by Nathaniel B. Emerson)

Flood version

In another version, Pele comes from a land said to be "close to the clouds," with parents Kane-hoa-lani and Ka-hina-li ʻ i, and brothers Ka-moho-ali ʻ i and Kahuila-o-ka-lani. From her husband Wahieloa (also called Wahialoa) she has a daughter Laka and a son Menehune. Pele-kumu-honua entices her husband and Pele travels in search of him. The sea pours from her head over the land of Kanaloa (perhaps the island now known as Kaho ʻ olawe) and her brothers say:

O the sea, the great sea!
Forth bursts the sea:
Behold, it bursts on Kanaloa!

The sea floods the land, then recedes this flooding is called Kai a Kahhinalii ("The sea of Ka-hina-li ʻ i"), as Pele's connection to the sea was passed down from her mother Kahinalii. Β] :158 Γ] Δ]

Pele and Poli'ahu

Pele was considered to be a rival of the Hawaiian goddesses of snow, Poli'ahu, and her sisters Lilinoe (a goddess of fine rain), Waiau (goddess of Lake Waiau), and Kahoupokane (a kapa maker whose kapa making activities create thunder, rain, and lightning). All except Kahoupokane reside Mauna Kea. The kapa maker lives on Hualalai.

One myth tells that Poli'ahu had come from Mauna Kea with her friends to attend sled races down the grassy hills south of Hamakua. Pele came disguised as a beautiful stranger and was greeted by Poli'ahu. However, Pele became jealously enraged at the goddess of Mauna Kea. She opened the subterranean caverns of Mauna Kea and threw fire from them towards Poli'ahu, with the snow goddess fleeing towards the summit. Poli'ahu was finally able to grab her now-burning snow mantle and throw it over the mountain. Earthquakes shook the island as the snow mantle unfolded until it reached the fire fountains, chilling and hardening the lava. The rivers of lava were driven back to Mauna Loa and Kīlauea. Later battles also led to the defeat of Pele and confirmed the supremacy of the snow goddesses in the northern portion of the island and of Pele in the southern portion. Ε]

Historical times

Pele belief continued after the old religion was officially abolished in 1819. In the summer of 1823 English missionary William Ellis toured the island to determine locations for mission stations. Ζ] :236 After a long journey to the volcano Kīlauea with little food, Ellis eagerly ate the wild berries he found growing there. Ζ] :128 The berries of the ʻ ōhelo (Vaccinium reticulatum) plant were considered sacred to Pele. Traditionally prayers and offerings to Pele were always made before eating the berries. The volcano crater was an active lava lake, which the natives feared was a sign that Pele was not pleased with the violation. Ζ] :143 Although wood carvings and thatched temples were easily destroyed, the volcano was a natural monument to the goddess.

In December 1824 the High Chiefess Kapi ʻ olani descended into the Halema ʻ uma ʻ u crater after reciting a Christian prayer instead of the traditional one to Pele. She was not killed as predicted, and this story was often told by missionaries to show the superiority of their faith. Η] Alfred, Lord Tennyson (1809–1892) wrote a poem about the incident in 1892. ⎖]

When businessman George Lycurgus ran a hotel at the rim of Kīlauea, called the Volcano House, he would often "pray" to Pele for the sake of the tourists. Park officials took a dim view of his habit of tossing items such as gin bottles (after drinking their contents) into the crater. ⎗]

Plantation owner William Hyde Rice published a version of the story in his collection of legends. ⎘] In 2003 the Volcano Art Center had a special competition for Pele paintings to replace one done in the early 20th century by D. Howard Hitchcock displayed in the Hawaii Volcanoes National Park visitors center. Some criticized what looked like a blond caucasian as the Hawaiian goddess. ⎙] Over 140 paintings were submitted, and finalists were displayed at sites within the park. ⎚] The winner of the contest was Pahoa, Hawaii artist Arthur Johnsen. This version shows the goddess in shades of red, with a digging stick in her left hand (the ʻ ō ʻ ō, for which the currently erupting vent was named), and an embryonic form of Hi ʻ iaka-i-ka-poli-o-Pele in her right hand. The painting is now on display at the Kīlauea Visitor Center on the edge of the Kīlauea crater. ⎛]


Goddess Pele

Message from Pele: “If you listen to the sound of your heart and breath, you will recognize the ancient rhythms of your own internal drumming. This forever connects you to the Mother of all creation, and to the sound of the planet Earth. These rhythms can’t be faked or forged they are natural and eternal. What part of you are you trying to ignore? What part of you has been overly concerned with pleasing other s, to the detriment of hearing the sounds of your own rhythm? Dear child, reach out and extend your arms to embrace your dreams. They are just as much a part of nature as are the trees, animals, and sunsets. Do not your own dreams deserve the same respect that you accord everyone and everything that you love? Listen to them, my child. Listen to your dreams. They will activate the powerful eruption of passion in your life. Do not be afraid of your own passion, for it will propel you naturally and will excite and invigorate you. When you dance to the rhythms of your life, you are truly alive in all ways.”

Various meanings of this card: Make sure your career matches your true interests. Take a class or start a hobby that really excites you. Change jobs. Go on a wonderful trip. Invest time and money in manifesting your dreams. Give yourself permission to go for it. Start a new business. Make an honest assessment of how you spend your time. List your priorities.

About Pele (pronounced Pay-lay): The Hawaiian goddess of volcanos, Pele’s dynamic strength is sometimes misunderstood. She shows us that fire can purify, release us from the old to make way for the new, and ignite our passions. Without fire, nothing would change. Call upon Pele to help you get in touch with your true passion, and to charge up your motivation and excitement. Pele will help you feel everything on a deeper level, so be unafraid of taking action to manifest your heart’s desires.”*

The sheer power of Pele is so tangible on the Big Island of Hawaii. She is everywhere in the volcanoes in the land on the green sandy beach. She is beautiful and powerful and gives the Big Island a feel of it’s own. Her power and beauty is seen in the vast lava fields around the island, which are incredible to behold by plane or helicopter. The Big Island has it’s own ancient, calm and breathtaking vibe. It’s definitely worth a visit.

Ask Pele to help you discover or rediscover the passion in your life. It doesn’t matter if you can’t make it to Hawaii! Light a candle, preferably red and hold in your hand a gem or crystal of the fire element: Fire Stones – Amber, Carnelian, Citrine, Fire Agate, Fire Opal, Garnet, Red Calcite, Red Jasper, Rubellite (Red Tourmaline), Ruby, Sard, Sardonyx, Sunstone, Volcanic Black Salt (natural) and call Pele to you. Know that she will expect full disclosure, there is no hiding your passions from Pele. This is your chance to find your desires and dreams and pull them into reality, with the help of a very powerful goddess.

When you have a clear vision of your passion in full detail, then you can ask for her help in manifesting this passion into your life. Best done on a full moon, or if possible, at the beach.


Madam Pele, the Fire Goddess: A Diablogue

Images of Madam Pele, the Hawaiian Goddess of Fire, resemble the flames seen in flowing lava. When she erupts she is passion incarnate, bringing destruction and creation at the same time.

When not active, she rests peacefully within the earth, sharing her energy with those who live in the shadow of the volcano.

What do stories of Gods and Goddesses mean for our modern world?

[This blog post is a dialogue between Jody and Michelle about Pele]

M: Thank you, Jody, for wanting to write about Pele. The district I live in is considered part of the lands of Pele. Even if I am a modern person, in some sense I live inside the story of Pele because I’ve been hearing stories about her all my life. Also, the story of Pele explains the kind of relationship most people have with the landscape here the best. It is a very personal and reverent relationship. It’s hard not feel reverence before Halemaʻumaʻu, the vast smoking, flaming crater that is her home.

J: The powerful elements of nature fire, water, air (wind), and earth are often pictured as images of Gods and Goddesses. They capture our need to ‘humanize’ the forces of nature making it easier to talk with them, perhaps in the hope that they wouldn’t destroy us.

M: Yes, living within sight of a live volcano reminds you daily and deep in your psyche how contingent your life is on forces far beyond human control or even comprehension. The story of Pele explains something that even the scientific facts about volcanoes can’t explain very well – the feeling of living near a volcano, the feeling of living near a super-human, landscape-scale being that is extremely fierce and unpredictable.

J: The God’s and Goddesses were also believed to have been the source of many gifts. Early humans believed that the Gods gave us the gift of fire. Our ability to control fire was probably one of the earliest human tools.

Some scientists suggest that life arrived on earth from stardust, fallen meteorites that contained frozen molecules of DNA from some distant exploded solar system. ‘We’ traveled to earth across light years and the seed within the meteorite became the molecules of life that began to grow within the mud along the edges of a very different sea, under a very different sky.

We have little if any scientific proof, the evidence was long ago destroyed, but the ideas are interesting. Humans have long tried to imagine our beginning, how we got here, where we are headed.

M: There is a very beautiful story recounted by Robin Wall Kimmerer about Skywoman, the goddess who fell from the sky, that is another way of talking about this idea of life being seeded from the stars:

“She fell like a maple seed, pirouetting on an autumn breeze. A column of light streamed from a hole in the Skyworld, marking her path where only darkness had been before. It took her a long time to fall.”

Pele is also said to have been a traveller from another world she is said to have led her clan from the ancestral, mythical lands of Kahiki to find the islands of Hawaiʻi. So we are talking about a very strong, passionate woman here, who could lead her clan into the unknown, to take that ultimate gamble of seeking out new islands in the vastness of the North Pacific.

J: All through time life has faced challenges maintaining it’s tenuous foothold on the thin skin of surface we inhabit on this planet. I think of today with temperatures rising, climate changing, storms becoming stronger, and I wonder if Pele feels the stirrings too. We used to fear making the Gods and Goddesses angry lest we awaken their destructive forces. Perhaps in honoring Goddesses such as Pele we acknowledge the powerful forces of nature lest we are ever arrogant enough to think we can control them.

Here is a poem I wrote trying to express the ebb and flow of the energy we call passion.

Passion comes unveiled and I stand aright at last.
How quickly the mind surrenders to the fire from within.
The energy that creates me surges through my veins,
and lifts my body upwards towards a union with my soul.
Like a demon possessed or a Goddess on her throne,
the spirit of fire devours my every flesh and bone.
Underneath life’s movement passion runs its course,
giving everyday events a touch of rapture and remorse.
How easy it is to feel creation’s lust and thrill,
until passion burns to dust and the curtain falls once more.

M: Your poem reminds us how much the passions that surge through our minds and bodies connect us to the greater processes of the world. You seem to have been “channeling” a fire goddess when you wrote this! Your poem also makes me think of another poem about nature, creativity, and passion by Alice Fulton (quoted in Karen Barad’s Meeting the Universe Halfway: Quantum Physics and the Entanglement of Matter and Meaning (2007):

because truths we don’t suspect have a hard time
making themselves felt, as when thirteen species
of whiptail lizards composed entirely of females
stay undiscovered due to bias
against such things existing,
we have to meet the universe halfway.
Nothing will unfold for us unless we move toward what
looks to us like nothing: faith is a cascade.
The sky’s high solid is anything
but, the sun going under hasn’t
budged, and if death divests the self
it’s the sole event in nature
that’s exactly what it seems.

Because believing a thing’s true
can bring about that truth,
and you might be the shy one, lizard or electron,
known only through advances
presuming your existence, let my glance be passional
toward the universe and you.

What Alice Fulton (and Karen Barad) is getting at, I think, is that what we find is what we want to find, in other words, what is meaningful to us. So the story of Pele helps us to see things – the shy ones – that we otherwise might not find meaningful enough to see. And so we can all be voyagers, discoverers of new worlds, in our own home landscape, by seeking to see what is right there in a different way. Every landscape is the home of gods and goddesses, and itʻs not that you have to believe in them, itʻs that you might be able to see them. Like in Chrisʻ quiet and profound If You Stop in the Woods or Richardʻs eery and wonderful Keep you Eyes and Hear Open.


Pele, Goddess of Fire and Volcanoes

Painting of the goddess Pele by Herb Kane at Hawaii Volcanoes National Park Visitor Center. Photo courtesy Prayitno of via flickr.

Pele Makes Her Home at Halemaumau Crater

Halemaumau Crater, Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii Volcanoes National Park, Hawaii Island. Photo: Guy Cortemanche.

Small towns and entire forests have been wiped out by Pele’s passionate, unpredictable and volatile temper, and while her presence is felt on all of the Hawaiian islands, legend maintains that she resides in one of the most active volcanoes in the world — at the summit of Kīlauea, within Halema‘uma‘u crater at Hawaii Volcanoes National Park on the Big Island.

Pele (pronounced peh-leh) sends rivers of lava down the mountainside, adding more than 70 acres of new land to the southeastern coast since 1983.

Travel to her home, stand at the edge of the edge of the crater and many say they are moved by the spirit of this goddess.

Mysterious and Respected

Lava at sunset. Photo: Hawaii.com member Daniel B.

Don’t Take the Rocks or Eat the Berries

It’s also considered offensive to eat any of the ‘ohelo berries that grow along the edges of Halema‘uma‘u caldera without first offering them to the goddess or requesting permission.

Tahitian Exile

She fought with her elder sister Namakaokaha‘i, the water goddess, whose husband Pele had seduced. (Most of the lovers Pele took were not lucky enough to escape with their lives.)

Pele’s oldest brother, Kamohoali‘i, the king of the sharks, gave her a canoe that she and several of her siblings paddled across the sea, all the while battling with Namakaokaha‘i.

Finding a Home in Hawaii

Kilauea Iki Crater, Hawaii Volcanoes National Park, Hawaii Island. Photo: ArtBrom.

The ancient Hawaiians personified all natural forces as gods and goddesses, and thus Pele continues to make her majesty known from the mountain to the sea — the stark landscape a reminder of her power to both create and destroy.


Ebil's Grimoire

"Pele, Volcano Goddess" by Gwenhwyfar Pele, the Hawaiian volcano goddess, once thought of herself as a goddess of water. The myth tells of how Pele led her people to a Landmass while searching for her own vocation. In one myth her mother gave her the ocean as a gift, surrounding the landmass and leaving only the mountain peaks exposed. In others, she is fighting with her sister Na-maka-o-ka-ha'I until finding Hawaii. There she creates her home at Kilauea out of her sea sisters reach. Pele believed herself to also be a goddess of water and proceeded to dig holes, only to uncover gushing rivers of lava. The thrill of the lava spoke to Pele and she embraced the element of fire. Her people recognized her as a fire goddess bestowing on her the titles of goddess of the volcano and Pele the Destroyer (5).
Even with a title as fierce as "Destroyer," Pele is considered a Mother Goddess. She contains within her both the destructive and creative powers of life. These powers are still very evident in Hawaii where her home volcano of Kilauea has been erupting periodically since 1983 (4:44). The creative force in Pele's nature is shown in the synchronization of the elements during the eruption process. All four elements work together. Earth and fire mix creating lava. Lava possesses water characteristics in the liquidity of its form, while air is represented by the billowing clouds of smoke during eruption. Air and water are also present in steam when the lava reaches the ocean forming new landmass. It is in this way that the Hawaiian archipelago was formed, and Pele credited with its creation (2:109).


Pele is a very jealous goddess. She is protective of her territory and has been known to punish those who would dare to steal stones from her sacred places. Many visitors to Hawaii's volcanoes leave her offerings in the form of ohelo berries, ohia lehua blossoms, taro, or kala root. She is even left bottles of gin by some. Even with the offering Pele's permission must be asked before removing one of her stones. Many use the rocks she gifts them with as protective amulets (2:109)(3). Pele's fury can be aroused by the breaking of taboos, so many Hawaiians respect Pele's jealous nature and leave her the offerings. State park rangers tell of seeing people out late at night on the volcanoes' edges worshipping the goddess. When reaching the scene all they find are the offerings (4:46).

Volcanic eruptions are only one manifestation of the goddess Pele. Pele is a living goddess, appearing to her people as a wise old woman bumming cigarettes, or as a surpassingly beautiful young woman, or as a little white dog. She is said to light cigarettes with a flick of her fingers and to dance in red robes around the rims of the fiery mountains. (6:250). Brown haired women are sacred to Pele, hair itself is sacred to her. Thin strands of lava floating about in the air during eruptions are referred to as Pele's Hair (4:46).

"Pele, Spirit of Fire" by Gwenhwyfar

Pele's different physical manifestations have different meanings. If she is dress in white then she is warning of ill health. If she is in red, then an eruption is imminent. Urban legend has young men stopping to pick up a beautiful young woman by the side of the road, only to have her vanish once inside the vehicle.

Many Hawaiian's still love and honor Pele as Kupuna (ancestress) and trace their lineage back to her. Her priests and priestesses are called Kaula Pele (Pele's prophets). She is very much alive to her followers. Many still perform rituals for the deceased to be accepted by Pele. Pouring rain and thunder are signs that their offerings have been accepted and the spirit of the dead has been accepted (4:45). I think this description by Scott Cunningham best brings to life the goddess' presence in the modern world:

Image from Sacred Source She is a tangible, physical presence in the volcano area of the island of Hawai'i. The ground is scorched, cracked, and blackened with lava. The scent of sulfur hangs in the air and irritates the throat. Steam eerily rises from the earth. During major eruptions, lava flows scorch the earth and , at the shore line, continue her ageless fight with her sister Na-maka-o-ka-ha as molten lava pours into the sea, causing tremendous explosions and mountains of steam (4:49).

Pele's awesome power and reputation for jealousy is a source of both fear and respect for her followers however, there is a more light hearted side to Pele. She loves to surf, and is often seen surfing fiery crests of lava during eruptions. She is also said to occasionally take part in Papa Bolua, a game (contest) performed during the festival of Maki'hiki. The contest has two people racing each oter down the mountain on oiled sleds. Whoever could travel the farthest wins. Pele, whenever she participates, always wins (5).
Pele's worshippers know how to soothe Pele's quick temper through their songs, chants and prayers. Invoking Pele through music can be calming to both the petitioner and Pele. The people of Hawaii still "melo o Pele" (sing and chant to Pele and Kilauea). An example of one of the chants used for Pele is:

"E ola mau, e Pele e! 'Eli'eli kau mai! Ee-o-la-mao e
Pay lay ee! E-lee-e-lee-ka-my,"
This translates as "long life to you, Pele" (7:167).

Pele is a very powerful deity to work with. She lends her strength and passions to her followers. She is to be invoked when seeking protection, energy, strength, creativity or the ability to let go. Use the following Incense by Scott Cunningham while honoring Pele, or if wanting to add strength to any ritual, or just while performing any fire ritual.

I find myself many days waking up with the Goddess Pele. On mornings when I feel unenergized and need extra strength and vigor, I perform this ritual to Pele. First I make a cup of "Pele's coffee." This is really simple to make and can be altered to fit time constraints. The ingredients needed are brewed coffee (preferably a Kona blend), unsweetened baker's chocolate (or if in a hurry some sort of chocolate milk mix such as Hershey's syrup or Nestle quick), and cayenne pepper powder.
"Pele Profile" by Gwenhwyfar

First make your cup of coffee in a strength you normally drink. Next melt 1 block of baker's chocolate until liquid and set aside. Add a pinch, or dash of cayenne to the chocolate and mix well. Now add the spicy chocolate mixture to your coffee. If you normally add sugar to your coffee you may do so now, however, too much sugar will counter the cayenne pepper effect. If using an alternative to the unsweetened baker's chocolate then there will be sugar present already from the mix you chose and you will most likely not need to add a sweetener. If using a mix instead of baker's chocolate, add either two squirts of Hershey's syrup or two teaspoons of Quick mix directly to the brewed coffee, then add your cayenne pepper to the mug. Stir well.
Once stirred, I lean over my mug and breath in the strong spicy aroma. Then I invoke the goddess' strength to aid me for that day by chanting, "Fiery Pele, spirit of Fire, ignite my mind and guide me with your strength."

Pele's Fire
Sunlight, tripping
along the waves playfully laughs
at the deep depths below.
Rushing headlong to shore and
Skimming atop the black sand
Into Pele's outstretched hand.
Her magic leaves behind a fierce heat
That seeps through my bare feet
And warms the hollows of my bones.
Her heat simmers inside, insistent.
"follow me" it playfully demands.
I follow, the heat soars into
A blazing crescendo of fiery passion.
She shows herself to me.
"Fire is my element! Do not fear the flames."
She triumphantly stands
amidst the volcano's heart.
By Gwenhwyfar

1. Cunningham, Scott. The Complete Book of Incense, Oils, & Brews. St.Paul: Llewellyn. 1989
2. ---. Cunningham's Encyclopedia of Crystal, Gem & Metal Magic. St.Paul: Llewellyn. 1988.
3. ---. Cunningham's Encyclopedia of Magical Herbs. St.Paul: Llewellyn. 1985.
4. ---. Hawaiian Magic and Spirituality. St. Paul: Llewellyn. 1994.
5. Myth and Mankind: Journey's through Dreamtime, Oceanian Myth. ed. Duncan Baird Publishers Castle House. Amsterdam: Time Life Books. 1999. (possibly out of print, I have seen bargain books in this series at my local Barnes&Noble)
6. Monaghan, Patricia. The New Book of Goddesses & Heroines . St.Paul: Llewellyn. 1981.
7. Brockway, Laurie Sue. A Goddess Is A Girl's Best Friend. New York: Perigee. 2002.


Goddess Pele. The Ancient Pantheon of Goddess Culture..A return to the Hawaiian Goddess Kahuna Teachings of Uli, Pele, Hina, Haumea, Lake, Hi'iaka consciousness..Goddess Ancient Creatrix known inhuna Lemuria, Mu and Hawaii. Hawaiian Goddesses, Mu, , kahuna,priestesses, moon, ritual, rites, ceremony, ancient, Hawaiian, lunar, teachings, Lemurian,full moon, magnetic force, 13, Divine Goddess,thealogy creatrix,,ancient mother, goddesses, divine, sacred, feminine, creatrix, feminist, women's wisdom, spirituality, all mother, herstory, Pele, Hina, Haumea, Laka, Hi'iaka
GODDESS HI'IAKA | GODDESS HINA | GODDESS LAKA | GODDESS PAPA | GODDESS HAUMEA

The Hawaiian Kahuna rituals of Goddess Pele..Ancient Wisdom of the Divine Feminine..Goddess spirituality

The Hawaiian Kahuna rituals of Goddess Pele..Ancient Wisdom of the Divine Feminine..Goddess spirituality
The continuing ritual recognition of Pele proves that the Divine Feminine has not yet become totally Extinct
We summon Her to clear and purify all that is not needed. She challenges and assists us into bringing forth that which lies dormant in the very core of our Being. This awakens us to use our Gifts creatively and fully for all to Experience. The skin of any person She possesses will redden
A Passionate Goddess. Pele guides Her devotees to Greater Wisdom. She is the Keeper of Emotions and is always willing to share Her "knowing" and lessons of Transmutation
Like any other Womon . Pele has a Family..amoung her Sisters are:
Hi'iaka and Na-maka-o-ka-ha'i
Hi'iaka-I-ka-pua-'ena-'ena is a younger Sister who made Pele's AWA and Created the Lei.
Of all Her Sisters, there was but one favorite who held the Heart of Pele

Volcano Goddess Pele was born as a Flame
In the mouth of Her Earth Mother

Haumea
Grand Daughter of the Great Sky Goddess Papa
Great Grand Daughter of Mother Goddess Creatrix..ULI
Having searched a long time for a Home
Pele finally settled at Halemaumau . On the Island of Hawai'i
The Big island represents the Root Chakra
Of the Hawaiian Island Chain
Pele has been honored as the Spirit of Fire
She is the male principle contained in the Feminine
Before the male form was Man-ifested

She is very much..an Earth Goddess
Creating new land with every outpouring of Lava
One must only stand on the edge of her Crater-Womb
To witness and experience Primal Source in Action
Unlike other Goddesses who are known throughout Polynesia
Pele seems to be a deity specific to Hawaii
To this day..She can be seen playing amongst the Island people
She often appears as a Human
Forming herself into a young priestess of unsurpassed Beauty
Or an old Wise-Woman hitch-hiking on a deserted Road
She has been know to shapeshift into a Dog
Or send one to serve as an Omen
That her volcano is about to Erupt


GODDESS HI'IAKA | GODDESS HINA | GODDESS LAKA
GODDESS HAUMEA | GODDESS PAPA

Goddess Pele. The Ancient Pantheon of Goddess Culture..A return to the Hawaiian Goddess Kahuna Teachings of Uli, Pele, Hina, Haumea, Lake, Hi'iaka consciousness..Goddess Ancient Creatrix known inhuna Lemuria, Mu and Hawaii. Hawaiian Goddesses, Mu, , kahuna,priestesses, moon, ritual, rites, ceremony, ancient, Hawaiian, lunar, teachings, Lemurian,full moon, magnetic force, 13, Divine Goddess,thealogy creatrix,,ancient mother, goddesses, divine, sacred, feminine, creatrix, feminist, women's wisdom, spirituality, all mother, herstory, Pele, Hina, Haumea, Laka, Hi'iaka

The White Moon Gallery Presents

By Gwenhwyfar
© All original Material in this site is under copyright protection and is the intellectual property of the author

"Pele, Volcano Goddess" by Gwenhwyfar Pele, the Hawaiian volcano goddess, once thought of herself as a goddess of water. The myth tells of how Pele led her people to a Landmass while searching for her own vocation. In one myth her mother gave her the ocean as a gift, surrounding the landmass and leaving only the mountain peaks exposed. In others, she is fighting with her sister Na-maka-o-ka-ha'I until finding Hawaii. There she creates her home at Kilauea out of her sea sisters reach. Pele believed herself to also be a goddess of water and proceeded to dig holes, only to uncover gushing rivers of lava. The thrill of the lava spoke to Pele and she embraced the element of fire. Her people recognized her as a fire goddess bestowing on her the titles of goddess of the volcano and Pele the Destroyer (5).
Even with a title as fierce as "Destroyer," Pele is considered a Mother Goddess. She contains within her both the destructive and creative powers of life. These powers are still very evident in Hawaii where her home volcano of Kilauea has been erupting periodically since 1983 (4:44). The creative force in Pele's nature is shown in the synchronization of the elements during the eruption process. All four elements work together. Earth and fire mix creating lava. Lava possesses water characteristics in the liquidity of its form, while air is represented by the billowing clouds of smoke during eruption. Air and water are also present in steam when the lava reaches the ocean forming new landmass. It is in this way that the Hawaiian archipelago was formed, and Pele credited with its creation (2:109).


Pele is a very jealous goddess. She is protective of her territory and has been known to punish those who would dare to steal stones from her sacred places. Many visitors to Hawaii's volcanoes leave her offerings in the form of ohelo berries, ohia lehua blossoms, taro, or kala root. She is even left bottles of gin by some. Even with the offering Pele's permission must be asked before removing one of her stones. Many use the rocks she gifts them with as protective amulets (2:109)(3). Pele's fury can be aroused by the breaking of taboos, so many Hawaiians respect Pele's jealous nature and leave her the offerings. State park rangers tell of seeing people out late at night on the volcanoes' edges worshipping the goddess. When reaching the scene all they find are the offerings (4:46).

Volcanic eruptions are only one manifestation of the goddess Pele. Pele is a living goddess, appearing to her people as a wise old woman bumming cigarettes, or as a surpassingly beautiful young woman, or as a little white dog. She is said to light cigarettes with a flick of her fingers and to dance in red robes around the rims of the fiery mountains. (6:250). Brown haired women are sacred to Pele, hair itself is sacred to her. Thin strands of lava floating about in the air during eruptions are referred to as Pele's Hair (4:46).

"Pele, Spirit of Fire" by Gwenhwyfar

Pele's different physical manifestations have different meanings. If she is dress in white then she is warning of ill health. If she is in red, then an eruption is imminent. Urban legend has young men stopping to pick up a beautiful young woman by the side of the road, only to have her vanish once inside the vehicle.

Many Hawaiian's still love and honor Pele as Kupuna (ancestress) and trace their lineage back to her. Her priests and priestesses are called Kaula Pele (Pele's prophets). She is very much alive to her followers. Many still perform rituals for the deceased to be accepted by Pele. Pouring rain and thunder are signs that their offerings have been accepted and the spirit of the dead has been accepted (4:45). I think this description by Scott Cunningham best brings to life the goddess' presence in the modern world:

Image from Sacred Source She is a tangible, physical presence in the volcano area of the island of Hawai'i. The ground is scorched, cracked, and blackened with lava. The scent of sulfur hangs in the air and irritates the throat. Steam eerily rises from the earth. During major eruptions, lava flows scorch the earth and , at the shore line, continue her ageless fight with her sister Na-maka-o-ka-ha as molten lava pours into the sea, causing tremendous explosions and mountains of steam (4:49).

Pele's awesome power and reputation for jealousy is a source of both fear and respect for her followers however, there is a more light hearted side to Pele. She loves to surf, and is often seen surfing fiery crests of lava during eruptions. She is also said to occasionally take part in Papa Bolua, a game (contest) performed during the festival of Maki'hiki. The contest has two people racing each oter down the mountain on oiled sleds. Whoever could travel the farthest wins. Pele, whenever she participates, always wins (5).
Pele's worshippers know how to soothe Pele's quick temper through their songs, chants and prayers. Invoking Pele through music can be calming to both the petitioner and Pele. The people of Hawaii still "melo o Pele" (sing and chant to Pele and Kilauea). An example of one of the chants used for Pele is:

"E ola mau, e Pele e! 'Eli'eli kau mai! Ee-o-la-mao e
Pay lay ee! E-lee-e-lee-ka-my,"
This translates as "long life to you, Pele" (7:167).

Pele is a very powerful deity to work with. She lends her strength and passions to her followers. She is to be invoked when seeking protection, energy, strength, creativity or the ability to let go. Use the following Incense by Scott Cunningham while honoring Pele, or if wanting to add strength to any ritual, or just while performing any fire ritual.

I find myself many days waking up with the Goddess Pele. On mornings when I feel unenergized and need extra strength and vigor, I perform this ritual to Pele. First I make a cup of "Pele's coffee." This is really simple to make and can be altered to fit time constraints. The ingredients needed are brewed coffee (preferably a Kona blend), unsweetened baker's chocolate (or if in a hurry some sort of chocolate milk mix such as Hershey's syrup or Nestle quick), and cayenne pepper powder.
"Pele Profile" by Gwenhwyfar

First make your cup of coffee in a strength you normally drink. Next melt 1 block of baker's chocolate until liquid and set aside. Add a pinch, or dash of cayenne to the chocolate and mix well. Now add the spicy chocolate mixture to your coffee. If you normally add sugar to your coffee you may do so now, however, too much sugar will counter the cayenne pepper effect. If using an alternative to the unsweetened baker's chocolate then there will be sugar present already from the mix you chose and you will most likely not need to add a sweetener. If using a mix instead of baker's chocolate, add either two squirts of Hershey's syrup or two teaspoons of Quick mix directly to the brewed coffee, then add your cayenne pepper to the mug. Stir well.
Once stirred, I lean over my mug and breath in the strong spicy aroma. Then I invoke the goddess' strength to aid me for that day by chanting, "Fiery Pele, spirit of Fire, ignite my mind and guide me with your strength."

Pele's Fire
Sunlight, tripping
along the waves playfully laughs
at the deep depths below.
Rushing headlong to shore and
Skimming atop the black sand
Into Pele's outstretched hand.
Her magic leaves behind a fierce heat
That seeps through my bare feet
And warms the hollows of my bones.
Her heat simmers inside, insistent.
"follow me" it playfully demands.
I follow, the heat soars into
A blazing crescendo of fiery passion.
She shows herself to me.
"Fire is my element! Do not fear the flames."
She triumphantly stands
amidst the volcano's heart.
By Gwenhwyfar

1. Cunningham, Scott. The Complete Book of Incense, Oils, & Brews. St.Paul: Llewellyn. 1989
2. ---. Cunningham's Encyclopedia of Crystal, Gem & Metal Magic. St.Paul: Llewellyn. 1988.
3. ---. Cunningham's Encyclopedia of Magical Herbs. St.Paul: Llewellyn. 1985.
4. ---. Hawaiian Magic and Spirituality. St. Paul: Llewellyn. 1994.
5. Myth and Mankind: Journey's through Dreamtime, Oceanian Myth. ed. Duncan Baird Publishers Castle House. Amsterdam: Time Life Books. 1999. (possibly out of print, I have seen bargain books in this series at my local Barnes&Noble)
6. Monaghan, Patricia. The New Book of Goddesses & Heroines . St.Paul: Llewellyn. 1981.
7. Brockway, Laurie Sue. A Goddess Is A Girl's Best Friend. New York: Perigee. 2002.

Graphic Credits
Frames, Tikki Graphics, Pele Incense and Title Graphic courtesy of Gwenhwyfar
Lava photos courtesy of Time Life Magazine
"Pele, Volcano Goddess" mixed media by Gwenhwyfar
"Pele, Spirit of Fire" mixed media by Gwenhwyfar
"Pele Profile" by Gwenhwyfar
Statue of Pele courtesy of Sacred Source


Passions of Pele: The Hawaiian Goddess of Fire - History

Pele is the Hawaiian goddess of volcanoes and fire, who created the Hawaiian island chain.

In different stories talking about the goddess Pele, she was born from the female spirit named Haumea. This spirit is important when talking about Hawaii's gods as she descended from Papa, or Earth Mother, and Wakea, Sky Father, both descendants of the supreme beings. Pele is also known as "She who shapes the sacred land", known to be said in ancient Hawaiian chants.

In addition to being recognized as the goddess of volcanoes, Pele is also known for her power, passion, jealousy, and capriciousness. She has numerous siblings, including Kāne Milohai, Kamohoaliʻi, Nāmaka, and numerous sisters named Hiʻiaka, the most famous being Hiʻiakaikapoliopele (Hiʻiaka in the bosom of Pele). They are usually considered to be the offspring of Haumea. Pele's siblings include deities of various types of wind, rain, fire, ocean wave forms, and cloud forms. Her home is believed to be the fire pit called Halemaʻumaʻu at the summit caldera of Kīlauea, one of the Earth's most active volcanoes, but her domain encompasses all volcanic activity on the Big Island of Hawaiʻi.

Legend told that Pele herself journeyed on her canoe from the island of Tahiti to Hawaii. When going through with her journeys, it was said that she tried to create her fires on different islands, but her sister, Nāmaka, was chasing her wanting to put an end to her. In the end, the two sisters fought each other and Pele in the end was killed. With this happening, her body was destroyed but her spirit lives in Halemaʻumaʻu on Kilauea. They say, "Her body is the lava and steam that comes from the volcano. She can also change form, appearing as a white dog, old woman, or beautiful young woman."

In addition to her role as goddess of fire and her strong association with volcanoes, Pele is also regarded as the "goddess of the hula". She is a significant figure in the history of hula because of her sister Hiʻiaka who is believed to be the first person to dance hula. As a result of Pele's significance in hula, there have been many hula dances and chants that are dedicated to her and her family. The hula being dedicated to Pele is often performed in a way that represents her intense personality and the movement of volcanoes.


"She Who Shapes the Sacred Land": Pele, Goddess of Kilauea Volcano

In Hawaiian mythology, Ohia and Lehua were two lovers. The Volcano Goddess Pele desired Ohia. But Ohia only had eyes for Lehua. His rejection made Pele so furious that she turned him into a tree. Lehua was devastated by losing her lover. Out of pity, the gods turned her into a flower which they placed on Ohia's tree. Hawaiians believe that it rains when a Lehua flower is picked from the Ohia tree, signifying the tears of these eternal lovers.
Pele’s Ohia Lehua Tree has been sacred to the Hawaiian people since ancient times and is often mentioned in legends, hula, songs, and chants.

Volcano Goddess Pele’s fiery passion continuously gives birth to the islands. Her power is a creative force: clearing the old, laying a foundation, creating and shaping new land.

Hawaii’s great Volcano Goddess inspired the creation of Magical Hawaiian Menehune Pele .


Goddess Card of the Week – Pele – Divine Passion

On the final week of working with the Goddess Guidance Oracle by Doreen Virtue, I drew the goddess Pele – Divine Passion, as the card of the week. Pele is the Hawaiian goddess of volcanoes and fire, especially associated with Mount Kilauea, a still active volcano. She was seen as a passionate and powerful goddess who was not to be trifled with. To this day some will warn tourists to the Big Island not to take home any volcanic rocks, as to do so will invite bad luck from her.

The card Divine Passion focuses on Pele’s creative and passionate side. It asks us to look at what fuels us, what drives us, what are we so enthused over that we spill over with energy about it, much like a volcano. What would you do if you didn’t have to worry about time or money? Think about the things that make your heart sing with joy and try to put more of these into your life. Perhaps you might want to think about changing careers to something that is in line with your dreams?Maybe you need to pick up that hobby that you loved long ago but abandoned? What do you really desire to do, who do you want to be with? Your life is precious, do not waste your energy on what does not feed you. If you are presently following your heart, that’s wonderful! You might be able to inspire others to follow your lead. If you feel like you might need more of this passionate energy in your life, remember that it is too late to follow your dreams!


Watch the video: Pele the Fire Goddess. Episode 1. Legendary Polynesia. HEIHEI (July 2022).


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