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Gustav Regler

Gustav Regler


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Gustav Regler was born in Germany on 25th May, in 1898. He served in the German Army during the First World War and afterwards joined the German Communist Party. Regler fled from Nazi Germany and on the outbreak of the Spanish Civil War he joined the International Brigades.

Regler became a commissar in the army and took part in the defence of Madrid in the winter of 1936. He was seriously wounded at Huesca on 11th June 1937. He spent many months in hospital before leaving Spain.

Regler later wrote two books about the Spanish Civil War, The Great Crusade (1940) and The Owl of Minerva (1960). Gustav Regler died in 1963.


PBS Hemingway Docuseries Covers Up His Communist Connections

Another celebrity “useful idiot” -- or a conscious communist agent of influence?

“They Are Giving Hemingway Another Look, So You Can, Too…Lynn Novick and Ken Burns consider the seminal writer in all his complexity and controversy in their new PBS documentary series. Could there be anything more subversive than turning a spotlight, in this moment, on Ernest Hemingway?” wrote Gal Beckerman in The New York Times this month.

“Subversive?” Ah! At least the term appears in connection with the docuseries. And considering that Ernest Hemingway eagerly joined Stalin’s KGB (technically the NKVD at the time), secretly contributed tens of thousands to the Cuban communist party and (literally) drank, as a spectator, to Che Guevara and Fidel Castros’ firing-squad murder marathons, you might think the term “subversive” fits.

Alas! No hint of his communist sympathies and connections come across in this “frank” and “subversive” and “controversial” docuseries, which actually seems like it would be something that might have been produced by Hemingway’s mass-murdering chums in Moscow or Havana 40 years ago.

Perhaps some of you weren’t aware that declassified Soviet documents proved that Ernest Hemingway officially signed up with the KGB’s precursor the NKVD as “Agent Argo” in 1941?

OK. But don’t take it from me. After all I’m a “rabidly right-wing-Cuban exile-with-an-axe-to-grind!” Instead take it from the crypto-commie (but well-sourced) UK Guardian.

According to KGB defector Alexander Vassiliev in a book published by Yale University Press (not exactly a branch of the John Birch Society), “the 42-year-old Hemingway was recruited (by the KGB) under the cover name 'Argo' in 1941 and cooperated with Soviet agents whom he met in Havana and London.”

Turns out that Papa failed pathetically at his KGB assignment. (His assignment and failure are completely absent from the docuseries.) But hey, it’s the thought that counts! And the thought was to be a member of the most murderous organization in modern history during its most murderous phase. (Stalin’s NKVD under Lavrenti Beria.) A singular honor, surely! Though you’d never guess it from the “subversive” PBS docuseries (i.e. fluff piece.)

“Castro’s revolution is very pure and beautiful," gushed Hemingway in March, 1960. “I’m encouraged by it. The Cuban people now have a decent chance for the first time. The Cubans getting shot all deserve it.”

Quite fittingly, when Soviet diplomat Anastas Mikoyan finished his courtesy calls on Fidel Castro and Che Guevara in Havana in 1960—this long-time Stalin and Beria confidant made it a point to call on Ernest Hemingway.

Hemingway knew full well what was going on behind the scenes of Castro and Che’s “pure and beautiful” revolution. Accounts of "Papa” Hemingway’s eager presence at many of the Katyn-like massacres of untried Cubans comes courtesy of Hemingway's own friend, the late George Plimpton (not exactly an “embittered right-wing Cuban exile!”) who worked as editor of the Paris Review, (not exactly a "McCarthyite scandal sheet.")

In 1958 George Plimpton interviewed Hemingway in Cuba for one of the Paris Review’s most famous pieces. They became friends and the following year Hemingway again invited Plimpton down to his Finca Vigia just outside Havana. James Scott Linville, an editor at The Paris Review during the 1990s, while relating how this high-brow publication passed on serializing the manuscript that became Che Guevara’s Motorcycle Diaries, reveals “Papa’s” unwitting role in the rejection.

“I took the paper-clipped excerpt upstairs to the Boss (Plimpton),” writes Linville, “and said I had something strange and good. As I started to tell him about it, his smile faded. I stopped my pitch and said, 'Boss, what's the matter?'"

"James, I'm sorry," Linville recalls Plimpton replying. A sad look came over him, and he said, "Years ago, after we'd done the interview, Papa invited me down again to Cuba. It was right after the revolution. “There's something you should see,” Hemingway told Plimpton while preparing a shaker of drinks for the outing.

“They got in the car with a few others and drove some way out of town,” continues Linville (who is recalling Plimpton’s account.) “They got out, set up chairs and took out the drinks, as if they were going to watch the sunset. Soon, a truck arrived. This, explained George, was what they'd been waiting for. It came, as Hemingway knew the same time each day. It stopped and some men with guns got out of it. In the back were a couple of dozen others who were tied up. Prisoners.

“The men with guns hustled the others out of the back of the truck, and lined them up. Then they shot them. They put the bodies back into the truck.”

And so it started. Within a few years 16,000 men and boys (some of them U.S. citizens) would fill mass graves after scenes like the ones that so charmed Papa Hemingway with his thermos of specially-prepared Daiquiris. The figure for the Castroite murder tally is not difficult to find. Simply open "The Black Book of Communism," written by French scholars and published in English by Harvard University Press (neither exactly an outpost of “embittered- right-wing Cuban-exiles-with an axe-to-grind!”)

Hemingway’s friends, while he gallivanted around Red Spain during the Spanish Civil war, included Luis Quintanilla, Gustav Regler, Milton Wolff, Karol Swierezenski, Nicolas Guillen, Ilya Ehrenburg and Gustavo Duran. Every single one was a dedicated member of the communist party at a time Joe Stalin called all the Comintern’s shots.

But the Spaniard Gustavo Duran (who Hemingway reputedly used as his model for Robert Jordan in "For Whom the Bell Tolls") went above and beyond the call of typical communist party duty during the Spanish Civil War. Duran also served in the Soviet-run SIM (Servicio Intelligencia Militar) that weeded out and murdered “Fascists, Trotskyists” and other such deplorables when Stalin spread his Great Terror and purges to Spain.

It says much about the Roosevelt administration that Duran, thanks to strings pulled by his friend Hemingway, was granted U.S. citizenship and hired by the U.S. State Department to work in the Havana and Buenos Aires Buenos embassies during World War II.

“Tailgunner Joe,” McCarthy outed Gustavo Duran in 1951, as one of those famous State Department reds on his famous list. Needless to add, this accusation provoked howls of protest and derision from the Democrat-media complex of the time. When Tailgunner held up a picture (yes, “I hold here in my hand!”) of Duran in his Soviet murderer’s uniform, the howls subsided—but only slightly. By then Duran had already scooted over to a spot at the U.N.

On the plus side, (Ernest Hemingway) had a tremendous capacity to see the world around him with clarity, to see through bullsh*t and hypocrisy and to cut to the heart of things,” gushes Hemingway docuseries co-producer Lynn Novick.

“A writer without a sense of justice and of injustice would be better off editing the yearbook of a school,” wrote Hemingway. “The most essential gift for a good writer is a built-in, shockproof, sh*t detector.”

So was Hemingway duped by Stalinism and its Cuban clone Castroism? Did his sh*t-detector malfunction? Well, the KGB, while certainly appreciating the work of dupes and useful idiots, was not known to (openly) sign them on.

Considering the quotes above in light of Hemingway’s documented history, does he qualify as yet another celebrity “Useful Idiot?”

Hardly. Instead he comes across as a conscious and dedicated communist agent of influence.

Imagine a famous 20 th century writer, however gifted at his art, secretly volunteering for Hitler’s Abwehr or Gestapo, consorting with Nazis much of his life -- and having it all completely ignored by documentarians who bill themselves as “frank,” “courageous” and dedicated to documenting “the man in full.”


Gustav Regler -->

Narodil se v rodině knihkupce v sárském městě Merzig. Během první světové války byl tě𗻎 zraněn během plynového útoku na německo-francouzské frontě. Po válce studoval na mnichovské univerzitě filosofii, dějiny a francouzštinu. Rovněž se připojil k Bavorské republice rad. V roce 1922 byl promován na doktora filosofie na základě obhajoby pr Ironie v Goethově díle (Ironie im Werk Goethes). Téhož roku se o៮nil s Charlotte Dietze, dcerou textilního podnikatele. Pracoval jako redaktor novin Nürnberg-Fürther Morgenpresse. V roce 1928 se seznámil s Marií Louise (Mieke) Vogeler, dcerou malíᖞ Heinricha Vogelera. Následujໜího roku pᖞsໝlil do umělecké kolonie v Berlíně-Wilmsdorfu. Pod vlivem Vogelerovým vstoupil do komunistické strany. V roce 1932 vydal úspěšný román Voda, chlປ a modré fazole [p 1] (Wasser, Brot und blaue Bohnen).

Po požáru Říšského sněmu v roce 1933 uprchl p𕧭 gestapem do Paří៮. Zde přispěl mimo jiné do sborníku Hnᆽá kniha o požáru Říšského sněmu a Hitlerově teroru (Braunbuch ﲾr Reichstagsbrand und Hitler-Terror). Uplatnil tu své znalosti stavby z doby obrany sněmu proti levicovým radikálům v roce 1919. Byl obლnem Sárska, kde mělo rozhodnout referendum, zda má být tato země připojena k Německé říši, k Francii či zůstat samostatným státem. Aby ovlivnil toto referendum, vydal v roce 1934 román V křížové palbě (Im Kreuzfeuer). Většina obyvatel Sárska ale rozhodla o připojení země k Říši. Ještě té៮ noci uprchl Regler do Francie. Zde se seznámil s Egonem Ervínem Kischem či s Lenkou Reinerovou.

Zúლstnil se sjezdů levicov࿜h spisovatelů v Moskvě v letech 1934 a 1936. Zde se seznámil s André Malrauxem, Iljou Erenburgem či Klausem Mannem. Během druhého sjezdu si ale také povšiml, ៮ někteří ruští spisovatelé byli v mezidobí odstraněni nebo popraveni. To vzbudilo jeho pochybnosti o správnosti stalinského režimu.


Po vypuknutí španělské obლnské války se zapojil do organizace interbrigฝ. Byl tě𗻎 zraněn a Ernest Hemingway jej pozval do Spojen࿜h států americk࿜h. Zde napsal román Velký příklad (Das gro෾ Beispiel). Kniha vyšla v roce 1940 v anglickém pᖞkladu The Great Crusade s p𕧭mluvou Ernsta Hemingwaye, byla ale zastíněna Hemingwayovou knihou Komu zvoní hrana. Regler se v roce 1938 vrátil do Francie, kde byl na počátku druhé světové války v roce 1939 jako cizinec internován v tปoᖞ Le Vernet. V internaci se znovu setkal s Lenkou Reinerovou, která na to vzpomíná ve své knize Hranice uzavᖞny (Grenze geschlossen). Tvrzení o tom, ៮ Regler zradil německého antifašistu Gerharda Eislera se ale nezakljí na pravdě. Na přímluvu 𕦭y osobností světové kultury byl po půl roce propuštěn a spolu s Marií Louise Vogeler emigroval do Spojen࿜h států americk࿜h. Zde se znovu setkal s Kischem a podobně jako on odeᘞl do Mexika, kde se o៮nil s Marií Louise Vogeler.

Přátelství s Kischem bylo nalomeno v roce 1939, kdy Stalin uzavᖞl dohodu s Hitlerem. Zatímco Kisch zastával oficiální stanoviska sovětské komunistické strany, Regler kritizoval cynismus její politiky. Poté, co Regler otiskl v německém komunistickém ლsopisu Análisis, vydávaném v Mexiku, kritiku spisovatele Otto Katze, došlo k definitivní roztr𗻎. Tím ale ztratil možnost publikovat v komunistick࿜h nakladatelstvໜh. Zᖞkl se komunismu a po zbytek války se živil jako farmář. V roce 1945 zemᖞla jeho man៮lka. O rok později se o៮nil znovu s Ameriლnkou Peggy Paul.

Po válce se krátce vrátil do rodného Sárska. Psal romány, knihy o Mexiku, historické publikace a rozhlasové eseje. V roce 1963 mu André Malraux zprost𕧭koval schůzku s D៪váharlálem Néhrྮm. Během návštěvy v Novém Díllí Regler zemᖞl na mozkovou mrtvici.


Emblem of the International Brigades

Regler served in the Germany Infantry during the First World War and was seriously injured. He joined the Communist Partyand spent time in the USSR. He later served as political commissar ΐ] of the XII International Brigade during the Spanish Civil War. Whilst in Spain he befriended Ernest Hemingway and was wounded at the Battle of Guadalajara. Α]

As a Communist, he was long-time friend of Arthur Koestler, first in Berlin, then Paris and during the Spanish Civil War. Regler's books were banned in the Third Reich. While in Spain, he wrote articles as a special correspondent for the Deutsche Zentral Zeitung. Β] He accompanied Lillian Hellman on a visit to a Benicàssim hospital in October 1937. Γ]


Gustav Regler - History

Posted on 04/10/2021 4:22:21 AM PDT by Kaslin

“They Are Giving Hemingway Another Look, So You Can, Too…Lynn Novick and Ken Burns consider the seminal writer in all his complexity and controversy in their new PBS documentary series. Could there be anything more subversive than turning a spotlight, in this moment, on Ernest Hemingway?” wrote Gal Beckerman in the The New York Times this month.

“Subversive?” Ah! At least the term appears in connection with the docuseries. And considering that Ernest Hemingway eagerly joined Stalin’s KGB (technically the NKVD at the time), secretly contributed tens of thousands to the Cuban communist party and (literally) drank, as a spectator, to Che Guevara and Fidel Castros’ firing-squad murder marathons, you might think the term “subversive” fits.

Alas! No hint of his communist sympathies and connections come across in this “frank” and “subversive” and “controversial” docuseries, which actually seems like it would be something that might have been produced by Hemingway’s mass-murdering chums in Moscow or Havana 40 years ago.

Perhaps some of you weren’t aware that declassified Soviet documents proved that Ernest Hemingway officially signed up with the KGB’s precursor the NKVD as “Agent Argo” in 1941?

OK. But don’t take it from me. After all I’m a “rabidly right-wing-Cuban exile-with-an-axe-to-grind!” Instead take it from the crypto-commie (but well-sourced) UK Guardian.

According to KGB defector Alexander Vassiliev in a book published by Yale University Press (not exactly a branch of the John Birch Society), “the 42-year-old Hemingway was recruited (by the KGB) under the cover name “Argo” in 1941 and cooperated with Soviet agents whom he met in Havana and London.”

Turns out that Papa failed pathetically at his KGB assignment. (His assignment and failure are completely absent from the docuseries.) But hey, it’s the thought that counts! And the thought was to be a member of the most murderous organization in modern history during its most murderous phase. (Stalin’s NKVD under Lavrenti Beria.) A singular honor, surely! Though you’d never guess it from the “subversive” PBS docuseries (i.e. fluff piece.)

“Castro’s revolution is very pure and beautiful," gushed Hemingway in March, 1960. “I’m encouraged by it. The Cuban people now have a decent chance for the first time. The Cubans getting shot all deserve it.”

Quite fittingly, when Soviet diplomat Anastas Mikoyan finished his courtesy calls on Fidel Castro and Che Guevara in Havana in 1960—this long-time Stalin and Beria confidant made it a point to call on Ernest Hemingway.

Hemingway knew full well what was going on behind the scenes of Castro and Che’s “pure and beautiful” revolution. Accounts of "Papa” Hemingway’s eager presence at many of the Katyn-like massacres of untried Cubans comes courtesy of Hemingway's own friend, the late George Plimpton (not exactly an “embittered right-wing Cuban exile!”) who worked as editor of the Paris Review, (not exactly a "McCarthyite scandal sheet.")

In 1958 George Plimpton interviewed Hemingway in Cuba for one of the Paris Review’s most famous pieces. They became friends and the following year Hemingway again invited Plimpton down to his Finca Vigia just outside Havana. James Scott Linville, an editor at The Paris Review during the 1990s, while relating how this high-brow publication passed on serializing the manuscript that became Che Guevara’s Motorcycle Diaries, reveals “Papa’s” unwitting role in the rejection.

“I took the paper-clipped excerpt upstairs to the Boss (Plimpton),” writes Linville, “and said I had something strange and good. As I started to tell him about it, his smile faded. I stopped my pitch and said, 'Boss, what's the matter?'"

"James, I'm sorry," Linville recalls Plimpton replying. A sad look came over him, and he said, "Years ago, after we'd done the interview, Papa invited me down again to Cuba. It was right after the revolution. “There's something you should see,” Hemingway told Plimpton while preparing a shaker of drinks for the outing.

“They got in the car with a few others and drove some way out of town,” continues Linville (who is recalling Plimpton’s account.) “They got out, set up chairs and took out the drinks, as if they were going to watch the sunset. Soon, a truck arrived. This, explained George, was what they'd been waiting for. It came, as Hemingway knew the same time each day. It stopped and some men with guns got out of it. In the back were a couple of dozen others who were tied up. Prisoners.

“The men with guns hustled the others out of the back of the truck, and lined them up. Then they shot them. They put the bodies back into the truck.”

And so it started. Within a few years 16,000 men and boys (some of them U.S. citizens) would fill mass graves after scenes like the ones that so charmed Papa Hemingway with his thermos of specially-prepared Daiquiris. The figure for the Castroite murder tally is not difficult to find. Simply open "The Black Book of Communism," written by French scholars and published in English by Harvard University Press (neither exactly an outpost of “embittered- right-wing Cuban-exiles-with an axe-to-grind!”)

Hemingway’s friends, while he gallivanted around Red Spain during the Spanish Civil war, included Luis Quintanilla, Gustav Regler, Milton Wolff, Karol Swierezenski, Nicolas Guillen, Ilya Ehrenburg and Gustavo Duran. Every single one was a dedicated member of the communist party at a time Joe Stalin called all the Comintern’s shots.

But the Spaniard Gustavo Duran (who Hemingway reputedly used as his model for Robert Jordan in "For Whom the Bell Tolls") went above and beyond the call of typical communist party duty during the Spanish Civil War. Duran also served in the Soviet-run SIM (Servicio Intelligencia Militar) that weeded out and murdered “Fascists, Trotskyists” and other such deplorables when Stalin spread his Great Terror and purges to Spain.

It says much about the Roosevelt administration that Duran, thanks to strings pulled by his friend Hemingway, was granted U.S. citizenship and hired by the U.S. State Department to work in the Havana and Buenos Aires Buenos embassies during World War II.

“Tailgunner Joe,” McCarthy outed Gustavo Duran in 1951, as one of those famous State Department reds on his famous list. Needless to add, this accusation provoked howls of protest and derision from the Democrat-media complex of the time. When Tailgunner held up a picture (yes, “I hold here in my hand!”) of Duran in his Soviet murderer’s uniform, the howls subsided—but only slightly. By then Duran had already scooted over to a spot at the U.N.

On the plus side, (Ernest Hemingway) had a tremendous capacity to see the world around him with clarity, to see through bullsh*t and hypocrisy and to cut to the heart of things,” gushes Hemingway docuseries co-producer Lynn Novick.

“A writer without a sense of justice and of injustice would be better off editing the yearbook of a school,” wrote Hemingway. “The most essential gift for a good writer is a built-in, shockproof, sh*t detector.”

So was Hemingway duped by Stalinism and its Cuban clone Castroism? Did his sh*t-detector malfunction? Well, the KGB, while certainly appreciating the work of dupes and useful idiots, was not known to (openly) sign them on.

Considering the quotes above in light of Hemingway’s documented history, does he qualify as yet another celebrity “Useful Idiot?”

Hardly. Instead he comes across as a conscious and dedicated communist agent of influence.

Imagine a famous 20 th century writer, however gifted at his art, secretly volunteering for Hitler’s Abwehr or Gestapo, consorting with Nazis much of his life -- and having it all completely ignored by documentarians who bill themselves as “frank,” “courageous” and dedicated to documenting “the man in full.”


--> Regler, Gustav, 1898-1963

Gustav Regler (1898-1963) was a German writer and anti-Fascist.

Threatened with arrest by the Nazi government, he emigrated to France, and later, to Mexico during the Second World War. Best known for his autobiography THE OWL OF MINERVA, Regler was the author of numerous and diverse works of prose and poetry, including THE GREAT CRUSADE, a novel based on his experiences fighting for the Loyalist cause in the Spanish Civil War and A LAND BEWITCHED: MEXICO IN THE SHADOW OF THE CENTURIES.

Mary Maverick Lloyd (1906-1976) was a peace and world government activist and supporter of a numerous individuals and initiatives dedicated to social justice. She was a founder of the Campaign for World Government and the World Council for a Peoples World Constitutional Convention.

From the description of Gustav Regler Letters to Mary Maverick Lloyd, 1939-1959. (New York Public Library). WorldCat record id: 122454997

Gustav Regler (1898-1963) was a German writer and anti-Fascist. Threatened with arrest by the Nazi government, he emigrated to France, and later, to Mexico during the Second World War. Best known for his autobiography The Owl of Minerva, Regler was the author of numerous and diverse works of prose and poetry, including The Great Crusade, a novel based on his experiences fighting for the Loyalist cause in the Spanish Civil War and A Land Bewitched: Mexico In the Shadow of the Centuries .

Mary Maverick Lloyd (1906-1976) was a peace and world government activist and supporter of a numerous individuals and initiatives dedicated to social justice. She was a founder of the Campaign for World Government and the World Council for a Peoples World Constitutional Convention.

From the guide to the Gustav Regler Letters to Mary Maverick Lloyd, 1939-1959, (The New York Public Library. Manuscripts and Archives Division.)


Gustav Regler - History

Ernest Hemingway with Ilya Ehrenburg and Gustav Regler during the Spanish Civil War.

In January 1937 the Congress passed the Neutrality Act of 1937 at the request of President Roosevelt. The act banned weapons sales to Spain. It did however allow countries to purchase weapons for cash if they could carry them on their own ships.

In July 1936, civil war broke out in Spain. Germany and Italy supported the rebels, led by General Francisco Franco, and France and the Soviet Union supported the legitimate government. Fear of the Spanish Civil War spreading resulted in the Europeans imposing an arms embargo against all sides of the dispute. President Roosevelt asked American arms manufacturers to impose a moral embargo, as legislation then on the books did not provide him with the power to impose an embargo on a country in the midst of a civil war. When this did not work, Roosevelt asked that the law be extended to civil wars, and Congress promptly complied.

Liberals who supported the Republican government in Spain were outraged. They claimed that it was not fair to deny the legitimate government the arms that it needed to defend itself, especially since Nazi Germany and Italy continued to support Franco.

On April 30, Congress passed a resolution making the Neutrality Acts permanent. In addition, the acts contained two new features. American citizens were forbidden to travel on belligerent vessels, and the President was allowed to sell to belligerents for cash, as long as the belligerents could carry the goods away on their ships.


Gustav Regler - History

An Online Research Center on the History and Theory of Anarchism

Who Killed Carlo Tresca

Communist Party" in an attempt to have certain anti-Fascist refugees deported. Thes included Victor Serge, Marceau Pivert, Julian Gorkin, and Gustav Regler, all of whom had devoted their lives to the fight for freedom and yet were accused of being leaders of a Fifth Column in Latin America.

After Treca's death, both the Stalinist press and Robert Minor, assistant national secretary of the American Communist Party, protested that the Communists were averse to murder, and Minor asserted that his party had never found it necessary to combat politically Tresca's views or activities.

But, the Mazzini Society said in a public statement, ". the files of the Daily Worker are replete with invective against Tresca." And in 1938, soon after he testified in the Poyntz case, he was attacked by the Italian National Commission of the Communist Party and by Pietro Allegra.

Allegra published a pamphlet entitled The Moral Suicide of Carlo Tresca, calling him "politically dead" and assailing him on many counts, including "defeatist acts against anti-Fascist and Republican Spain" and his having "denounced the Communists to the authorities, saying they kidnapped and killed a woman."

"It is painful enough to witness his suicide," Allegra stated. ". If he, Carlo Tresca, had lost all sense of reason and decency, then. for the sake of the public welfare and for anti-Fascism, it's a duty to put a stop to his deleterious, disgusting work as a real and true enemy of anti-Fascists.

"So for reasons of public health, in the interest of anti-Fascism. It's a civic, social work that I'm doing when I concern myself with Carlo Tresca. It's a work of protection, of elimination from society, of beings who are hateful to themselves and to society, which must oust them. " (Emphasis above is ours.)

About the same time the Italian National Commission of the Communist Party, in a statement featured in the February 28 (1938) issue of L'Unita Operaia, Stalinist paper published in New York, said:

". Tresca's isolation is a measure of elementary defense for all anti-Fascism.

"Without any other preoccupation except that of protecting and safeguarding anti Fascism, we therefore launch a fraternal appeal to the militants of all groups or political parties. that in the common interest they make Tresca understand that police informers will no longer be tolerated in the political and labor movement. "

Tresca Sees Grim Meaning in Communist Attack

From this statement Carlo drew a sinister meaning. Answering in Il Martello for March 7, he wrote:

"If Tresca is alive, sane, and not inclined to die, either physically or politically to (please) the melancholy, Pietrino (Allegra).. it will be necessary to put him out of the way, definitely. In a word: what is needed is a George Mink, a member of the Communist Party of America, and the murderer of our comrades Berneri and Barbieri. It must not be said that such a sanguinary and macabre idea has not come into the heads of the four

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PBS Docuseries on Hemingway Covers-Up His Communist Connections

“They Are Giving Hemingway Another Look, So You Can, Too…Lynn Novick and Ken Burns consider the seminal writer in all his complexity and controversy in their new PBS documentary series. Could there be anything more subversive than turning a spotlight, in this moment, on Ernest Hemingway?” wrote Gal Beckerman in the The New York Times this month.

“Subversive?” Ah! At least the term appears in connection with the docuseries. And considering that Ernest Hemingway eagerly joined Stalin’s KGB (technically the NKVD at the time), secretly contributed tens of thousands to the Cuban communist party and (literally) drank, as a spectator, to Che Guevara and Fidel Castros’ firing-squad murder marathons, you might think the term “subversive” fits.

Alas! No hint of his communist sympathies and connections come across in this “frank” and “subversive” and “controversial” docuseries, which actually seems like it would be something that might have been produced by Hemingway’s mass-murdering chums in Moscow or Havana 40 years ago.

Perhaps some of you weren’t aware that declassified Soviet documents proved that Ernest Hemingway officially signed up with the KGB’s precursor the NKVD as “Agent Argo” in 1941?

OK. But don’t take it from me. After all I’m a “rabidly right-wing-Cuban exile-with-an-axe-to-grind!” Instead take it from the crypto-commie (but well-sourced) UK Guardian.

According to KGB defector Alexander Vassiliev in a book published by Yale University Press (not exactly a branch of the John Birch Society), “the 42-year-old Hemingway was recruited (by the KGB) under the cover name “Argo” in 1941 and cooperated with Soviet agents whom he met in Havana and London.”

Turns out that Papa failed pathetically at his KGB assignment. (His assignment and failure are completely absent from the docuseries.) But hey, it’s the thought that counts! And the thought was to be a member of the most murderous organization in modern history during its most murderous phase. (Stalin’s NKVD under Lavrenti Beria.) A singular honor, surely! Though you’d never guess it from the “subversive” PBS docuseries (i.e. fluff piece.)

“Castro’s revolution is very pure and beautiful," gushed Hemingway in March, 1960. “I’m encouraged by it. The Cuban people now have a decent chance for the first time. The Cubans getting shot all deserve it.”

Quite fittingly, when Soviet diplomat Anastas Mikoyan finished his courtesy calls on Fidel Castro and Che Guevara in Havana in 1960—this long-time Stalin and Beria confidant made it a point to call on Ernest Hemingway.

Hemingway knew full well what was going on behind the scenes of Castro and Che’s “pure and beautiful” revolution. Accounts of "Papa” Hemingway’s eager presence at many of the Katyn-like massacres of untried Cubans comes courtesy of Hemingway's own friend, the late George Plimpton (not exactly an “embittered right-wing Cuban exile!”) who worked as editor of the Paris Review, (not exactly a "McCarthyite scandal sheet.")

In 1958 George Plimpton interviewed Hemingway in Cuba for one of the Paris Review’s most famous pieces. They became friends and the following year Hemingway again invited Plimpton down to his Finca Vigia just outside Havana. James Scott Linville, an editor at The Paris Review during the 1990s, while relating how this high-brow publication passed on serializing the manuscript that became Che Guevara’s Motorcycle Diaries, reveals “Papa’s” unwitting role in the rejection.

“I took the paper-clipped excerpt upstairs to the Boss (Plimpton),” writes Linville, “and said I had something strange and good. As I started to tell him about it, his smile faded. I stopped my pitch and said, 'Boss, what's the matter?'"

"James, I'm sorry," Linville recalls Plimpton replying. A sad look came over him, and he said, "Years ago, after we'd done the interview, Papa invited me down again to Cuba. It was right after the revolution. “There's something you should see,” Hemingway told Plimpton while preparing a shaker of drinks for the outing.

“They got in the car with a few others and drove some way out of town,” continues Linville (who is recalling Plimpton’s account.) “They got out, set up chairs and took out the drinks, as if they were going to watch the sunset. Soon, a truck arrived. This, explained George, was what they'd been waiting for. It came, as Hemingway knew the same time each day. It stopped and some men with guns got out of it. In the back were a couple of dozen others who were tied up. Prisoners.

“The men with guns hustled the others out of the back of the truck, and lined them up. Then they shot them. They put the bodies back into the truck.”

And so it started. Within a few years 16,000 men and boys (some of them U.S. citizens) would fill mass graves after scenes like the ones that so charmed Papa Hemingway with his thermos of specially-prepared Daiquiris. The figure for the Castroite murder tally is not difficult to find. Simply open "The Black Book of Communism," written by French scholars and published in English by Harvard University Press (neither exactly an outpost of “embittered- right-wing Cuban-exiles-with an axe-to-grind!”)

Hemingway’s friends, while he gallivanted around Red Spain during the Spanish Civil war, included Luis Quintanilla, Gustav Regler, Milton Wolff, Karol Swierezenski, Nicolas Guillen, Ilya Ehrenburg and Gustavo Duran. Every single one was a dedicated member of the communist party at a time Joe Stalin called all the Comintern’s shots.

But the Spaniard Gustavo Duran (who Hemingway reputedly used as his model for Robert Jordan in "For Whom the Bell Tolls") went above and beyond the call of typical communist party duty during the Spanish Civil War. Duran also served in the Soviet-run SIM (Servicio Intelligencia Militar) that weeded out and murdered “Fascists, Trotskyists” and other such deplorables when Stalin spread his Great Terror and purges to Spain.

It says much about the Roosevelt administration that Duran, thanks to strings pulled by his friend Hemingway, was granted U.S. citizenship and hired by the U.S. State Department to work in the Havana and Buenos Aires Buenos embassies during World War II.

“Tailgunner Joe,” McCarthy outed Gustavo Duran in 1951, as one of those famous State Department reds on his famous list. Needless to add, this accusation provoked howls of protest and derision from the Democrat-media complex of the time. When Tailgunner held up a picture (yes, “I hold here in my hand!”) of Duran in his Soviet murderer’s uniform, the howls subsided—but only slightly. By then Duran had already scooted over to a spot at the U.N.

On the plus side, (Ernest Hemingway) had a tremendous capacity to see the world around him with clarity, to see through bullsh*t and hypocrisy and to cut to the heart of things,” gushes Hemingway docuseries co-producer Lynn Novick.

“A writer without a sense of justice and of injustice would be better off editing the yearbook of a school,” wrote Hemingway. “The most essential gift for a good writer is a built-in, shockproof, sh*t detector.”

So was Hemingway duped by Stalinism and its Cuban clone Castroism? Did his sh*t-detector malfunction? Well, the KGB, while certainly appreciating the work of dupes and useful idiots, was not known to (openly) sign them on.

Considering the quotes above in light of Hemingway’s documented history, does he qualify as yet another celebrity “Useful Idiot?”

Hardly. Instead he comes across as a conscious and dedicated communist agent of influence.

Imagine a famous 20 th century writer, however gifted at his art, secretly volunteering for Hitler’s Abwehr or Gestapo, consorting with Nazis much of his life -- and having it all completely ignored by documentarians who bill themselves as “frank,” “courageous” and dedicated to documenting “the man in full.”


Ernest Hemingway

Encyclopedia Article

Nobel Prize in Literature, The Sun Also Rises, For Whom the Bell Tolls, The Old Man and the Sea, Oak Park, Illinois

Authority control

Encyclopedia Article

Library of Congress, Diana, Princess of Wales, Latin, Oclc, Integrated Authority File

Spanish Civil War

Encyclopedia Article

Spain, Second Spanish Republic, Nazi Germany, Confederación Nacional del Trabajo, Soviet Union


Watch the video: Plenumsrede , Oskar Lafontaine DIE LINKE, Windkraftanlagen am Gustav-Regler-Weg 2 (June 2022).


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